Feeling “Blessed,” Raising Thousands, and Finding Hope: Our Clients in the News

Just a few months into 2017, Help Hope Live clients are getting their stories featured in news outlets across the nation. Here are three standout stories of hope.


Rachelle Ledbetter: Community Responds to Rare Diagnosis with Resounding Strength


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In 1968, Rachelle Ledbetter was the first child to be diagnosed with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), a chronic condition characterized by an exaggerated response of the immune system to the fungus Aspergillus. By adulthood, her hypersensitivity to environmental allergens had developed into a secondary infection that would necessitate a double lung transplant.

Rachelle is the former owner of the Sequoia Sentinel weekly newspaper. Out of respect for her editorial legacy, the Kawaeah Commonwealth, a more recent incarnation of the Sentinel, published in-depth coverage of Rachelle’s medical journey, her “upbeat and positive” outlook, and her plans for a community-driven Help Hope Live fundraiser.

We learned in March that the Spaghetti Feed raised a whopping $8,880 for the Help Hope Live Southwest Lung Transplant Fund in honor of Rachelle. “Apparently, the food ran out after serving 300 meals,” Rachelle wrote in an update on her Help Hope Live campaign page, “and yet you kept coming!” (Rachelle’s Lifetime ‘Journey to New Lungs’)


Michael Thor: Returning Home and Rekindling Hope After a Life-Changing Injury


Michael Thor Help Hope Live

Michael Thor with his wife and caregiver

In November 2015, Michael Thor was hit by a car while riding his motorcycle. He sustained a C2 spinal cord injury. At the time, he was in the process of pursuing one of his lifelong dreams: opening a restaurant with a good friend. The accident put Michael’s restaurant plans and the rest of his passions on hold as he and his family adjusted to his new life with quadriplegia.

After a year and a half of out-of-state intensive therapy, and just a few months after its grand opening, Michael was finally able to return home to see his restaurant in action. Tears filled his eyes as he witnessed how his business partner and staff members had come together to turn their shared vision into reality. “I could not be more proud,” said Michael.

A fundraiser held at Michael’s restaurant kicked off fundraising efforts for the Help Hope Live Southeast Spinal Cord Injury Fund to support ongoing rehabilitation. “I can tell that Mike has been rejuvenated,” wife and caregiver, Sarah, said in an update. “It was a really big morale boost for him to get back home. We were able to raise around $6,000. We truly can’t thank you enough.” (Restaurant Holds Fundraiser for Paralyzed Raleigh Chef)


Kimberly Grossman: Feeling “Blessed” as Faith Community Steps Up to Help


Kimberly Grossman Help Hope Live

Kimberly Grossman with her twins

Though she’s fighting chronic kidney disease, Kimberly Grossman considers herself blessed. Kimberly was diagnosed with end-stage renal disease in her twenties based on symptoms that had been following her around since she was just three months old. Kimberly’s strong connection to a faith-based community in her area provided the starting point for her fundraising campaign.

A spaghetti dinner fundraiser for the Help Hope Live South-Central Kidney Transplant Fund became an emotional lifeline as Kimberly met with friends and neighbors who showed that they cared about her. She and her 5-year-old twins are lifetime church members. “We wanted to do what Jesus tells us to do and help as much as we could,” explained Kimberly’s pastor.

Kimberly “fought back tears” as she reflected on her gratitude for community support. She advised others facing a transplant to “find as many ways as possible to fundraise. There are lots of people wanting to help.” (Spaghetti Dinner Fundraising for Woman in Need of Kidney Transplant)


Want your campaign to get featured in the news, too? Reach out to your Fundraising Coordinator today to receive media outreach support. 

Diving Deep: Learning to Stand, Snorkel and Reclaim a Sense of Self

Theo St. Francis has been exploring the world of body-connection since his 2013 C6 spinal cord injury at the start of his Mechanical Engineering studies at MIT. Having been opened to a whole new way of being through his practice of Pilates, he is working to make mindful movement a standard in neuro-recovery.

He has been fundraising with Help Hope Live for intensive physical therapy and cutting-edge rehabilitation since June 2014.


What would it feel like to be able to just jump – and start flying? Well, I don’t know, and the birds won’t say, but I’ll bet the experience would be indescribable, and ‘indescribable’ is something I know.

Since my body has been partially paralyzed for almost three years, it is understandable that I’ve forgotten what some things feel like. That’s how our plastic, use-it-or-lose-it brains work: the subconscious patterns of walking and standing, of dancing without thinking, don’t get reinforced when the muscular connection isn’t present.

This is part of the overwhelming feeling of loss that accompanies a paralyzing injury to the spinal cord (SCI) because, in some ways, one’s sense-of-self fades with the loss of those patterns. When the physical manner by which you relate to the world is changed, the emotional nature of that relationship is changed as well.

Theo St. Francis Help Hope Live diving

“One’s sense-of-self fades” with the loss of familiar physical patterns


A flash…


One day in May, I noticed something strangely familiar during my regular 3-hour neuro-Pilates workout. We prepared to use a trapeze table, or trap table, a piece of Pilates equipment with a wooden bar hanging by springs from a frame. For some time my trainer and I had been stumped – I had developed feeling in my hip muscles while kneeling, yet when on my feet, my system turned off.

trapeze table Pilates

An example of a Pilates trapeze table

On that afternoon, we incrementally raised my knees on foam wedges until my feet were on the floor; with my hands on table-uprights, the vertical bars at each end of the trap table, and an arc blocking my knees, I lowered myself into a squat and, for the first time ever, pressed back up to standing!

“Wow, so this is what it feels like to connect to my legs!” was my first thought, and after the third unsupported squat, I felt a visceral excitement and had a fleeting image of letting go of the trap table, turning toward the door, and just walking outside. It was as if my body just remembered its own capability. Can you imagine? It was glorious. Indescribable!


Progress has been from many directions


Since my injury in Boston Harbor in August 2013, I have received care from experts in hospitals, rehab centers, SCI CrossFit gyms, Eastern medicine enclaves, and Pilates studios. I’ve learned from a variety of therapists with different but overlapping skills and set up equipment in our home to extend workouts throughout the day and evening. I feel very fortunate to have found the talented members that comprise my rehabilitation team.

Throughout this extensive process, the unflagging assistance of my family members has been invaluable. Their efforts– from the early days in the hospital to working with the medical staff and learning the techniques that would help me in daily activities to seamlessly managing logistics until I could do so myself–have been essential, both in the acts themselves and in the time and space they’ve created for me to pursue my therapies with rigor.

Also significant in my recovery, has been working with the Neuro-Kinetic Pilates specialists on Maui. In my most recent sessions there this June, I was able to find my own lateral hip strength in a stagger-stand position. I have been working to achieve this stability since I first muscularly connected my torso 18 months ago. It is immensely satisfying to finally achieve this result.

Theo St. Francis Help Hope Live rehab

“It is immensely satisfying” to regain physical ability at any level after injury

While all of this bodily improvement was happening, something even more significant occurred between my sessions: independence…in two ways.

For the first time really ever, this 21-year-old lived completely by himself. In truth, it was for less than a week – friends and family visited me on the island at other times – but, even so, after all I was told by doctors about the purported permanence of my paralysis, to be able to thrive on my own was a turning point in my recovery.

I am quite aware that this independence has only been achievable through the incredible support of so many over the last few years, especially all of those who have helped me and my parents with fundraising and driving to therapy appointments. My family is sincerely grateful for the support of so many people through Help Hope Live that make it possible for me to pursue the most effective recovery treatments. This sense of wonder for the gifts of support is also indescribable.


Diving deep


The second form of independence was very different. The day I fractured my C6 vertebra was less than a week before my first practice on MIT’s Varsity Swim Team, to which I’d been recruited as a backstroker. Even with all my progress since, I still require a hip-float to stay above water. That’s fine; except when I was in Maui swimming above scores of fish, coral, and turtles along the reefs 10 feet below. There was no way I was going to forgo some of the world’s premier reef-level snorkeling by being bound to the surface. Confident in how my improved core strength enabled me to control my breathing, I unclipped the float, handed it to my friend, and madly used my arms to fight the saltwater’s buoyancy. After some practice, I became comfortable descending over 20 feet and, on my last day on the island, I swam floatless for a full 40 minutes.

To me, going floatless is about far more than being eye-to-eye with Reef Triggerfish. It’s about stripping away the support I think I need to discover my true abilities, and in so doing, rediscovering that sense of self. It’s about diving deep into a fear, a perceived limitation, and returning to the surface with new appreciation for what is possible.

Through these moments of ecstatic, indescribable joy I can happily see that this truly may be the beginning of the final stage of my overcoming.

Theo St. Francis Help Hope Live smile

Theo pursues and relishes “moments of ecstatic, indescribable joy”


Last fall, Theo St. Francis presented his first workshop and co-wrote a textbook on Pilates for SCI with his trainer, Stephanie Behrendt, and they plan to expand the curriculum (zebrafishneuro.com for more). Theo has also found his home regimen to be vital in giving him space to explore, so he is developing an at-home protocol for individuals who have endured a spinal injury to understand their bodies in new ways. He absolutely intends to return to MIT when he feels his body is ready. Connect with him on his website, Facebook (fb.com/THEOvercoming1 or personal), and Instagram.

Living with Kidney Disease, I Revel in the Joyous Expectancy of the Good to Come

Melissa Tuff was diagnosed with kidney disease at age 16. She began dialysis at 17 and waited nine years for a lifesaving kidney transplant. After more than 10 years with her new kidney, she is back on dialysis. She is fundraising with Help Hope Live while awaiting a second transplant. Melissa partners with multiple organizations to increase organ donor awareness, influence legislation regarding end-stage renal disease, and support fellow kidney disease fighters.

We asked Melissa about her transplant journey and the driving forces behind her advocacy work on behalf of kidney transplant candidates and other patients across the country.

Melissa Tuff Help Hope Live

Help Hope Live patient Melissa Tuff is an advocate and volunteer


Is transplantation an emotional process?


I was 16 when I faced my first transplant. I was thrown into dialysis and the transplant process with absolutely no idea what to expect. It was a very scary and traumatizing experience for me. Now facing a second transplant, I have had time to absorb everything and have learned a lot from going through the process before, so I know what to expect. All the information I have gathered over the years helps me to process my emotions in a healthy way and allows me not to feel as overwhelmed as I have in the past.

Melissa Tuff Help Hope Live

Melissa documents her physical and emotional journey online

Going into the transplant process for a second time evoked a variety of emotions for me. There is the fear and apprehension of potentially having to return to a life of dialysis if I do not find a living donor; the frustration that my body is slowly rejecting my kidney and there is nothing I can do about it; the gratitude for my donor who has given me nearly 11 wonderful years of life free from “the machine”; the feelings of disappointment that there may have been something I could do differently to prevent rejection; the aggravation associated with the length of the process to get listed; and the annoyance of dealing with the hoops I have to jump through, the delays and the costs incurred.


What gives you strength on the waiting list?


My family has not been involved in my fundraising or health care, so I have relied strongly on my chosen family at the Center for Spiritual Living in Cape Coral and my acquaintances on social media to provide support throughout my journey. I honestly do not know what I would do without them! Their words of support and the people who hold my continued health in their prayers give me the strength to keep fighting on days when I just want to give up.


How do you serve as an advocate and volunteer to support other kidney disease patients?


I volunteer at LifeLink of Florida setting up and sitting at organ donor registration booths at public events, hospitals and fairs. I am a Peer Mentor for the National Kidney Foundation, offering a confidential space in which dialysis patients, transplant recipients and chronic kidney disease warriors can share their experience and receive guidance. I’m a member of the Kidney Advocacy Committee and a Region 4 Leader, helping to influence policies regionally and with a yearly trip to Washington, D.C.

I am also the Secretary for the Organ Transplant Recipients of Southwest Florida support and advocacy group. With quite a full plate, I am still taking on more opportunities to advocate! I will begin volunteering with the American Association of Kidney Patients soon.

Melissa Tuff Help Hope Live

Melissa petitions for positive changes to renal disease legislation


How did you find Help Hope Live?


I began fundraising to help with some of my health care expenses after I was let go due to my declining health. In summer 2012, I was balancing a medical assistant job with a customer service position at a local grocery store. I was exhausted all the time, but had no choice but to keep going to make ends meet. Through exhaustion and hemoglobin issues, I became dependent on blood transfusions, requiring two units of blood every two weeks. I developed another condition which required me to wear an IV at home 12 hours per day to remove the excess iron from the transfusions.

While I tried my best not to miss work days as I balanced my health and my financial needs, and even signed out of the hospital at times against medical device to avoid missing a shift, I was told by my managers that “my health had become an issue.” I was devastated. I loved my job and it gave me a sense of accomplishment to help and care for other patients.

Melissa Tuff Help Hope Live

Daily life with kidney disease made it impossible to maintain full-time work

What could have been a tragedy or a failure became an opportunity for me: I was free to do the advocacy and support work that I would be most appreciated for, which would be far more rewarding than any paycheck.

I started using GoFundMe because it was what everyone seemed to be using. It was mildly successful. Then I met with the Tampa General Hospital Transplant Team and was told that I would need to raise nearly $13,000 before I would even be considered as a candidate for the kidney transplant waitlist. I knew I needed help, and that’s when I found out about Help Hope Live.

Finding Help Hope Live and working directly with a Fundraising Coordinator has been a godsend. I received more donations within the first few months of setting up a Help Hope Live campaign than I had in over a year of fundraising on my own with GoFundMe. The fact that Help Hope Live is an established and trusted nonprofit organization made working with them a no-brainer! The staff is extremely helpful, supportive and attentive when assisting with questions related to my campaign, which is not something you can say about crowdfunding sites.

Melissa Tuff Help Hope Live

Melissa “received more donations with Help Hope Live” than with GoFundMe


What are you currently fundraising for?


A lot of testing and medical clearances are required before getting approved for the transplant list. Because I only have Medicare coverage, I have to pay 20% of whatever the test or office visit costs plus the physician’s fee. My expenses add up very quickly and can be overwhelming, which is why I thank God for the ability to submit bills to Help Hope Live that I cannot pay myself.

Help Hope Live has alleviated some of my worries regarding paying for the transplant and health care leading up to surgery. Now I am working on keeping my only source of transportation running so I can get to all of my appointments and, eventually, to Tampa for transplant.


What do you think is one of the biggest misconceptions about transplantation?


People see both dialysis and transplantation as cures when really they are both forms of treatment. A transplant is not a cure for the underlying condition. This misconception may be due to the fact that many recipients go back to work, travel or start or grow families after transplant. Most of us appear to “go back to normal” after receiving a transplant. But people don’t see the post-transplant medication regimens, treatments, follow-up appointments, fear of illness and rejection, health and life insurance struggles and, of course, the medical bills, which never stop. That is why fundraising and long-term financial planning are necessary.


What is your advice for someone facing the kidney transplant waiting list?


Be aggressive regarding your health care. No one can be a better advocate for you than you. Do not be afraid to question your health care providers to make sure they are willing to work with you rather than making decisions for you. Do your own research and discuss your findings with your providers. I have personally changed providers when I have found that they were not providing me with the level of care that I deserve.

When it comes to our lives, we cannot afford to put our health in someone else’s hands without taking some responsibility ourselves. The best way to ensure that you receive quality care is to speak up. Just like the saying goes, “The squeaky wheel gets the grease.”

“Speak up,” Melissa tells transplant patients, and “do your own research”


Why is advocacy important in your life?


It is extremely positive for anyone living with an illness or life-altering injury to advocate for related causes and participate in awareness events. Not only is it educational and inspirational to those you share your experiences with, but it is also therapeutic and rewarding for you as you talk about your life with others. My volunteer work in this area is something that I look forward to and it makes me feel like there is a purpose behind my condition.

Now that I fall into the “underinsured” category myself as a patient, I realize just how unfair it is. People who need lifesaving transplants have enough to worry about without having to be concerned about how they will be able to afford to stay alive. In many cases, these people are not well enough to work full time to receive private health care coverage, but they are not sick enough to qualify for government benefits. We are the ones who are forever stuck in a cycle of medical debt and struggles to get the coverage we need for a better quality of life.

Melissa Tuff Help Hope Live

Participate in advocacy can help you to feel educated, inspired and rewarded


What does Hope mean to you?


Hope to me is more than just a word. It is a way of life. What comes to mind is, “Hold Onto Prayer Every Day” which is exactly how I keep my cheerful disposition despite what I may be going through at any time. I live with the joyous expectancy of the good to come. To me, that is what hope is all about.

I know it can be hard to remain positive when things appear to be going wrong. But we are still alive, still here to love and be loved. We are stronger than what has tried to take us down. Treatments and medical advances are being made daily, and we are very lucky for that. My favorite quote from St. Francis of Assisi helps me a lot when I am at a loss: “Start by doing what’s necessary. Then do what’s possible. Suddenly, you are doing the impossible.”


If you would like to learn more about Melissa or potentially become a living donor to change her life, find her on Facebook or at www.MelNeedsAKidney.com.

Voices of Hope: Someone Strong to Lead the Way

On her blog Struggling with Serendipity, Cindy Kolbe documents the journey she and her daughter, Beth, took after Beth sustained a spinal cord injury in May 2000 at age 14.


I drove back from my son’s college concert near midnight. Exhausted, I glanced at my 14-year-old daughter, Beth, asleep in the passenger seat. We were only 10 minutes from home. I thought I could make it without falling asleep. Then I heard a road sign flatten on concrete. As the car flipped three times across a bare Ohio field, we left behind an ordinary life.

I escaped with cuts, bruises and blood-matted hair. Beth was another story. The car was cut open to rush her to a helicopter that would take her to the nearest hospital. A doctor in Toledo told my husband, John, that she was paralyzed. When he broke the news to Beth, she paused only a moment before simply responding, “Let’s talk about what I can do.”


Later, when I arrived, Beth lay flat in a maze of tubes and wires, her pretty face swollen, her neck in a brace. She greeted me with a small smile. Her usual upbeat attitude was muted but present–I should have felt gratitude for that, but I didn’t. In disbelief, I stared at the girl in the bed. How could she smile?

When Beth slept, a surgeon guided me to a chair. He was kind, but his words were devastating. The bones in her neck were shattered. After surgery, he told me that her spinal cord was severed at the C6-7 vertebrae. With all four of her limbs damaged, she was now a quadriplegic who would never walk.

The loss of hand function seemed especially cruel. Her fingers didn’t work and her muscles began to shrink (atrophy). Among many health risks, pneumonia stood out as a leading cause of death for quads—along with suicide.


With one mistake, I had hurt everyone I loved.

Whenever I closed my eyes, I saw the upside-down car and Beth slumped over her stomach on the ceiling, her neck at a disturbing angle. The image haunted me. How easy it would be to lose myself under a blanket of guilt. Instead, I focused on small moments. Beth needed me. I turned her to the side, straightened a sheet, adjusted a pillow, and stayed in sight. Sleepy, in a morphine haze, she told me, “I like it when you hold my hand.” Crying quietly, I could not make myself grateful for the partial feeling in her hands.


When Beth was transferred to rehab, we shared a room with a girl in a crib with high sides who made sad sounds. She was alone with a brain injury. We met a man with a spinal cord injury who needed a ventilator to breathe; he moved only his head. A teenager with paraplegia refused to get out of bed and moved to a nursing home; he had full use of his hands and arms.

As physical therapy started, Beth lay face down on her stomach, unable to lift her shoulders off the mat. Her body was moved for her. She had no strength. The therapy session finished with the difficult process of transferring her into a wheelchair. Beth opened her arms and I leaned into a hug. Her bent hand softly patted my back. Suddenly, I was grateful for arms and wrists that move. For lungs that breathe. For her ability to feel me pat her back in return.


After a month in rehab, Beth tried to sit up on the mat. She started on her back and concentrated on throwing one arm over the other to roll onto one side. It took several tries. She pushed down with her hands to raise her upper body incrementally to a shaky sitting position for the first time. Her body tottered back and forth in a battle of balance–Bambi on ice. My instincts screamed to help her, support her. Instead, I turned away to wipe my eyes.

She leaned forward and planted a hand on each side to steady herself. She looked up and smiled when she heard me clapping with the therapists. Even Beth seemed surprised by, and glad for, every small thing.


My daughter insisted on starting her freshman year of high school on time about three months after her injury. On the first day, she pushed herself slowly down the halls in a manual wheelchair. Four years later, she was able to independently care for herself and live in a dorm or apartment with no assistance, a rare feat for quads.


Beth’s attitude propelled her forward with me in tow. Little by little, I chipped away at my millstone of guilt. Sometimes we need someone strong to lead the way.

Now, all I see is what she can do.


Cindy Kolbe is a lifelong disability advocate who lives in Summerville, South Carolina. She managed group homes in Ohio and ran a nonprofit in Massachusetts. Her daughter Beth graduated from Harvard and Stanford Law and is employed as a health policy lawyer in Washington, D.C. Access her Blog and reach her via email.

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You Made Hope Happen in 2016

We know that when you donate to support our mission, you may not always see the direct impact of those dollars. And as a member of the Help Hope Live community, you may not realize how your efforts spark change and inspire action in others.

That’s why we’ve put together this post–to show friends like you how you make a positive difference, every single day, by being part of the Help Hope Live family. Your time and effort added up to some big numbers with huge impact in Fiscal Year 2016.

Help Hope Live logo


Last year, you helped:


Launch 732 new medical fundraising campaigns

Provide $9.3 million to help cover vital medical and related expenses

Support the needs of 1,400 patients and families facing the most difficult challenge of their lives: a lifesaving transplant or a life-changing catastrophic injury or illness.

But you didn’t stop there…


You also helped:


Crush 4,942 medical fundraising goals

Plan 550 gatherings of hope nationwide

Inspire 2,451 words of gratitude

Provide 57 emergency assistance grants to help families avoid an immediate medical crisis

Honor 25 loved ones’ legacies, and

Joined a community of 3,224 empowered and compassionate friends and neighbors


Families across the country felt the tangible impact. 16 Help Hope Live patients reported finding a “new normal” after a devastating medical crisis altered their lives.

“Thanks to so many wonderful people, my family and I have reached our Help Hope Live goal for my double lung transplant recovery. We have no idea what the future will bring, but hopefully, I will continue getting stronger every day. I cherish breathing.”

Bob Wollenberg Help Hope Live

Bob Wollenberg, Great Lakes Lung Transplant Fund


10 patients reached a major independence milestone after a catastrophic injury, from going to college to driving and living independently.

“Alex’s physical therapy sessions are two hours and he enjoys every minute of it! He loves traveling wherever his [new] vehicle takes him.” He is pictured below with wife, Marina: “A new chapter is beginning for two deserving young people who have overcome so much.”

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Alex Paul, Northeast Spinal Cord Injury Fund


To us, these aren’t just numbers. They are symbols of hope in the midst of extremely challenging circumstances.

When you engage with Help Hope Live as a donor, patient, or volunteer, you are shouting hope from the rooftops. You are refusing to let a medical crisis dominate the course of a life. You are defying the negative noise the world throws at you by taking a stand for strong, loving communities and life-changing new beginnings. You are telling someone, “You matter. Your voice is heard. Your story is my story, too.

That’s what it really means to help hope live. Never stop: the world needs you, and so do we.


Keep hope alive in 2017!


Click here to make a one-time or recurring donation to our nonprofit to keep our mission strong in 2017 and beyond. And from all of us…thank you!

How to Promote Your Cause Like a Marketing Genius

Mana Ionescu is the president of the Chicago digital marketing agency Lightspan Digital. She explains how we can use digital storytelling and a few social media best practices to promote a HelpHOPELive campaign.

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“I’ve always been interested in how people get their information, and particularly how we interpret what we see and hear in the media. I studied the subject in grad school. My fascination with how we create and share stories led me to marketing. With the rise of online communication, digital storytelling took the lead as one of the most powerful marketing strategies.


Grow Your Network


Social sharing can be an effective way to market your cause. But first things first, you need to decide if you’re ready to share your Facebook page (and your cause) with some of the people you may not already have connected with on the platform. If you are comfortable with the crossover between your personal life and your cause, sync your Facebook account with your email address book and invite people you know to connect.

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Sync your Facebook account with your email address book to find new followers

The best way to grow a following is to first follow other people. A certain percentage of those will always follow you back. Over time, you can unfollow those who aren’t receptive.


Make a Plan and Don’t Believe the Hype


What you’re looking for is a strategy and a plan. Just posting on Facebook may not be your first and only solution for outreach. If you think narrowly like that, you’re limiting yourself and your possibilities and the odds are that you’re not going to get the most out of marketing.

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Do you have an engagement roadmap, or are you lost in the woods?

We get sucked into time-consuming discussions about vague concepts and buzzwords. “Engagement” is one of those. Recently, the term “content curation” is taking over. You have to dig deeper than that to get results from social sharing. There is no simple formula. There’s a lot of wasteful outreach out there, marketing that is not done with purpose.


Strengthen Your Strategy


Just posting on Facebook won’t get you extra support. You need to engage your donor base to share your messages with their friends. Use social media as a catalyst for your existing fans to get your messages out.

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What kind of posts do your followers respond to most?

Craft different stories around the call for donations, and play with the calls to action. For example, “Donate” is the most commonly used call to action. But A/B tests show that “Give” may actually be more effective language. You can also use terms like “Contribute” or “Participate” or “Join Me” to ask for donations. Vary your calls to action for best results.


Keep It Classy – Or Else


I’ve known a person who, for years, posted negative things about her employers to her personal Facebook account. One day in a meeting, a business owner shared that “negative Nellie” applied for a job with the company but she was passed over because of her history of negative posts.

Remember that you are under the microscope. Whether you like it or not, you are now a representative of your cause, even when you are “off the clock.” Do not post mean-spirited posts from your personal account. Keep it clean.


The Bottom Line: Creative Connection


Storytelling is about sharing experiences, and that’s how people come together: through shared experiences that elicit emotions. You have to communicate, communicate, communicate. Share your stories AND the stories of others who support you. Make it all about people. Figure out how to motivate your supporters to bring in more supporters, whether it’s through a creative contest or an emotional tug.

Digital marketing pushes you to be social. It’s a very people-focused space. That’s thrilling to me, because I love getting to know people and learning from others.”


Mana is the president of Lightspan Digital, a Chicago digital marketing agency. Connect with her on Twitter and on LinkedIn.