Caring for Caregivers: Unsung Heroes of Health Care

We are proud to assist family caregivers during National Family Caregivers Month and throughout the year by helping individuals facing a medical crisis fundraise for their out-of-pocket costs, including caregiving expenses. This post from our friends at the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance highlights how caregivers can care for themselves, too.


graphic-caregiving

November marked National Family Caregivers Month, a time to celebrate the silent givers behind those who need care. It is a month to show support for the tireless work caregivers put in for their loved ones. This year, President Obama released a presidential proclamation stating, “During National Family Caregivers Month, we reaffirm our support for those who give of themselves to be there for their family, friends, and neighbors in challenging times…” Caregivers are often the unsung heroes of home health care, so during the month of November and all year round, we raise awareness for these caring individuals and the issues and hardships they face.. It is a time to celebrate the selfless work caregivers do and provide our support.

Twenty-three percent of family caregivers who have been caring for their loved ones for five or more years report that their current health is fair or poor. More than 65 million people, or about 29% of the United States population, provide care for someone who is aging, chronically ill or living with a disability. They are spending an average of 20 hours every single week caring for their loved one. There is little wiggle room for “sick time,” vacations, or paid time off. Caregivers are often bound to a schedule that they must adhere to for the sake of somebody else’s health.

This information has inspired the Caregiver Action Network 2016 National Family Caregivers Month slogan, “Take care to give care.” It signifies that before you can take care of someone else, you must first take care of yourself. To better care for yourself as a caregiver, you can follow some of the tips provided by the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance:


Do what you love.


Don’t neglect your own personal life to care for somebody else. Maintain relationships with friends and family. Set time aside to do activities that you enjoy! Even if you must schedule time on your calendar, it’s important to take time for yourself. It’s particularly helpful to take time doing activities that you like and ones that help you relax! Everyone needs a mental and physical break now and then.


Be heard.


Cameron Von St. James, caregiver to his wife, Heather, who is a 10-year mesothelioma survivor (click here to learn more about mesothelioma), offers these insights: if you know a caregiver, offer him or her your ear – someone to talk to. Caregiving can be stressful, so having someone to talk to helps. It helps caregivers to feel socially connected and reminds the caregiver that there are people who care about them.


Know your limits. 


Always remember that there are limits to what you can do as a caregiver. Set realistic limits for yourself and communicate those to your support system. Don’t be afraid to reach out to those around you for help and support.


Focus on your health and well-being. 


Get plenty of sleep, maintain a well-balanced diet and be sure to get exercise. Your health is crucial. It won’t be possible to care for your loved one to the best of your ability if your health and well-being are suffering. Be sure to visit your doctor regularly for checkups, and schedule an appointment if you are sick.


This guest post was provided by the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance to support caregivers across the country. Want additional information on what it means to be a caregiver? Check out our archived Blog posts.

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