Tag Archives: catastrophic illness

May is National Mobility Awareness Month!

Why #MobilityMatters

When you hear the word mobility, what comes to mind?

If you live with a catastrophic injury or illness that impedes your ability to move freely, you already know that mobility is more than just a concept. It’s a word that is closely tied to some of life’s biggest milestones and pursuits.

Chris Arbini Help Hope Live

Living with an injury or illness, mobility can change your life

Each May, we celebrate why #MobilityMatters to thousands of Help Hope Live patients, their families, caregivers, and medical professionals.

When we talk about mobility, we’re referring to far more than walking, reaching, and running. Mobility is a broad term for activities, therapies, and technologies that can add meaning and independence to our lives after injury or illness . Here are some examples.


Mobility is…


wheelchairs and power chairs that are must-have sources of mobility support.

physical therapy or exercise-based rehabilitation that increases or helps you to retain your balance, range of motion, and strength.

home renovations that make it possible to live and move comfortably in your own house.

accessible transportation that puts careers, college, social events, and medical travel within reach.

medications and ongoing medical care that safeguard or increase your motion.


Why #MobilityMatters to Me


Paul Mustol Help Hope Live

Paul participates in physical therapy

“Spring is here and we are taking one day at a time with Paul. The steroids have really helped him maintain his abilities, for which we are thankful. Physical therapy sessions in a pool provide good, low-impact exercise for his muscles and lungs.

Paul’s neurologist is recommending a motorized wheelchair with good back support that would be custom-fitted for Paul. A scooter would allow him to be more flexible and it would be easier to transport. We will take time to consider the choices.”

Paul Mustol, South-Central Catastrophic Illness Fund

Living with the genetic disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy


Molei Wright Help Hope Live

Molei can regain mobility through therapy

“Molei has been through a lot and survived it all – a near fatal accident, a three-month coma, five months in the hospital, and uncountable setbacks along the way. Her insurance stopped covering her care about four months ago. Now, she is unable to participate in speech, occupational and physical therapy. She can learn to walk, speak, and eat well again, but only with the help of professional therapists.”

Molei Wright, Midwest/West Traumatic Brain Injury Fund

Traumatic brain injury in January 2016


Chris Arbini Help Hope Live

Chris is dedicated to physical therapy and regular exercise

“Chris has been able to go to Craig Rehab for some physical therapy, as well as workouts in their gym. The exercise has been great not only for his body, but for his morale as well.

Chris started a three-month program at Craig Rehab called NeuroRecovery Network (or NRN) which is a program developed by the Christopher Reeve Foundation. In the actual program, they connect him to electrical stimulation while training him to perform various functions. While I was there, they were working on retraining his hands to grasp.

Something that he plans on offsetting through fundraising is an FES bike, which sends electrical currents to the legs as it spins to promote circulation and provide nerve stimulation. He has been using it for 45 minutes to an hour each day, but since his access to outpatient care will ultimately be limited by insurance, having an FES bike at home will help him tremendously. This bike is close to $20,000 out-of-pocket.”

Chris Arbini, Midwest/West Spinal Cord Injury Fund

Spinal cord injury in July 2016


Scarlett Chandler Help Hope Live

Greater mobility means more independence for Scarlett

A van would make everyday tasks much easier. My mom had surgery before I started fundraising, and she was on her back for weeks and unable to drive. It would have made such a difference if I could hop in a van and pick up groceries and prescriptions. I want to be able to provide that for my family.

A van would also help me to attend college classes to I can secure employment. I fundraise to offset the cost of the van as well as specialized adaptive driving classes.”

Scarlett Chandler, Southeast Catastrophic Illness Fund

Living with the spinal cord defect spina bifida


Even With Insurance, Mobility Isn’t Free


Mobility-related expenses can become financially devastating to families. In fact:

  • Major home modifications for mobility can easily exceed $100,000 out-of-pocket.
  • An adapted vehicle could cost you over $50,000.
  • Physical therapy may not be covered by insurance at all, leaving you with an out-of-pocket price tag of $20,000 or more annually.

Tell Us Why #MobilityMatters!


We feature your stories and insights on our Blog every year during Mobility Awareness Month. Send your #MobilityMatters stories, pics, or videos to us at [email protected] and you could be featured in an upcoming post. You can take part as a Help Hope Live patient, family member, caregiver, spouse, friend, or medical professional.

Mobility Matters: How To Get The Equipment You Need

If your family has been affected by a catastrophic injury or illness, it can be a challenge to cover the costs associated with mobility and quality of life. Fundraising can help you offset the out-of-pocket expenses that come with a disabling injury or illness so you and your family can have a brighter and more mobile future.


What Our Nonprofit Can Do For You


If you are coping with a spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke or a catastrophic illness that affects mobility, we can help you rally your community to raise funds, providing tailored support from one of our expert Fundraising Coordinators. There’s a reason families choose HelpHOPELive over crowdfunding platforms. In addition to one-on-one guidance, HelpHOPELive offers other unique advantages:

  • Nonprofit Status (receive tax deductible donations and corporate and matching grants);
  • Online Donation Page;
  • Bill Pay Support and more.

Mobility expenses are costly. After a spinal cord injury, families may be responsible for $480,000 to $985,000 or more within the first year alone. Lifetime costs associated with an injury range from $500,000 to $3 million depending on severity. Here are just a few of the mobility-related expenses you may want to fundraise for:

  • Health insurance premiums, deductibles and co-pays
  • Medications
  • Travel expenses and temporary relocation costs for rehabilitation and treatment
  • Home medical equipment
  • Home modifications for accessibility
  • Home health care services and caregiving
  • Physical therapy and vocational rehabilitation
  • Experimental treatment

the cost of a spinal cord injury


For people who are living with a catastrophic illness or injury, challenges associated with uncovered medical expenses last a lifetime. HelpHOPELive is often able to help families over many months or years as they face long-term challenges with uncovered medical expenses.

Richard Travia Katie Travia HelpHOPELive

Don’t let expenses hold you back as your life moves forward

Many of our clients offset the cost of their ongoing mobility essentials through annual community events planned with our fundraising expertise. For example:

With an annual Curlathon entering its tenth year, Jeff Harris gives his community a tangible way to contribute to the expenses that allow him to remain independent, including home health care and accessible transportation.

A yearly spaghetti dinner fundraiser helps Aaron Teel continue the rehabilitation that will help him “play soccer, surf, golf, snowboard, skateboard” and improve his quality of life.

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Our Partnership With NMEDA


If your goal is to fundraise for an accessible vehicle, you may qualify for a campaign under our partnership with the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA). As NMEDA CEO Dave Hubbard observed, “Sometimes, the barrier to an automotive mobility solution is a gap in funding.”

Mobility Awareness Month NMEDA

NMEDA established National Mobility Awareness Month (celebrated every May) as an opportunity to raise awareness about why mobility matters and encourage families to learn how they can secure the accessible transportation they need. Through our partnership, we hope to help families across the country experience greater freedom and mobility than ever before.


Voices Of Hope: Jacob Gets His Van


Joining forces with NMEDA is more than just a partnership on paper for our organization: just ask the family of Jacob Norwood. Jacob is a 12-year-old living with FOXG1 Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that causes both physical and cognitive delays (Jacob is one of only 159 known cases of this disorder in the world). Non-mobile, non-verbal and legally blind, Jacob requires full-time care and an assortment of medical supplies to stay healthy.

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Jacob’s family entered the NMEDA Local Heroes competition to win an accessible van that would lift a considerable financial burden off their shoulders. When the contest ended without a win for the Norwoods, they decided to fundraise with HelpHOPELive to make their mobility dream a reality.

With community support and fundraising guidance, the Norwood family was able to raise more than $40,000 and cover the cost of an accessible 2015 Dodge Caravan to help transport Jacob into town, to the park and to medical appointments. As Jacob’s mother, Heather, explained to a local news station, “He is going to be able to have fun and we are going to be able to be a family [with the van]. I still shake my head in disbelief about what we have been able to accomplish and the support that we have.”


Get Started!


Need help covering the out-of-pocket costs associated with vital mobility expenses? Start a fundraising campaign with HelpHOPELive. We’re proud to provide nonprofit accountability and one-on-one fundraising support to help keep you mobile.

Life With A Rare Disease For 7-Year-Old Paul Mustol

At 6 years old, Paul Mustol was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Paul’s family began fundraising with HelpHOPELive in October 2015. Here is a look at life with DMD as told by Paul’s mother, Anna.

Anna and Paul Mustol HelpHOPELive

Paul with his mother, Anna


Describe a day in Paul’s life.


The morning begins with Paul calling to us to remove his nightly leg splints. We carry him downstairs. He takes two medications and several vitamin supplements with his breakfast. He needs assistance getting dressed. A special needs school bus arrives and Paul is loaded on the bus using a lift to avoid straining his legs.

Once he gets to school, he needs to rest before he does his work with the other students in his class. He needs extra help staying focused and understanding assignments. On a weekly basis, he receives therapy from a physical therapist, occupational therapist and speech therapist.

At dinner, he takes a few more vitamins. We practice deep breathing to keep his breathing muscles strong. We stretch and massage his muscles to reduce muscle contractures. We put the splints back on his legs to stretch them during the night.

Mustol family HelpHOPELive

“We…just try to enjoy each day,” says mom, Anna


What’s the most difficult part of the day?


The most challenging part of each day is at the end of the day when Paul is tired and weak. Instead of running around or riding a bike outside with friends, he is exhausted. It is a reminder of what he will face in the future.

We try not to focus on all the difficulties to come, but instead just try to enjoy each day. We want to appreciate the time we have together. It is uplifting to see how Paul has persevered with a smile on his face through the tumult of the last five months since the diagnosis. We feel blessed by the support and love coming from our family, friends and church community. From the minute we shared his diagnosis, people have offered help and have clearly shown us that we are not alone.


What does hope mean to you?


Hope cannot be taken away by a disease. A disease may shorten a life or make it more challenging, but it does not take away the value of that life. We have hopes for him and for his life. We hope that he can see his life as an opportunity to make a positive impact on those around him. We hope that through his disease, he can teach others about perseverance and overcoming obstacles. Of course, we always hope for a cure for DMD.

Paul Mustol HelpHOPELive Duchenne muscular dystrophy

“Hope cannot be taken away by a disease.”


What do you fundraise for?


The average annual cost per person living with DMD is over $50,000. When we first received our son’s diagnosis, we had no idea of the cost involved. Even though it is a genetic disorder, no one in my family had ever received the diagnosis before; it can occur as the result of a spontaneous mutation. Health insurance covers some of the cost, but many expenses are only covered after we meet a high deductible.

We will always need to cover the cost of daily medications, weekly therapy sessions and doctor appointments. He needs tests like echocardiograms or pulmonary functioning tests from time to time as DMD weakens his heart and breathing muscles. Every six months, we travel to the certified DMD care clinic, which is out of our home state.


How will Paul’s needs change in the future?


Because DMD is a degenerative disease, my son’s needs will increase dramatically with time. He will need a power wheelchair full time and an accessible van and home if he loses function in his arms, hands or legs. He may also face surgeries for bone fractures and scoliosis. Eventually, he will need machines to help with breathing and palliative care. The average life expectancy for people living with DMD is around 25 years, but the type of medical care one receives can make a big difference. Today there are more and more cases of people living with DMD living into their early 30s thanks to medical advancements.


How can we recognize Rare Disease Day in honor of Paul?


Think of someone you know in your community that has a disability or is sick. Find a way to show him or her kindness, whether through an act of service or just through a conversation. See the individual as valuable and important; don’t just see his or her disease. If the person wants to share his or her experience with the disease, listen and educate yourself. Ask how he or she is doing, and listen for more than just a standard quick response. If you are able, share your contact information and indicate that you are available to help if the need arises.

Paul Mustol HelpHOPELive muscular dystrophy

Celebrate Rare Disease Day in honor of Paul

The more attention rare diseases get, the more likely it is that researchers and pharmaceutical companies will investigate ways of treating these diseases. Awareness and knowledge also allows for earlier detection and diagnosis.


Follow Paul’s journey with DMD or donate in his honor on his HelpHOPELive Campaign Page. If you or someone you love is living with a rare disease or other catastrophic illness, start a fundraising campaign with our nonprofit to help offset medical and related expenses.

Voices of Hope: Living Well With A Chronic Illness

Anna Crum was in junior high school when she began to experience persistent double vision and sixth cranial nerve palsy in her left eye. An MRI revealed that Anna was fighting relapsing and remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Anna explains how she holds onto hope while fighting the debilitating mental and physical effects of RRMS.

Anna Crum MS HelpHOPELive

Anna Crum is living with multiple sclerosis.


How do your RRMS symptoms disrupt your daily life?


Shortly after the diagnosis, I became legally blind and had to learn to read Braille and rely on a cane for mobility. My current list of symptoms has grown to include a different diplopia (double vision) in each eye, color discrepancy, contrast loss, nerve pain on the left side of my face, muscle weakness in my left leg, short-term memory difficulties, fatigue, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and the occasional slurred speech. Without special lenses, I would not be able to read or drive.

My symptoms are unpredictable. On a given day, there is a long list of things that can go wrong. But you try to plan and compensate as best you can to hopefully manage some of the more severe symptoms to prevent them from hindering your daily life.


What has been the most difficult part of your struggle with RRMS?


MS finds a way to keep chipping away at your independence. In my case, it took everything I had to make it through college. Despite my success, I am now living back at home, unable to work full time and leaning on family for support. MS forces you to reach out. Admitting you need help and accepting it can be very difficult, especially if you are naturally an introverted person who is goal-driven and independent.


Why do you think people with MS sometimes hide their illness from the world?


You encounter enough people who don’t understand and eventually you learn to blend in. I have many times described myself as an illusionist and I am sure other people living with chronic illnesses can relate. People don’t see the preparation or the aftermath.

Everything in my life has become so calculated. I plan how much walking I will need to do in a day, how many hours of energy I have, how much my eyes can handle or how much pain I can tolerate ahead of time. Everything is staged. Seldom do I let people see the daily struggle [and] the days where I can’t even get out of bed.


Do you have a resolution for 2016?


This year, I am focusing on transparency, community and relationships. The National MS Society has a saying: “Multiple sclerosis destroys connections inside us. It disconnects the mind from the body and people from each other.” Too often, people with a chronic illness suffer in silence. When I was first diagnosed, I started advocating for awareness. It was a passion of mine. But eventually I lost the energy. All the energy I had focused on just surviving. Eventually I chose silence for security and traded my voice for a disguise in an attempt to mask my disease.

This year, I want to use my voice again; I want to make an impact. Hopefully my journey will help inspire someone else to keep pushing through. Too often those suffering wait until it’s dire before they reach out for help. Keeping the disease invisible gives it that much more power and it confines you. I want to inspire someone, somewhere, to not give up.


Why do you plan to embrace your MS this year?


At times it feels like a door slams in your face everywhere you turn, but you keep going, one step at a time. Eventually, MS gave me a new path. Because of my disease, I found a passion and hopefully an eventual career as a dietitian. I want to help others manage their symptoms as best as possible, improve their quality of life, and help them learn to thrive despite an illness. Nutrition isn’t a cure, but it can make a huge impact.

Anna Crum HelpHOPELive nutrition

Anna plans to help people with MS manage their nutrition.


What advice can you give to someone newly diagnosed with MS?

Make your health your number one priority. I paid dearly for the instances where my priority became school or some other goal where I pushed myself too hard. Don’t push yourself to go at anyone else’s pace or to meet anyone else’s expectations.

Focusing on what you stand to lose or have lost is too overwhelming. Instead, focus on what your disease adds to your life. This disease builds character, teaches resourcefulness, ingenuity, adaptability, resilience, and gives you a unique perspective. You are stronger than you know, and maybe you can inspire someone with your unique story to find their own strength. Focus on what keeps you hopeful, and hold onto your tenacity.


What does hope mean to you?

To me, hope encompasses endless possibilities. There are always new ways to adapt, a new perspective to discover, new lessons to learn, new relationships to form. There is ALWAYS a reason to keep persevering.


Anna is currently studying to become a registered dietitian and is working on a photography project on the invisible symptoms of MS. She is fundraising with HelpHOPELive for a stem cell transplant that could improve her life with RRMS.

Meet Live Award Honoree Aaron Loy

We present our 2015 Live award to HelpHOPELive client Aaron Loy for inspiration after illness following a double amputation after severe complications from bacterial meningitis.

In 2013, Aaron Loy was a dedicated student and a passionate athlete who enjoyed lacrosse, soccer, surfing and biking. As a freshman at the University of California Santa Barbara, Aaron was suddenly diagnosed with an aggressive strain of bacterial meningitis with no U.S.-approved vaccine. The disease progressed rapidly, causing a blood infection and severe internal complications.

Three other university students recovered from the meningitis outbreak with no permanent damage. Aaron’s illness took a different course. Doctors were able to save Aaron and provide antibiotics to eradicate the illness, but only after amputating both of his lower legs.

Aaron Loy prosthetics meningitis

Aaron Loy lost his legs to bacterial meningitis. Picture courtesy of the LA Times.

Watching his own story covered on the news, Aaron recalls lying in the hospital in a state of shock, thinking, “No, I don’t think this is real…I don’t want this to be true.” The catastrophic event shook Aaron and his community to the core. Family members and classmates from Aaron’s hometown and the University of California Santa Barbara community immediately turned to HelpHOPELive to help cover his pressing medical expenses, including co-pays, prosthetics and intensive physical rehabilitation.

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Friends planned dozens of fundraisers from percentage of sales nights to bake sales and car washes. In December of 2013, supporters from Aaron’s home lacrosse team organized the Aaron Loy Lacrosse Shootout, an all-ages event that invited 300 players to complete in honor of Aaron. The event raised more than $18,000 towards Aaron’s medical bills.

Discharged after three months in the hospital, Aaron was too weak to maneuver his own wheelchair. But he set his sights on a formidable goal: regaining his independence by literally getting back on his feet. Aaron took his first steps in prosthetic legs in March of 2014. He continued to practice diligently, improving his strength and coordination at prosthetic therapy sessions three to five times each week.

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Within a year of his diagnosis, Aaron had fought his way to a fulfilling and independent life that included returning to college 200 miles away from his home community, biking to class and hanging out with his friends. And he’s not done yet: Aaron plans to get back on the lacrosse field, go snowboarding and devote his time to helping others who have experienced catastrophic injuries to defy the odds.

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“He gets up every day with a smile on his face, puts his legs on and just carries on,” his mother, Kirsten, told NBC San Diego in 2014. “While his body recovers, his spirits and optimism remain high.”

Image courtesy of the LA Times.

Aaron lives with grace and motivation after illness. Image courtesy of the LA Times.

help-hope-live-it-upThe Live award will be presented to Aaron at this year’s HelpHOPE-Live it Up! benefit on October 16.

Learn more about Aaron.

Each year at HelpHOPELive’s annual signature fundraising event, HelpHOPE-Live It Up!, we honor community heroes who prove why our mission matters with the Help, HOPE and Live awards. In 2015, we’re also giving out an Advocacy and Volunteer of the Year award.

Nick’s Fight Against Aplastic Anemia

Nick Karavite was diagnosed with a rare blood disease called aplastic anemia at age 13. His bone marrow stopped producing enough vital blood cell varieties which caused his immune system to attack itself. Nick’s treatment included extended hospital stays and testing, chemotherapy and, finally, a bone marrow transplant from his 6-year-old sister, Mandy, exactly one year ago today. We spoke to Nick and his mother, Pam, about his transplant journey.

Mandy Karavite chemotherapy Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

Nick encourages everyone to sign up as a bone marrow donor.


Walk us through the first few days.


Pam: To be honest, everything happened so fast that none of us had much time to process it. One day Nick was pitching a no-hitter, and the next day he had red spots all over him, a fever and exhaustion. I took him to the pediatrician and they did blood work and immediately sent us to the hospital. We were met by an entourage of doctors and nurses and escorted right to another room – no E.R., no waiting room. By the next morning, a bone marrow biopsy was performed and he was diagnosed with aplastic anemia.

We went from a routine visit to the pediatrician on Monday to hearing that our son could die on Wednesday. There just wasn’t any time to think, just react.


How much did you know about aplastic anemia when you were first diagnosed?


Nick: I didn’t know anything about aplastic anemia, and I had never heard of the disease before. In fact, nobody in my family had any experience with the disease. Even though I knew nothing at the beginning, I could probably tell you everything about the whole process at this point!

HelpHOPELive: Aplastic anemia is a rare disorder that causes an individual’s immune system to attack and destroy the body’s bone marrow. Fewer than 1,000 cases are diagnosed annually in the U.S. It is uncertain what causes aplastic anemia to occur.

hospital Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

Post-diagnosis, Nick spent extensive amounts of time in the hospital.


Was your family worried about you?


Nick: Yes, my family members were very worried. My mom would think about it every single night as she watched me sleep – she wanted to change places with me. But they didn’t let that worry get in the way. The same goes for my friends. Instead of overloading me with questions about it, they just cared for me.

Pam: We had our moments (I call them 80/20 days). Nick’s doctor told us that even with his sister, Mandy, as a bone marrow match, his chance of survival was 80%. I had days where I couldn’t shake the 20%. Once, I was packing a bag in Nick’s closet before heading back to the hospital and I had a vision of packing up his closet for good. I fell apart, began sobbing, sniffing his clothes, falling to my knees and begging God to leave my son here. I started calling them ‘closet moments’ – if I ever needed to cry, I would go find a closet so that Nick never knew.

Make A Wish Pamela Karavite Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

One year ago today, Nick gives his mother a Make A Wish medal.


Were you scared?


Nick: I wasn’t too scared, because I honestly didn’t know what was going to happen. I was learning more about the condition and focusing on what needed to happen next. I guess there is mild, moderate and severe aplastic anemia. I had severe aplastic anemia, but my parents never shared that or my survival odds with me until after I made it through.


What helped your family remain positive?


Pam: We were united in our common love for Nick, but I feel we remained positive because of God’s hand in things. I spent a lot of nights watching Nick sleep, wondering why this was happening. I still am not clear as to the “why,” but I am sure that God had a hand in preparing us for this battle for three reasons.

First, five years ago, God blessed us with the surprise of Mandy, who ended up being Nick’s ideal bone marrow match. Second, I had started work on my Masters in Special Education before Nick’s diagnosis, which equipped me perfectly to home school Nick for three quarters of his 8th grade year while he pursued treatment. Third, we moved our children to a different school district prior to his diagnosis, and the support of this new community became a true lifeline for our family when Nick was diagnosed.

hospital bed Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

The Karavite family sought to stay positive
throughout treatment.

The community really rallied to keep us lifted. Local parents put us in touch with HelpHOPELive, helped us cook meals and clean and held fundraisers in Nick’s honor. His peers at school even donated their allowance to his campaign. Teachers went above and beyond for Nick – his basketball coach gave him an honorary spot on the team even though he wouldn’t be able to play. Based on all we were armed with for this fight, it was hard not to remain positive.


Was fundraising an important part of the journey?


Pam: Fundraising was a HUGE part of our journey. The money raised through HelpHOPELive helped with anything insurance didn’t cover; the greatest help was when it allowed us to relocate for Nick’s hospital stay. One of the smartest things we did was to keep our family together: from the very beginning, I knew we needed to be at Nick’s side at the hospital 24/7. I knew we had Nick, the sick boy; Mandy, the donor; and two other boys that could potentially get lost in the shuffle. We agreed that keeping together was the best way to maintain some kind of ‘normal’.

Because of the help we received via donations from family and friends, one of us was able to be at Nick’s side every step of the way, and the other parent could be with our other children to provide them with ‘normal’ family time. Our psychologist has since told us that this one act, keeping our family together, was instrumental in getting us through this journey with the least amount of upheaval. Fundraising made that possible for us.

wheelchair friends family Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

Family and friends provided support and fundraising help.


What was the treatment like?


Nick: I went through a few treatments and then chemotherapy. I didn’t realize how sick it would make me. I got chemo for four days. Every night, all I could think about was being one day closer to going home again.

The bone marrow transplant only took a couple of hours, but I had to stay in the hospital for a month afterwards. A lot of people brought me games and things to do in the hospital to pass the time. I wasn’t able to eat for the first two weeks! The doctors wanted me to fill up on protein, but until I could get there, I had to get liquid nutrients through an IV for every single meal to stay healthy. I have a few scars from the treatment process.


What three words would you use to describe how it feels to go through diagnosis and treatment?


Nick: Scary. Unknowing. Shocked.

Nick Karavite aplastic anemia chemotherapy bone marrow transplant

Nick endured chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant.


What advice would you give to another family that is facing a battle with aplastic anemia?


Pam: Well, there is always the obvious: stay off the Internet! I didn’t allow myself to look at how awful this disease can be until after I felt good about where Nick was in his treatment. But my central piece of advice is this: accept help. I can be terrible at doing this myself, but the help we received SAVED us. It is a very humbling experience but a very necessary piece to surviving such a trying ordeal. The emotional scars are certainly here to stay for all of us, but I can honestly say they would be far worse had we not accepted the help everyone so willingly offered.


What do you think everyone out there should know about aplastic anemia or becoming a bone marrow donor?


Nick: They should know that the treatment process is a lot harder than it sounds. Even though it’s not cancer, aplastic anemia can be harder to treat than leukemia.

The chances of living with aplastic anemia without a donor are 50%. It goes up to 80% with a donor. Not only that, but the bone marrow donation process is pretty much painless – all they do is put an IV in you and put you to sleep, then take your bone marrow. The donor’s cells replenish themselves in 4 to 6 weeks.

Mandy Karavite bone marrow donor donationNick Karavite aplastic anemia

Nick received bone marrow from his younger sister, Mandy.

My 6-year-old sister was my donor, and her least favorite part was the over-the-counter medicine she took after the procedure – she didn’t like the taste of it! She was able to keep going with her life right after the procedure. She was out swimming the next day!

Everyone should sign up to be a bone marrow donor. All you have to do is sign up, swab your cheeks and that’s it, and you can save a life.


You just graduated from eighth grade. What are you looking forward to in high school?


Nick: I’m excited about starting a few different classes like biology and math. Science and math are my best subjects. I’ll also have about 15 of my friends starting high school with me.

Pamela Karavite Nick Karavite aplastic anemia recovery graduation eighth grade

Nick graduated from eighth grade with his mom by his side.


What do you want to be when you grow up?


Nick: I love baseball and I would definitely like to play baseball professionally, but I know that might be a long shot. After going through this treatment, one of my career goals is to be an anesthesiologist. Whenever I had a surgery or treatment, I would ask about anesthesia and being an anesthesiologist. It’s a really interesting system. It puts you to sleep very fast! That was a memorable experience.


Baseball is one of your favorite pastimes. What is it that you love about the game?


Nick: I like hitting, pitching, fielding, playing on a team, all of it! I’ve been playing baseball since I was four and started off with tee-ball. My favorite professional teams are the Cubs and Tigers. I’ve been to a Tigers game before. My favorite pitcher is David Price, who pitches for the Tigers. He’s a leftie like me, and he’s a good pitcher.

Nick Karavite baseball bat hospital aplastic anemia

Nick loves to play baseball.


What’s your best pitch?


Nick: Every pitch is my best pitch!


Thank you for the great conversation, Nick and Pam. To learn more about Nick or donate to HelpHOPELive in his honor, visit his Campaign Page.