Tag Archives: compassion

Has Fundraising Helped You? You Can Pay It Forward!

Has fundraising had a positive impact on your life? You have an opportunity to give back to your community and support other families facing a medical crisis. Last week, we featured Danielle Bailey, who has helped several local families kick-start their fundraising efforts with HelpHOPELive. This week, we feature five tried-and-true ways to start making a difference today.

pay it forward


…supporting families who are going through a similar situation.


You can help families navigate through the same challenges you’ve overcome. As heart transplant recipient Rick Brittell explains, “Before I got my heart, I was so tired of being away from home and isolated. Then my social worker reached out and asked if [my wife and I] would be willing to meet with a patient at the hospital who was facing a similar situation. We began to focus on supporting others. We started a support group in the local area that was open to lung and heart transplant candidates and recipients, caregivers and people who were grieving.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

You can be a vital source of support for another family.

Rick notes that this kind of support can make a tangible difference in someone’s life: “The doctors have said to us, ’You don’t know how much of a difference you have made.’ They even told us that people are being released 3-4 days earlier than average now that we are there to provide support!


…referring families to HelpHOPELive for nonprofit fundraising support.


Do you know someone who needs help fundraising for medical and related expenses? Help him or her understand how HelpHOPELive can help. Point other families in need to helphopelive.org for more information. If you would like additional resources to share with others who may need our help, contact us today.

Diane Maxwell, wife of transplant recipient Mark Maxwell, explains how she helped another family find us: “I met Jude Jamieson through a woman’s retreat, where I learned that she also had a husband with a chronic illness in need of a transplant. I encouraged her to contact HelpHOPELive and start a fundraising campaign since her husband’s transplant hospital required a $5,000 account balance at minimum to list a patient for transplant. They were able to raise the funds through the summer and fall. Her husband went into acute liver failure, but less than a week later, he had a new liver thanks to their fundraising efforts. All I did was be bold enough to suggest she contact HelpHOPELive. You guys did the rest, right on time.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Diane referred Kevin and family to HelpHOPELive for fundraising help


…supporting HelpHOPELive’s mission.


Every donation to our nonprofit helps families across the country receive tangible and compassionate fundraising support. You know firsthand how important that support can be when a medical crisis strikes. Become a monthly contributor to HelpHOPELive today and begin paying it forward to families who need our help to combat the high cost of medical and related care.

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Want to see the true impact of your gift? Keep up with stories of hope on our Blog and on our website, or get a handpicked selection of tips and stories in your inbox every month!


…using your next fundraiser to serve the community.


As Heidi Anderson, mother of 2-year-old transplant recipient Deanna, explains, “Deanna lived in the hospital for more than three months before her transplant. We were visited by many people during that time, including volunteers who would bring her toys and gifts. It truly touched my heart. I see so many children at the hospital now who really need a smile.” Heidi knew a fundraiser in honor of Deanna could provide a way to give back, so she “decided to collect toys for kids at the hospital through a toy drive as part of one of Deanna’s Valentine’s Day HelpHOPELive fundraisers.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The toy collection was a huge success, says Heidi: “So many people brought toys! It made me incredibly happy! We are still collecting today.


…donating in honor of a particular family.


After getting her own fundraising campaign rolling, LAM fighter and transplant candidate Nicole Seefeldt found a way to pay it forward. “I met Alyssa Mebs while I was getting my transplant evaluation,” says Nicole. “We just started talking one night and we became fast friends. Once I saw that Alyssa was fundraising for a transplant, I thought, what can I do to help her? I knew I was going to meet my first fundraising goal…so I donated what I had to give in her honor.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Nicole, left, made a donation to HelpHOPELive in honor of Alyssa

Today, when Nicole asks for donations or donates to a fellow HelpHOPELive client, she keeps this advice in mind: “It’s not the dollar amount you give, it’s that you give at all. Not everybody has a lot of money, but since it’s tax-deductible, every penny is something that they can use that compounds the effect. I never want to put an amount that people have to give. I just encourage them to give what they can.”


You don’t have to have it all to give back.


As Heidi Anderson explains, “Giving back is something we should all consider. Whether you do it with a toy drive or something else, paying it forward is about giving love and kindness to others who need it most.”

Today, consider how you can give back to the community that has given you so much. If you have a great idea for giving back, contact us and we may feature your campaign in an upcoming Blog post!

Your Next Selfie Can Make The World A Better Place

During the holiday season, it’s easy to get caught up in the hype and become fixated on shopping and spending. #GivingTuesday is meant to counteract those rampant indulgences by encouraging all of us to donate to worthy nonprofit causes.


What is an #UNselfie?


An #UNselfie is a picture of you showing how you support worthy causes during the holidays or all year round. An #UNselfie could explain why you support a particular cause, highlight your #GivingTuesday plans or even reveal a random act of kindness that you took part in this year.

Little by little, your #GivingTuesday actions and #UNselfies can help to perpetuate a massive movement that encourages all of us to give just a little bit more during the holiday season.

#UNselfie #GivingTuesday

You can also use your #UNselfie to highlight a HelpHOPELive Campaign that you support in order to gain traction for #GivingTuesday on December 1, when there are no credit card fees on all donations to HelpHOPELive Campaigns.


What does an #UNselfie look like?


Here are a few examples from our staff. Find additional #UNselfies on our Facebook page.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


How can I join the movement?


You can join the #UNselfie movement in three easy steps:

  1. Download and print the #UNselfie template
  2. Write down an act of kindness, a charitable cause or a selfless wish for the holidays
  3. Share on social media with the tags #UNselfie and #GivingTuesday. Add #HelpHOPELive and #GiveHOPE if your #UNselfie involves a HelpHOPELive Campaign!

Visit our website for additional #GivingTuesday tips and suggestions.

Love, Commitment and the Honest Life of a Caregiver

For National Family Caregivers Month this November, we’re profiling individuals who have taken on a caregiver role to support their loved ones. We interviewed Rich Reedy, who has been supporting his wife since a 2014 accident left her with an incomplete spinal cord injury that requires constant care.


Do you consider yourself a caregiver?


I absolutely do consider myself a caregiver. We are fortunate enough in our household to have many people in our circle who we consider caregivers, including a young woman, Judy, who comes in twice a day to support [my wife] Eileen; and Patrick, Bridget and Jacquelyn, our three children, who help out significantly. I serve as a caregiver coordinator, in a manner of speaking: I’m not a boss and not a commander, just a “keeper of the schedule”!

Eileen Reedy HelpHOPELive

Rich Reedy (left) with Eileen Reedy (center) and family.


Is emotional support as important as physical support when you care for someone with an injury?


In my experience, emotional support is a vital part of overall healing. If my wife is not in a good place or if one of our caregivers is unhappy, that attitude is definitely contagious. It’s important to me to try to keep people happy. We want people to support Eileen because their hearts are in it 100%, not because they feel like they NEED to be there. If their hearts are not in it, we do whatever we can to get them there, so that emotional connection is maintained.


What helps you to find relief when you are stressed or upset?

I find my own ways to relieve tension but, in all honesty, when a bad mood starts, it often has to clear on its own. Eileen continues to impress us with her commitment to therapy and progress. Seeing that progress in action is a great motivator and encourager. To me, it’s important to reinforce the good, for my own benefit and for the benefit of other caregivers. I play a role in helping others by reminding them that they are doing a great job and are making an important contribution. Just like in life itself, in caregiving it can make a big difference to be positive and to look for ways to ease the stress and the repetition, so you can continue to take on challenges day after day.


What is the best part of caring for a loved one? The most difficult part?


The best part is loving Eileen and supporting her on her healing journey. Caregiving really can change who you are. I was a man of no patience – now, I am a man of SOME patience, at least! I’ve still got a long way to go.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The worst part is struggling to find time to unwind and clear your mind and finding ways to avoid self-criticism. My day is composed of getting up early and making good use of every spare moment in the day. I run my own business out of my house, so I’m fortunate to be able to work in between assisting Eileen and supporting the rest of the care team. By 6 p.m., I have no brain left! Sometimes I just like to take a few minutes to sit and unwind at the end of a day. I honestly struggle to remember what my life was like before I took on this role!


Which words would you use to describe caring for a loved one?


The two words I’d use to describe caregiving would be love and commitment.


Do you have any advice for other families who are learning about caregiving after injury?


First, I would advise them to lean on professional support. While Eileen was in the hospital, the staff really showed me what my life would look like, even though I didn’t realize at the time that they were preparing me for that reality! I didn’t know that it was going to be a life-changing experience that would last longer than weeks or months. Professional support like that can really help.

Eileen Reedy HelpHOPELive

Eileen with a service dog, Moose.

I’d encourage people who are about to become caregivers to take a look at caregiver resources like books and manuals. Having a guide helped me a lot – I turned to a book called Taking Care of Yourself While Providing Care. The book is written for caregivers who care for people with spinal cord injuries, but its lessons are relevant to any caregiver. Managing self-care is something that professionals and books will always emphasize; it’s as important as ever to take care of yourself when you become a caregiver, if not more important. If you’re not in a good spot, you can’t help anyone else.

My last piece of advice would be to consider accepting outside help. Our twice-per-day caregiver, Judy, has become like a part of our family, but she still has her own life and her own world outside of us. That means we can chat, talk and laugh with her and those interactions don’t overlap with the rest of our family life. It can be a really nice diversion, and that person also comes in with a “clean slate” and not a host of other worries and long-term concerns to bring to the table. She can give Eileen her full concentration, which is helpful for all of us.


We’ll be celebrating caregivers all month. Have a caregiving story to tell? Reach out to us and you could be featured in an upcoming Blog post!

4 Easy Ways To Get Ready For #GivingTuesday

#GivingTuesday is less than two weeks away! On Tuesday, December 1, there will be no credit card fees attached to donations to your HelpHOPELive Campaign. This is your opportunity to rally your community to participate in a universal day of hope and selflessness! Here are a few easy ways to prepare.


1. Understand The Mission


#GivingTuesday

  • …celebrates giving and selflessness
  • …counterbalances Black Friday, Cyber Monday and heavy holiday spending
  • …brings together nonprofits, businesses AND families to give together
  • …is all about “small acts of kindness”

2. Spread The Word On Social


…With These Hashtags:

  • #GivingTuesday: use this whenever you mention the event
  • #UNselfie: use this when you post a selfie that highlights a good cause. Download the template at givingtuesday.org.
  • #GiveHOPE: use this when you post a #GivingTuesday message about HelpHOPELive

…And These Pictures:

Share these pics on social media to help good go viral!

GT2

Size: 470 x 352 (Facebook)

 

Today-Only---Enjoy-No-CC-Fees-(Instagram)

Size: 511 x 511 (Instagram, Facebook or other social sites)

GT3

Size: 511 x 511 (Instagram, Facebook or other social sites)

 

GT4

Size: 511 x 511 (Instagram, Facebook or other social sites)


3. Update Your Outreach


If you plan to contact a news outlet or send an email to friends and family before December 1, make sure you mention #GivingTuesday. It’s a great way to tie your HelpHOPELive Campaign into a major social movement. If you need help figuring out how to explain or incorporate #GivingTuesday, reach out to your Fundraising Coordinator today.


4. Show Your Gratitude


#GivingTuesday is an opportunity to give AND receive. For that reason, it’s a great time to reflect on what your community has already helped you to achieve. Here’s how:

  1. Jot down a few things that you’ve been able to do or accomplish thanks to donations.
  2. Snap a few pictures if you can!
  3. Post an Update about #GivingTuesday that focuses on thanking everyone who has donated so far.
  4. Share your Campaign Page on social media to engage even more friends and family members.

Your friends will be more likely to donate if they can see how they have impacted your life through donations.

HelpHOPELive Campaign Page

Add a #GivingTuesday Update expressing gratitude.


Questions? Have #GivingTuesday ideas to add to our list? Reach out to us on Facebook or on Twitter to connect.

Finding Joy After Injury: 11 Quotes From Dan Gottlieb

Here are 11 powerful quotes from Dr. Dan Gottlieb on love, loss and recovery after a spinal cord injury. Dr. Gottlieb became paralyzed from the chest down in a car accident in 1979. Having survived years of struggle and personal loss, today, Dr. Gottlieb maintains a private psychology practice, lectures and trains health care professionals, and hosts WHYY Philadelphia’s Voices in the Family broadcast.

Dr. Dan Gottlieb, Voices in the Family, NPR, WHYY

All content provided courtesy of the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation via the Foundation-hosted webinar “Dr. Dan on Finding Joy,” August 5, 2015.


On Redefining Joy After Injury:

The definition of joy can change based on an individual’s abilities and circumstances. With a broken neck, I could no longer be the person I thought I should be or the person I would have been or wanted to be. I had no choice but to be the person I am today. When you give up the battle to be someone or something else, you start to look at the world differently. You can lower the bar to what gives you joy; you lower that bar low enough and pure joy is easy to find.

meditation

Take time to appreciate small blessings.

When you’re no longer pursuing an artificial definition of happiness, all of a sudden, the air smells cleaner. At this moment, perhaps you can breathe without coughing. Joy is right there, in that moment.


On Finding Joy By Helping Others:

Joy happens most often when we’re not thinking about ourselves. We are hardwired to help each other. That’s why when someone suffers or is crying, our hearts open. When you want joy and want to feel good, help another feel good, whether that being is a child, an adult, or an animal. The act of expressing care and compassion brings joy. If you don’t feel it, help someone else feel it, and then you will feel it yourself.

caring for child

Caring for others can help you feel joyful again.


On Finding Joy Through Gratitude:

I find joy whenever I: realize that this day is precious; appreciate the fragility of life, knowing deep down that this might be our last day, our last year or our last summer.

sunrise

Viewing life as precious can improve your outlook.


On Accepting Love:

Fear and resentment interfere with our ability to experience love. Let love contribute to the healing in [your] heart. Love is the only vehicle that can help us find peace. On my deathbed, I want to be surrounded with love and be able to love until my last minute. I want to feel that love until my last breath.

afraid girl

Fear can make it difficult for us to accept love.

The most difficult and the most generous part of love comes when someone you love suffers. Be with them. When I find myself in a deep, dark place, I want to be with someone who loves me enough to sit there with me, not a cheerleader to tell me there’s light at the other end. Sit with me in my helplessness and then I will feel your love.


On Overcoming Judgment From Others:

Too many of us see ourselves based on our wheelchairs. We have to see ourselves as complete people. All of us have been [judged] based on the color of our skin, or what we believe, or where we pray, or what we’ve done. Very few people are able to look into our eyes and see our heart and soul. Make a heartfelt commitment to never place that kind of judgment on someone else. When you encounter another, look into their eyes, acknowledge their humanity. That alone will make you feel better.

eyes

When you meet someone, look in their eyes and acknowledge them.


On Discovering Self-Love:

There’s an old Sufi saying: ‘When the heart weeps for what it has lost, the spirit laughs for what it has found.’ Put your hand over your heart and see if you can find kindness, compassion and even love for this [person] whose life has been torn apart.

mirror reflection

Can you find love for the person you see in the mirror?

No one is going to understand your suffering as well as you do. Take a half hour a day to connect with [yourself].


On Pushing Through Pain:

Pain is a demanding companion. You try to look outside, and the pain says, NO – you’re paying attention to ME. If we can sit with that pain and have a heartfelt wish for compassion and kindness for everybody in the world who feels more pain than we do in that moment, it helps us get out of our heads. It changes the story, and that is everything.

ocean gray cloudy gaze

Send out a wish for compassion to combat your pain.


On Humor:

If I were asked to consult on the second edition of the Ten Commandments, one of my commandments would be, ‘Thou shalt not take thyself too seriously.’

laugh

“Thou shalt not take thyself too seriously.”


Want to share your favorite quotes about disability or injury? Share your thoughts with us on Facebook or on Twitter.

HelpHOPELive Clients In The News September 2015

Our clients work hard to engage their communities in fundraising, and the media is taking notice! Here are three standout stories.


Wade Smith: 8-Year-Old Needs Transplant

Wade Smith, Wes Smith, fundraising, Williams Syndrome, illness, chronic illness, catastrophic illness, childhood illness, HelpHOPELive, genetic illness, transplant, transplant fundraising, fundraising for transplant

Wade Smith is an 8-year-old boy in Belington, West Virginia who has experienced more medical emergencies than most of us will ever face. Diagnosed with Williams Syndrome, a genetic condition that causes cardiovascular issues and developmental delays, Wade was born without a right hand. He underwent open heart surgery at 3 months old and was diagnosed with FSGS at age 4. Today he receives daily peritoneal dialysis treatments while he awaits a kidney transplant.

Wade’s story has moved local families and businesses, including the McDonald’s in Philippi, which has agreed to donate 50 cents from every small fry order to HelpHOPELive in Wayne’s honor every Sunday throughout October. (Philippi McDonald’s helping boy with medical expenses)


Sarah Carr: Selfless Mom Seeks Accessible Van

Sarah Carr, Carol Amore, fundraising, fundraising for illness, catastrophic illness, chronic illness, disability, caregiver, awareness, HelpHOPELive

Carol Amore of Beverly, Massachusetts has been the primary caregiver for her daughter, Sarah Carr, for 33 years. Sarah is unable to walk or talk and has been enduring debilitating seizures since she was 5 months old. Now 60, Carol is fundraising for a wheelchair-accessible van that would ease the burden of transporting Sarah to her daily activities and specialty medical appointments.

Carol credits Sarah’s life with teaching her about patience, strength and unyielding compassion. (Beverly family seeks help acquiring handicap van)


August Murphy: 5K Run for Lungs Honors CF Fighter

August Murphy, 5k Run for Lungs, 5k, run, running, marathon, training, marathon training, coach, marathon coach, fitness, health, gym, workout, health, HelpHOPELive, CF, cystic fibrosis

August Murphy will run her first nonstop mile on September 13 at the 5K Run for Lungs event in Portland, Maine. Diagnosed with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis at 4 months, August is fundraising with HelpHOPELive for the double lung transplant she’ll one day need. August’s trainer, Brian Ligotti, plans to run alongside her every step of the way, ready to provide oxygen from a tank if August needs it to finish the race.

August and her medical team hope that fundraising now will limit the amount of additional stress placed on August as she grows stronger in preparation for a transplant. (Maine woman will run for a new set of lungs)


Want your HelpHOPELive Campaign to make headlines? Reach out to your Fundraising Coordinator for assistance with press releases and outreach.

Staff Spotlight: Meet Ashley “Peach” Brown

Ashley Brown, nicknamed Peach, is a HelpHOPELive Financial Assistant and one of the newest members of our team. We found out what makes her tick.

Ashley Brown Peach Brown financial assistant HelpHOPELive staff spotlight


How did you come to work at HelpHOPELive?


I wanted a more meaningful job where I could actually feel like I had helped someone or made a difference at the end of every work day.


What’s your favorite thing about working at HelpHOPELive?


I love seeing updates and photos from our patients through their online Campaign Pages and connecting with patients directly by phone. Hearing patient stories and finding out about successful transplants and other medical milestones really makes you appreciate your life so much more. You’re working for people who don’t have it as easy as you, and they’re working even harder every day just to live and thrive.

I also enjoy speaking with contributors to patient campaigns, because some people are donating their last pennies in the hopes that their contribution will help someone survive.


What gives you HOPE?


Random acts of kindness from strangers give me hope. They let me know that there are people who care in the world and not everybody is in it for themselves. If everybody cared about strangers the way they care about their own family and friends, the world would be a much better place.


Give Peach a shout out on our Facebook page! You can learn more about our team on our website.