Tag Archives: double lung transplant

April is Donate Life Month, and We Are Touched by Transplant

April is National Donate Life Month, a commemoration that we and our patients love to celebrate. This year, Donate Life America, who launched the awareness month in 2003 with its partners, has chosen a special symbol to mark the month: a pinwheel.

Donate Life Month pinwheel 2017

As the organization explains, the imagery is “symbolic of an instrument that turns obstacles into opportunities. Each Donate Life pinwheel has four sails supported by one stem, symbolizing the power one person has to be an organ, eye, tissue or living donor. This April, we encourage you to stop to feel the breeze, watch the pinwheels and think of the lives of those touched by donation and transplantation.”


Since April 2016, 177 Help Hope Live patients have received life-changing transplants. Let’s hear some of their testimonies.

Touched by Transplant 2017 Help Hope Live


“Alive Again” with a Kidney and Liver


Brent Lauffer has fought congenital hepatic fibrosis (an inherited liver disease) since his teenage years. He received a liver/kidney transplant in January 2016.

“The liver is continuing to work and the new kidney is putting out urine!” he wrote in an update on his Help Hope Live campaign page. “As I now live, having received my liver and kidney transplants, I want to thank YOU for your help. You give me HOPE for a bright tomorrow. God bless you for your prayers and support.”

Brent Lauffer Help Hope Live

“You give me HOPE for a bright tomorrow.”

Brent speaks to some of the everyday blessings that came from the transplant, saying “it is amazing to wake up and NOT feel sick, hungry, and have to pee! I am alive and headed towards a real life again. I am so thankful for my friends and family and those whom I’ve never met who are supporting me.”

“I’m pictured here with George. He received the other kidney (from our deceased donor)!“

Brent Lauffer Help Hope Live

Brent with George, who received a kidney from the same donor

Brent fundraises for the Help Hope Live Mid-Atlantic Liver/Kidney Transplant Fund. Fundraising gives his community a way to tangibly support his transplant recovery journey. As one contributor wrote to Help Hope Live, “You are on the side of the angels with the work that you do.”


A Record-Setting Recovery


Living with end-stage renal disease and in need of a pancreas/kidney transplant, Kathe Wimberly Neely has been fundraising with Help Hope Live since 2011. She witnessed countless patients receive the gift of life as she prepared, year after year, for her own miracle. In February 2017, “the call” finally came.

“Two weeks ago, I received the call,” Kathe posted in March. “One week ago, I was discharged from the hospital–a record recovery, according to my medical team. Another record, according to my pharmacist: the fewest discharge meds she had ever seen. My healing has been amazing. Very few side effects–all very manageable. It’s all temporary and I will get through it with a smile.”

Kathe Neely Help Hope Live

Kathe says she is experiencing “a record recovery”

While the gift of life was long-awaited and personally impactful for Kathe, her post-transplant thoughts were with the donor: “That was probably the day a family was facing the greatest heartache one can even imagine. In my eyes, they were so brave to go through such a time while also making some decisions that would forever change my life and the lives of possibly many others with their gift of organ donation. This family, though I do not know who they are, is in my thoughts and prayers daily. This family is who I think of every single night as I fall asleep. I hope to know them one day when they are ready.”

Kathe’s life post-transplant includes a wealth of community support. “Life is grand,” she reported, as “each and every person I know and love brings sunshine to my life. I have met many new people along my journey, each one adding new rays and brightness to my appreciative and over-flowing heart. Again, words escape me.”

Kathe Neely Help Hope Live

Kathe with her custom Donate Life “Pay It Forward” plate

Sometimes the beauty of new life lies in the smallest details, as Kathe’s frequent updates highlight. “Couldn’t sleep, so I came downstairs to sit on the sofa because I can,” she posted. “I’m not tethered to a 15-foot tube that’s attached to a dialysis machine in my bedroom anymore. This is amazing!”

Kathe fundraises for the Help Hope Live South-Atlantic Kidney/Pancreas Transplant Fund. “Love how much you do for others,” she wrote to us. “Much love and thanks for the amazing work you do. I’m so glad to work with my Help Hope Live fundraising team on my transplant journey.”


New Lungs, New Life


Pat Donovan and his family were plagued by uncertainty when he was diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a chronic lung disease where the cause is generally unknown and the only treatment is a double lung transplant. Pat was fortunate to receive a transplant in July 2016 after only 30 days on the transplant waiting list.

Pat Donovan Help Hope Live

Pat received a double lung transplant to fight IPF

“The miracle of Pat’s transplant continues,” reads a recent update on his Help Hope Live campaign page. “Our gratitude is overflowing! April is Donate Life Month and we celebrate Pat, who is doing extremely well, slowly and steadily regaining strength at this stage of his recovery. Walking without [supplementary] oxygen was made possible by an organ donor! Pre-transplant, even simple activities left him gasping for breath and coughing relentlessly.”

Pat Donovan Help Hope Live

“Made possible by an organ donor!”

Along with an incredible improvement in health comes the unfortunate and ongoing burden of transplant-related costs. “There is a need to continue to raise funds for uninsured transplant expenses,” explained an update. “The cost of radical dietary changes to stave off infection and organ rejection are real. Co-pays and deductibles are a concern for all of us. The daily medications he will need for a lifetime are literally a matter of life and death. Travel, lodging, and food for trips from Pat’s home in central Maine to the Boston transplant clinic are not as frequent, but they do come with a cost.

Pat Donovan Help Hope Live

Post-transplant care and medical needs “come with a cost”

Pat fundraises for the Help Hope Live Northeast Lung Transplant Fund.


Fundraise to Sustain the Gift of Life


Touched by Transplant 2017 Help Hope LiveAs Help Hope Live patients have expressed time and time again, a transplant can be an incredible opportunity for greater health and happiness, but it isn’t the end of the road. Fundraising can help to offset some of the lifelong financial burdens of life pre- and post- transplant, including testing, donor search fees, anti-rejection medications and medical travel for routine follow-up care.

Donate Life Month is a great opportunity to start or re-start a transplant fundraising campaign. Help Hope Live was founded in 1983 by a transplant surgeon and his wife, a nurse, who wanted to help more patients have access to transplant procedures. Since our founding, our community-based fundraising campaigns have provided more than $67 million in financial support to cover patients’ unmet transplant related expenses.

Stay tuned for a whole month of memorable Touched by Transplant stories, and keep your pinwheel spinning.

Feeling “Blessed,” Raising Thousands, and Finding Hope: Our Clients in the News

Just a few months into 2017, Help Hope Live clients are getting their stories featured in news outlets across the nation. Here are three standout stories of hope.


Rachelle Ledbetter: Community Responds to Rare Diagnosis with Resounding Strength


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In 1968, Rachelle Ledbetter was the first child to be diagnosed with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), a chronic condition characterized by an exaggerated response of the immune system to the fungus Aspergillus. By adulthood, her hypersensitivity to environmental allergens had developed into a secondary infection that would necessitate a double lung transplant.

Rachelle is the former owner of the Sequoia Sentinel weekly newspaper. Out of respect for her editorial legacy, the Kawaeah Commonwealth, a more recent incarnation of the Sentinel, published in-depth coverage of Rachelle’s medical journey, her “upbeat and positive” outlook, and her plans for a community-driven Help Hope Live fundraiser.

We learned in March that the Spaghetti Feed raised a whopping $8,880 for the Help Hope Live Southwest Lung Transplant Fund in honor of Rachelle. “Apparently, the food ran out after serving 300 meals,” Rachelle wrote in an update on her Help Hope Live campaign page, “and yet you kept coming!” (Rachelle’s Lifetime ‘Journey to New Lungs’)


Michael Thor: Returning Home and Rekindling Hope After a Life-Changing Injury


Michael Thor Help Hope Live

Michael Thor with his wife and caregiver

In November 2015, Michael Thor was hit by a car while riding his motorcycle. He sustained a C2 spinal cord injury. At the time, he was in the process of pursuing one of his lifelong dreams: opening a restaurant with a good friend. The accident put Michael’s restaurant plans and the rest of his passions on hold as he and his family adjusted to his new life with quadriplegia.

After a year and a half of out-of-state intensive therapy, and just a few months after its grand opening, Michael was finally able to return home to see his restaurant in action. Tears filled his eyes as he witnessed how his business partner and staff members had come together to turn their shared vision into reality. “I could not be more proud,” said Michael.

A fundraiser held at Michael’s restaurant kicked off fundraising efforts for the Help Hope Live Southeast Spinal Cord Injury Fund to support ongoing rehabilitation. “I can tell that Mike has been rejuvenated,” wife and caregiver, Sarah, said in an update. “It was a really big morale boost for him to get back home. We were able to raise around $6,000. We truly can’t thank you enough.” (Restaurant Holds Fundraiser for Paralyzed Raleigh Chef)


Kimberly Grossman: Feeling “Blessed” as Faith Community Steps Up to Help


Kimberly Grossman Help Hope Live

Kimberly Grossman with her twins

Though she’s fighting chronic kidney disease, Kimberly Grossman considers herself blessed. Kimberly was diagnosed with end-stage renal disease in her twenties based on symptoms that had been following her around since she was just three months old. Kimberly’s strong connection to a faith-based community in her area provided the starting point for her fundraising campaign.

A spaghetti dinner fundraiser for the Help Hope Live South-Central Kidney Transplant Fund became an emotional lifeline as Kimberly met with friends and neighbors who showed that they cared about her. She and her 5-year-old twins are lifetime church members. “We wanted to do what Jesus tells us to do and help as much as we could,” explained Kimberly’s pastor.

Kimberly “fought back tears” as she reflected on her gratitude for community support. She advised others facing a transplant to “find as many ways as possible to fundraise. There are lots of people wanting to help.” (Spaghetti Dinner Fundraising for Woman in Need of Kidney Transplant)


Want your campaign to get featured in the news, too? Reach out to your Fundraising Coordinator today to receive media outreach support. 

Meet Advocacy Award Honoree Senator Pat Toomey

We present our 2015 Advocacy award to Senator Pat Toomey for organ donor awareness and disability advocacy.

Senator Pat Toomey joined the U.S. Senate in 2011. In May of 2013, he became acquainted with the story of a ten-year-old girl living in Philadelphia who was fighting for her life following a cystic fibrosis diagnosis. Sarah Murnaghan desperately needed a double lung transplant, but according to the Under 12 Rule established by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, Sarah would not be able to join the waiting list for an adult double lung transplant until she turned twelve. Far fewer lungs are available for children under 12 than for adults. As Sarah’s chances of a lifesaving transplant grew slim, her parents launched a desperate online campaign to change transplant regulations to save Sarah’s life.

Senator Pat Toomey with Sarah Murnaghan

Senator Pat Toomey with Sarah Murnaghan

With only weeks left to live without a transplant, Sarah was granted a ten-day period in which she would be placed on the adult transplant list. After those ten days, she would return to the children’s transplant list. As Sarah and her family waited and appealed to their government in a state of desperation, Senator Toomey addressed the U.S. Senate to appeal to Kathleen Sebelius, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, on Sarah’s behalf.

“I rise to speak briefly about a heartrending situation in Pennsylvania,” Toomey said. “There is a brave little ten-year-old girl who is fighting for her life at the Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. At this moment, her government is failing her…The girl is a good candidate, but she’s not on the list.”

Senator Pat Toomey

Senator Toomey addressed the Senate on behalf of Sarah.

Toomey stressed the importance of making a permanent change to the rule, not a one-off exception for Sarah. “What we want is a system that works,” he said. “I think that any child who is a viable candidate for the adult transplant and who has sufficiency urgency ought to be able to go on the adult list. We’re not suggesting that we make an exception for Sarah…stop making exceptions that exclude Sarah. We’re asking for a change in a policy that is flawed.”

Senator Toomey’s appeal on behalf of Sarah worked. The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network not only allowed Sarah to be placed on the adult waiting list, they agreed to allow children under 12 to be given case-by-case exceptions based on their eligibility and health condition.

Sarah Murnaghan

Today, Sarah is breathing on her own thanks to the Senator’s efforts.

Today, after a successful double lung transplant with adult lungs, Sarah is breathing on her own for the first time in years. Senator Toomey took a stand on the Senate floor, and his advocacy saved Sarah’s life and impacted dozens of other families in need.

Senator Toomey’s advocacy initiatives extend to multiple areas that impact HelpHOPELive clients. With Senator Bob Casey, he supported the bipartisan Achieving a Better Life Experience bill, proposed to help families to save funds for their loved ones living with disabilities.

Senator Toomey ABLE Act

Senator Toomey advocates on behalf of people with disabilities and their families.

The Advocacy award will be presented to Senator Toomey at this year’s HelpHOPE-Live It Up! benefit on October16.

HelpHOPE-Live It Up! logo Live It Up! Live It Up 2015 annual event charity galaEach year at HelpHOPELive’s annual signature fundraising event, HelpHOPE-Live It Up!, we honor community heroes who prove why our mission matters with the Help, HOPE and Live awards. In 2015, we’re also giving out an Advocacy and Volunteer of the Year award.

HelpHOPELive Clients In The News September 2015

Our clients work hard to engage their communities in fundraising, and the media is taking notice! Here are three standout stories.


Wade Smith: 8-Year-Old Needs Transplant

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Wade Smith is an 8-year-old boy in Belington, West Virginia who has experienced more medical emergencies than most of us will ever face. Diagnosed with Williams Syndrome, a genetic condition that causes cardiovascular issues and developmental delays, Wade was born without a right hand. He underwent open heart surgery at 3 months old and was diagnosed with FSGS at age 4. Today he receives daily peritoneal dialysis treatments while he awaits a kidney transplant.

Wade’s story has moved local families and businesses, including the McDonald’s in Philippi, which has agreed to donate 50 cents from every small fry order to HelpHOPELive in Wayne’s honor every Sunday throughout October. (Philippi McDonald’s helping boy with medical expenses)


Sarah Carr: Selfless Mom Seeks Accessible Van

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Carol Amore of Beverly, Massachusetts has been the primary caregiver for her daughter, Sarah Carr, for 33 years. Sarah is unable to walk or talk and has been enduring debilitating seizures since she was 5 months old. Now 60, Carol is fundraising for a wheelchair-accessible van that would ease the burden of transporting Sarah to her daily activities and specialty medical appointments.

Carol credits Sarah’s life with teaching her about patience, strength and unyielding compassion. (Beverly family seeks help acquiring handicap van)


August Murphy: 5K Run for Lungs Honors CF Fighter

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August Murphy will run her first nonstop mile on September 13 at the 5K Run for Lungs event in Portland, Maine. Diagnosed with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis at 4 months, August is fundraising with HelpHOPELive for the double lung transplant she’ll one day need. August’s trainer, Brian Ligotti, plans to run alongside her every step of the way, ready to provide oxygen from a tank if August needs it to finish the race.

August and her medical team hope that fundraising now will limit the amount of additional stress placed on August as she grows stronger in preparation for a transplant. (Maine woman will run for a new set of lungs)


Want your HelpHOPELive Campaign to make headlines? Reach out to your Fundraising Coordinator for assistance with press releases and outreach.

These Families Were Touched By Transplant

April is National Donate Life Month.To raise awareness about the importance of organ donation and to celebrate transplant donors, we are sharing stories of HOPE from patients and families touched by transplant. Here are our first three transplant stories.

touched by transplant full

Touched By Transplant: Struggle and Triumph

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This is HelpHOPELive client Derek Avillanoza’s transplant journey.

I found out I would need a transplant in February of 2011. I became very ill. My doctor referred me to a nephrologist who told me the bad news, a conversation which I recall still today: “It’s obvious you will need a kidney. It’s just a question of when.” I was devastated. I started dialysis in June of 2011.

Honestly, I didn’t know that much about kidney transplants before I needed one myself. Then reality hit me. I educated myself, and tried to learn about everything concerning kidney failure. I am still learning and educating other people to this day.

My wife and I felt like we were on top of the world when we first found out we were a donor match through virtual testing. We got very emotional. We found out just days before the procedure that we would not be an appropriate transplant match: my body would reject my wife’s kidney because of higher antibody levels in my system. We were devastated, angry, disappointed and heartbroken. But after signing up for a paired kidney exchange, we experienced another cycle of intense emotions, this time positive, when we got the ‘final’ phone call in January of 2015.

I was absolutely nervous before the operation, because I didn’t personally know many people who had undergone a transplant. The transplant team at UC Davis was outstanding and very informative, letting me know exactly what to expect. I asked a whole bunch of questions!

The recovery process has been very humbling and has required a lot of self-discipline as I control my daily ritual. I have to take prescribed medications at a pre-appointed time twice a day, check my vitals twice a day, manage a strict diet to keep control of my diabetes, and fill out a daily transplant diary to monitor physical changes. I have to chart all of the medications I take (18 in the morning, 15 at night). Oh, and then there’s bloodwork twice a week, and a 6.5-hour drive every Tuesday to visit UC Davis. These steps are worth every minute – they extend my life. I am very thankful.

Friends and family have been very supportive, and I’m very grateful for their kindness and love. Without my wife’s constant urging, I would not even be here talking about my transplant today. I believe that we got married for a reason: she was sent down from heaven to be my angel.

I have had to medically retire from my career in government because of my illness. We were advised by the financial coordinator at UC Davis Transplant Center to pursue a fundraising campaign with HelpHOPELive to cover medical and relocation expenses related to the transplant. We continue to work with HelpHOPELive because we’ve started to receive medical bills associated with the transplant, and we are also incurring expenses related to the medications I need to stay healthy.

I am so blessed and grateful to have gone through this procedure. It has extended my life so that I can spend more time with my wife, children and grandkids.

These are the five words that describe my transplant journey: Grateful. Honored. Humbled. Overwhelmed. Emotional.

 

Touched By Transplant: A Sense of Destiny

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This is HelpHOPELive client David Ludwig’s transplant journey.

I really couldn’t believe it when I found out I needed a double lung transplant. I always thought my cystic fibrosis would have been cured before I reached that point. The whole idea of a transplant seemed far-fetched to me, and I knew very little about transplants prior to having one myself. All I knew was that post-transplant, you live on immunosuppressants for the rest of your life. Unfortunately, I didn’t have much time to learn more about my transplant before it occurred.

I never actually received “the call” telling me I would get a transplant. I had just survived multiple emergency surgeries, including a procedure prompted by my lung rupturing which caused me to bleed out internally. I had a pneumothorax while receiving treatment for a cystic fibrosis-related illness, and I was in critical condition when I was transferred to the Keck USC Medical Center for transplant.

My family was very supportive and so were the friends who found out about my circumstances later. My aunt found HelpHOPELive, and she and my mother used my Campaign Page to fundraise for me while I was incapacitated.

I felt very calm when they offered me the transplant. My life was at stake. I remember giving the resident surgeon a thumbs-up when he asked if I wanted the double lung transplant. I had a strange sense of comfort during the entire process, despite having large extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) tubes and a tracheostomy tube in my neck and additional tubes everywhere. A sense of destiny and the will to overcome seemed to envelop me during this time.

The recovery has been intensive, partially due to post-transplant kidney failure which lasted for six weeks. I was bedridden for several months, so I lost all muscle in my arms and especially in my legs. I had to learn how to walk again. I’m still building up stamina with my new lungs, and that has been the hardest part of the recovery process.

I have new expenses after the transplant to add to the expenses I have had to manage because of my cystic fibrosis. Now, in addition to anti-rejection medications, I take several drugs and numerous vitamins to offset the side effects of the immunosuppressants.

My future is optimistic. Cystic fibrosis is typically a death sentence, a 13- to 30-year time bomb. These new lungs have spared me from my original fate. I am forever grateful to my donor. My donor’s tragic loss has been my gain, and the same is true for many others. The biggest thing I’m looking forward to is playing a round of golf. Now, I will be able to do it without wheezing or breathing through the proverbial straw.

These are the five words that describe my transplant journey: Hope. Gratitude. Rebirth. Renewal. Happiness.

 

Touched By Transplant: Infectious Positivity

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This is HelpHOPELive client Josie Marie Setters’ transplant journey as told by her father, Chase Setters.  

My wacky and energetic 5-year-old daughter, Josie, was taken to a specialist at The Children’s Hospital at OU Medicine in Oklahoma City to evaluate recurring bladder infections. During preliminary checks, it was discovered that Josie’s blood pressure was upwards of 160/90. She was immediately admitted, and two days later, we learned that Josie had chronic kidney disease. Her kidneys were operating at around 30%.

Josie, now 8, remains wacky and energetic despite her diagnosis. Her infectious positivity and silliness have united our community around her. She needs a kidney transplant to survive, and we are hoping to get Josie the transplant she needs in the summer so she can continue to attend school like a normal 8-year-old.

I’m in Information Technology by profession, and I’ve always been a bit of a geek. In early 2015, I posted a Facebook link to Josie’s story and HelpHOPELive campaign. Less than 5 minutes after I posted the link, Wedge, a serial gamer and host of the YouTube channel TheManaSource reached out to me and asked permission to use my story. Next thing I knew, I was tagged in a video that Wedge had created specifically to help my daughter fundraise.

This gesture meant the world to me. Most of us can grasp the idea of selfless giving, but once you witness this miracle in person, it is no longer an idea. It manifests in an incredibly powerful and humbling way, and it becomes almost impossible to express the gratitude you feel towards those who contribute.

We have received donations through HelpHOPELive from contributors across the U.S. One-time strangers who got to know us through Wedge’s video have donated over $1,000 to help Josie. My company of 75 employees pulled together to donate over $10,000, which the company matched.

Is human nature good or evil? Maybe my view has been skewed as I’ve worked to fundraise for my daughter’s lifesaving transplant, but my resounding answer is that our nature is good.

These are the five words that describe my transplant journey so far: Fear. Acceptance. Limitations. Waiting. Hope.

 

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