Tag Archives: faith

Feeling “Blessed,” Raising Thousands, and Finding Hope: Our Clients in the News

Just a few months into 2017, Help Hope Live clients are getting their stories featured in news outlets across the nation. Here are three standout stories of hope.


Rachelle Ledbetter: Community Responds to Rare Diagnosis with Resounding Strength


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In 1968, Rachelle Ledbetter was the first child to be diagnosed with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), a chronic condition characterized by an exaggerated response of the immune system to the fungus Aspergillus. By adulthood, her hypersensitivity to environmental allergens had developed into a secondary infection that would necessitate a double lung transplant.

Rachelle is the former owner of the Sequoia Sentinel weekly newspaper. Out of respect for her editorial legacy, the Kawaeah Commonwealth, a more recent incarnation of the Sentinel, published in-depth coverage of Rachelle’s medical journey, her “upbeat and positive” outlook, and her plans for a community-driven Help Hope Live fundraiser.

We learned in March that the Spaghetti Feed raised a whopping $8,880 for the Help Hope Live Southwest Lung Transplant Fund in honor of Rachelle. “Apparently, the food ran out after serving 300 meals,” Rachelle wrote in an update on her Help Hope Live campaign page, “and yet you kept coming!” (Rachelle’s Lifetime ‘Journey to New Lungs’)


Michael Thor: Returning Home and Rekindling Hope After a Life-Changing Injury


Michael Thor Help Hope Live

Michael Thor with his wife and caregiver

In November 2015, Michael Thor was hit by a car while riding his motorcycle. He sustained a C2 spinal cord injury. At the time, he was in the process of pursuing one of his lifelong dreams: opening a restaurant with a good friend. The accident put Michael’s restaurant plans and the rest of his passions on hold as he and his family adjusted to his new life with quadriplegia.

After a year and a half of out-of-state intensive therapy, and just a few months after its grand opening, Michael was finally able to return home to see his restaurant in action. Tears filled his eyes as he witnessed how his business partner and staff members had come together to turn their shared vision into reality. “I could not be more proud,” said Michael.

A fundraiser held at Michael’s restaurant kicked off fundraising efforts for the Help Hope Live Southeast Spinal Cord Injury Fund to support ongoing rehabilitation. “I can tell that Mike has been rejuvenated,” wife and caregiver, Sarah, said in an update. “It was a really big morale boost for him to get back home. We were able to raise around $6,000. We truly can’t thank you enough.” (Restaurant Holds Fundraiser for Paralyzed Raleigh Chef)


Kimberly Grossman: Feeling “Blessed” as Faith Community Steps Up to Help


Kimberly Grossman Help Hope Live

Kimberly Grossman with her twins

Though she’s fighting chronic kidney disease, Kimberly Grossman considers herself blessed. Kimberly was diagnosed with end-stage renal disease in her twenties based on symptoms that had been following her around since she was just three months old. Kimberly’s strong connection to a faith-based community in her area provided the starting point for her fundraising campaign.

A spaghetti dinner fundraiser for the Help Hope Live South-Central Kidney Transplant Fund became an emotional lifeline as Kimberly met with friends and neighbors who showed that they cared about her. She and her 5-year-old twins are lifetime church members. “We wanted to do what Jesus tells us to do and help as much as we could,” explained Kimberly’s pastor.

Kimberly “fought back tears” as she reflected on her gratitude for community support. She advised others facing a transplant to “find as many ways as possible to fundraise. There are lots of people wanting to help.” (Spaghetti Dinner Fundraising for Woman in Need of Kidney Transplant)


Want your campaign to get featured in the news, too? Reach out to your Fundraising Coordinator today to receive media outreach support. 

Transplant Caregiving “Is Not My Calling, But It Is What I Do”

In October 2013, Douglas Petrie complained to his doctor about shortness of breath. A lung specialist diagnosed him with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). By September of the following year, a lung infection had propelled Doug onto the lung transplant waiting list. This is Doug’s transplant story, as told by his wife and caregiver Carol Petrie.


Doug got his transplant August 16, 2015. As I drove home at 2 a.m. after the operation and seeing Doug in the ICU, I thought, “Doug has been born again. He has a new life. He can breathe.” This is the first time I have written about our adventure.

Douglas Petrie HelpHOPELive

Doug, left, was “born again” after transplant, says wife Carol

I have likened our transplant experience to a pregnancy. We were on call, with a bag packed, and Doug was on the list for nine months. Wherever we went, we had to travel with Doug’s supplies just in case.

When Doug was first diagnosed, he was told, “Don’t worry–you have the slow-moving kind of IPF.” What we didn’t know was that even a cold could cause his health to deteriorate quickly. We had to learn that everything was a “big deal.” Even though I had done a little research on the Internet, I did not know which questions to ask. We are very grateful for the medical professionals who helped us because we were out of our depth.

We could see Doug’s health go downhill. We kept liquid oxygen in the house for him to use. When he had a doctor’s appointment, we always had to make sure we packed enough oxygen. Going anywhere became a production. We learned to adapt and manage Doug’s time so we wouldn’t miss any big occasions.

Douglas Petrie HelpHOPELive

Carol “could see Doug’s health go downhill” pre-transplant

Doug got a bill from the hospital for $572,000 about four months after the transplant. I was told the whole package would be about $1 million. There are constant doctor visits to pay for. While Doug took two medications prior to his IPF diagnosis, after transplant and for the rest of his life, he’ll be taking over 15 pills per day. He can’t even skip one day; these pills keep him alive.

Doug’s insurance helps to reimburse us for mileage, tolls, some meals and some lodging up to a year after transplant. We have not been able to qualify for help from Medicaid like some organ transplants do.

HelpHOPELive has been a big help to us. The bills from the pharmacy go straight to HelpHOPELive for payment so we don’t have to cover the cost up front. The staff at HelpHOPELive is helpful and knowledgeable and has advised me on which fundraising ideas work better than others.

Douglas Petrie HelpHOPELive

Carol added Doug’s HelpHOPELive page to her email signature to reach new contributors

A doctor friend of ours sent out letters to his colleagues informing them of Doug’s condition and asking for donations, and they raised more money than any one big fundraiser would have. I’m working on an idea for a large annual event that would pay for Doug’s medicines for a year.

Doug says he had to learn to breathe again after the transplant. With a few precautions, he should be able to do almost anything. It’s been a year since his lung transplant and we are forever grateful to the donor and family, and to all of the folks at Tampa General Hospital and HelpHOPELive.

Douglas Petrie HelpHOPELive

Doug “should be able to do almost anything” post-transplant

This has been my third time serving as a caregiver. I took care of my parents before they died. I have never been interested in medicine or taking care of the ill, so taking care of someone this time around is surreal. This is not my calling, but it is what I do for a loved one.

There are decisions I had to make for the family when I first took on this role. I had to tell Doug he had to stop driving until after the transplant. I had to make sure I had all the contact numbers for doctors and the hospital. It was my job to tell the doctors how Doug was progressing. I had to make sure Doug did not do too much. It was frustrating for him when he would become tired and he would not be able to do little things like carry dishes from the table to the kitchen. I had to learn [to identify] when he reached this level and help him calm down.

You need others to help when you are a caregiver. Our son, Chase, and a young family friend helped out. It is good to have someone on call who can drive for you. After transplant, Doug had to see the doctor once a week for 8 weeks. The doctor was an hour away and the drive became tiresome for us.

Douglas Petrie HelpHOPELive

“You need others to help when you are a caregiver.”

Since the transplant, I’m more of a manager and I’m less hands-on. Doug takes his own vital statistics daily, checks his lung capacity and logs the information to take to monthly clinic visits. I just make sure it gets done.

We have tried through this journey to keep our sense of humor and that has been a big help. We have also had a strong prayer support system. I have tried to carve out time for myself away from the house, whether it’s a movie, lunch with a friend or a haircut.

Doug and I have a deep faith and that has kept us grounded. I look at Isaiah 43:1-3, a passage that includes two of my favorite words from scripture: “fear not.” I claimed this scripture for our family and have gone back to it time after time, praying it back to God.

Our neighbors and friends have helped with contributions and checking in on me and our son. I have a group email list for family, friends and contributors and I have a group text for family to keep everyone up to date. Between that, posting on Facebook and calling our church, I can have several hundred people praying for Doug in a very short period of time. This has been a source of hope and assurance for us.

I would advise other transplant families to keep their sense of humor and laugh lots. Doug recommends to other transplant families that they should do everything medical professionals tell them to do, no more and no less.

Don’t try to do more because you’ll tire yourself out. Be sure the doctors order home health support for you including a physical therapist. Don’t be afraid of filling up your pill box. Don’t be afraid of calling your post-transplant coordinator with questions. Don’t be worried about raising money – HelpHOPELive will help you.


Learn more about life after transplant by checking in with Doug and his family at helphopelive.org. Want to learn more about transplant preparations, costs and fundraising options? Find more transplant stories like this one.  

Voices Of Hope: “No Matter What Happens, We Always Love Each Other”

Yusef Harris is a loving father and a longtime community volunteer and youth mentor. Combating health issues since 2004, Yusef needs a kidney transplant to live a long and healthy life. He and his family have turned to HelpHOPELive for fundraising support.

Yusef Harris HelpHOPELive

Yusef is fundraising or a kidney transplant with support from his family

As he copes with the challenges of end-stage renal failure and exhausting dialysis treatments, Yusef draws inspiration from his family to stay positive and keep fighting. We asked daughters NaQari and Miyala about fundraising and sticking together as a family in the face of challenging circumstances.


How is your family helping Yusef to manage fundraising?


Miyala: We help sell shirts and do our best to promote his HelpHOPELive campaign and let others know about it. We have all purchased and worn his #LemonadeLife clothing as well! We started the #LemonadeLife hashtag with our father because, as our dad puts it, “I refuse to let kidney failure end what I know to be a meaningful life.”

NaQari: We also go out with him and educate people about kidney failure and being organ donors using HelpHOPELive brochures and bracelets.

Yusef Harris HelpHOPELive

“When life gives you lemons…”


What are you currently fundraising for to help Yusef?


NaQari: We are currently fundraising to help cover the bills that come with the kidney transplant surgery and the medications he will need to live with a new kidney.


When did you first realize how expensive a transplant could be for your family?


Miyala: When we took time to talk about the transplant process and what we would all have to go through, we learned about the financial commitment.

NaQari: I realized the financial commitment the moment my father began to take precautions and go through all the necessary steps required for him to be a candidate for the transplant surgery. I learned about the cost mostly from my father, and I also learned through research on the Internet and heard about the financial component from people who had received a transplant who posted about it on Facebook. I was told that the anti-rejection medications would be between $200 and $300 per month for the rest of his life.

Yusef Harris HelpHOPELive

Yusef will take on the financial burden of transplant with help from family and friends


Is your community supportive of what your family is going through?


Miyala: Everyone is there for us if we ever need anything. We have people we can count on.

NaQari: Our church family and Facebook community is very supportive. They understand that my father is going through tough circumstances and they do everything they can to help, whether that is donating or sharing my father’s story.

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How do you feel about fundraising with HelpHOPELive?


Miyala: It’s been great. My dad talked to me about working with HelpHOPELive and what is being done to help us is wonderful.

NaQari: I love fundraising with HelpHOPELive! They provide a professional-looking site and help with the work necessary for my father to raise funds.

Yusef Harris HelpHOPELive

NaQari appreciates that HelpHOPELive provides “help with the work necessary for my father to raise funds”


Do you think it can be difficult to stay positive while on the transplant waiting list?


Miyala: I know for a fact it’s difficult. Having to wait is hard. Your whole life depends upon what happens at that point. I just say to him and anyone else, never give up. God has a plan for you.

NaQari: It can be very difficult staying positive while on the waiting list because so much can happen. You can get an at-risk donor or someone who doesn’t match your blood type, and that makes you think more about the possible complications that come with the surgery. My advice is to pray and keep a positive spirit, because if you think positive you will have positive results.


Is it challenging to watch your father cope with a chronic health condition?


Miyala: I know that things are hard but at the same time, you never know exactly what that person is going through or feeling. You want to understand, but sometimes that’s hard. It hurts to see the pain that they go through.

NaQari: My dad had to quit working because of his health. He couldn’t work for long before he experienced pain. My dad has had small bouts of depression and he tries his best to be positive. It affects all of us because we are all so used to seeing that spark in his eye. It is difficult to watch my father cope with his health condition because I can’t experience it or take away the pain that comes with it, nor can I take away all the risks and what-ifs.


What’s the best part about being a member of your family?


Miyala: No matter what we’re going through, we’ve been taught to stick together, and that’s what we do. I always know that my dad and everyone else in my family is there for me.

NaQari: No matter what happens, we always love each other and have fun together.


Tell us a little bit about your dad’s role as a youth mentor in the community.


NaQari: My dad has mentored and become a father figure for many young men in our church community and he has helped them with everything from homework to life lessons. He loves mentoring young people because he wants to help them become wonderful men and keep them from being another statistic in their neighborhoods.

Yusef Harris HelpHOPELive

Yusef’s community is grateful for his work in youth mentoring

It became a part of his life when these individuals were born and came to our church. On a day-to-day basis, he is doing everything he can to better himself. Then he calls or messages the individuals or their guardians or parents to check up on them to see how things are going and if he can help them in any way.


When it comes to your dad’s life, from living gracefully with a chronic condition to volunteering and mentoring at-risk youth, what are you most proud of?


Miyala: I love that my dad took his story and made it into something so positive. He wants everyone to know that life will give you lemons, but all you have to do is make lemonade. It’s never over. I just want my father to know that I am very proud of what he’s done. He has helped mold me into the young lady that I am, and I love him for that.

NaQari: Even when he doesn’t feel good, he finds a way not only to be my father but a father for other children who don’t have one. To me, that is the most selfless thing I can think of, because he provides for those children as well as us.  My dad has found a way to love his wife and two daughters unconditionally while giving the same love to many other kids at the drop of a hat. He takes care of them just like he would take care of us. I love that about my dad.

Yusef Harris HelpHOPELive

Yusef’s family and community are behind him on his transplant journey


To learn more about Yusef, NaQari and Miyala, visit helphopelive.org.  Want to help support transplant families? Make a donation to HelpHOPELive and find out what else you can do to raise awareness and support families facing a medical crisis.  

Life On The Heart Transplant Waiting List

Patrick McEntee was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy in 1996. By 2008, he had experienced two strokes and a non-obstructive heart attack. He received an LVAD in 2014 and began fundraising with HelpHOPELive six months after being listed for transplant. In honor of Heart Month, here are Patrick’s observations after a year and a half on the transplant waiting list.

pat1

Pat received an LVAD in 2014


The Physical Impact


I was evaluated for transplant at the Cleveland Clinic in August 2014 and again in September 2014. I was admitted to the hospital immediately upon completion of that second evaluation and was officially listed for transplant that month. My LVAD was put in two days later. It was strange because I had walked – struggling to do so, but still walking on my own – to appointments all over the Clinic’s campus that Friday, and doctors thought I would be listed as a low-priority Level 2 on the waiting list. By Monday, they wouldn’t allow me to get out of bed. I didn’t feel any different, but I went with what they told me. Things escalated very quickly.

The LVAD knocked me for a loop. I didn’t quite know what I was in for. I was sedated for three days after the procedure and I spent a few more days in the ICU. I was in the hospital for a month total. I knew I was going for transplant evaluations, but I really had no idea that I would be there for a month. I thought I’d be returning home the same day. I got the LVAD and it was clear I wasn’t going to be able to continue working and living. I had to apply for disability and prepare for transplant.


Financial Challenges


When you go for a heart transplant evaluation, you don’t just see a transplant coordinator. You also see a cardiologist, a bone doctor, a dentist, a dermatologist and more–and there are expenses associated with each. It’s $30 every time I walk up to a doctor’s desk, plus parking and travel: it’s a 3.5-hour drive to Cleveland and 3.5 hours back home every time I have an appointment. I’m there at least once a month, and I’ve been admitted to the hospital twice during regular appointments since the LVAD was put in to help prepare my body for transplant.

Pat makes a 3.5-hour drive to his transplant center.

Pat faces a 3.5-hour drive to his transplant center


The Role of Fundraising


I’m honestly overwhelmed at the support I’ve been receiving. I’ve had family members, friends, and even friends-of-friends and anonymous donors make significant donations. Most of my fundraising has happened through online sharing and word-of-mouth. The most unnerving thing financially is not really knowing what medications I’ll be on and how much they will cost. Thanks to fundraising, even if I’m looking at $1,000 per month out-of-pocket with prescriptions, I have enough built up that I would be able to cover it for quite a while.


Finding Gratitude


The realization that there are certain things I can’t do is a challenge. Seventy- and 80-year-olds say that, but here I am at 41 saying that myself. But overall, I’m very thankful for the situation that I’m in. I’d love to be completely healthy, obviously, but it is what it is. I’m happy to be able to come and go and do what I want and still have a decent level of independence at this stage.

My wife has been tremendous. She has helped me take it day by day and roll with the changes. She has to be careful now about scheduling her travel for work in case I get ‘the call’ or need her help. It’s a toll that she’s happy to deal with, but it does get in the way of her being able to do what she wants or needs to do at times. For me it’s about staying positive, because I’m surrounded by my wife, my family, my friends and even strangers who are willing to jump in and help out. If you’re a positive person, I think people around you will often respond in that way.

I am grateful for the prayers from thousands of people from all over the country – many people, including strangers, have told me they pray for me daily. It’s truly humbling. My faith has taught me to be grateful for the extra time I have been given in this life, no matter how much more I get. I could easily be dead by now, but I am alive, which I take to mean that God has more for me to learn and accomplish in this life.


Unexpected Benefits


My sister has had similar heart-related issues within the past year. One of the benefits of not being able to work was being able to look out for her and take her to appointments. Beyond that, I’ve started to volunteer with some of the medical centers, talking to patients who are considering an LVAD or have just received one. I explain my experience to them. I’ve really appreciated being able to do that. I see it as almost a ministry, talking to these patients to give them my take on it.


Getting (Too) Comfortable


It’s one thing to say, okay, I’m used to this and this is the new normal. But I have to keep reminding myself that I could get the call at any time. There was a time after the LVAD that I didn’t feel like I was ready to get the call. Today, I still try to imagine what I’ll be doing when I get the call and how I’ll react. Am I going to be able to drop everything and go? If I got the call right now, I’d have to grab a bag and be out the door and tell my wife to meet me up there. It’s a fine line: I want to continue with life and not end up sitting there doing nothing, just waiting.

pat3

Pat describes the “fine line” between preparing for transplant and continuing to live life


The Role Of Humor


Some might see my wife and my sense of humor as a bit morbid, but I find that laughing about our situation is helpful. For Christmas, my wife gave me an anatomically-correct plush heart and said, “Until the real thing comes along.” She also gave me a pair of socks with gold hearts and “heart of gold” stitched on them. Friends on Facebook helped me create a cardioversion playlist with songs like “Electric Avenue,” “Kickstart My Heart,” and “We Got The Beat.” A sense of humor is mandatory in dealing with the unknown of the process of waiting for a transplant.

"Until the real thing comes along..."

“Until the real thing comes along…”


What To Do While You’re Waiting


The important thing is to keep living your life and doing as much as you can. While I’m not working, I wake up and ask, what is my purpose today? Some days my purpose is to sit on the couch and watch TV. But other days I’ll say, today I’m going to do some writing. Today I’m going to read a book. Today I’m going to the grocery store. Whatever it is that you’re able to do, do it.

Get involved in whatever ways you can in life. For example, through volunteering. I found that very rewarding and helpful. Be willing to give of yourself. A lot of people would agree with me that when you give, you receive. It’s nice to tell your story and hear the stories of others.

Lastly, I would add, stay active. It’s not unusual to gain weight with the LVAD, so exercising as much as possible is incredibly important. I know it’s difficult when you are in heart failure but it’s a way to ensure you can be as strong as possible when the call comes.


Follow Patrick’s story or make a donation in his honor on his HelpHOPELive Campaign Page. Have your own transplant story to tell? Reach out to us on Facebook.

Voices Of Hope: I Donated A Kidney To My Best Friend

Author and professional rock musician James Michael McLester was diagnosed with end-stage renal disease in his early thirties. He endured 13 years of regular hemodialysis before his best friend, Laura Suarez McCutcheon, offered to donate one of her kidneys to James to save his life. On December 9, James received the gift of life from Laura.

James Michael McLester living donor HelpHOPELive

Laura donated a kidney to her best friend, James


How did you find out that Laura was a compatible donor?


James: Laura and I were like brother and sister when we were involved in the same music scene in the ‘80s. We lost touch for twenty seven years. In June 2014, Laura sent me a message on Facebook asking about my life. I shared with Laura my new autobiography and a bit of my medical history. At the time, I was dependent on dialysis and I was coping with shortness of breath, fatigue, anxiety, hypertension and severe fluid restrictions. Laura volunteered and was tested as a living kidney donor for me at the Texas Transplant Institute in San Antonio, and she was a match.

Laura: I really didn’t think too much about it when I made the decision to get tested. I just wanted to help him. During the months that followed, I never gave it a second thought. By nature, I am a worrier, and I’d never had surgery before, but I knew this was the path God chose for me. I never had one second of apprehension.


What would your future have looked like without Laura’s gift?


James: As a professional musician, I was unable to tour overseas in several countries where dialysis is either unavailable or reserved for extremely wealthy citizens. I would have faced twenty to thirty years of dialysis three times every week. I would have had to endure continued stress and anxiety and an income decreased by 80 percent due to my dialysis schedule.

James Michael McLester HelpHOPELive

James would have faced ongoing health struggles without a donor


How did you feel knowing that she was willing to give the gift of life to you?


James: Before Laura, five different kidney donors were tested for me between 2007 and 2015, and each was unable to donate either because of medical reasons (blood type, health issues) or personal circumstances. After I enjoyed dinner and a long talk with Laura and her fiancé, Chris, we both started to feel comfortable proceeding with the kidney transplant work-up to determine her eligibility to donate. Laura exemplified unconditional love towards me. She is a giving friend to all who know her.

Laura: Once we found out I was a match, we were so excited, I think James was in shock!


Do you two share a special connection now?


James: Laura and I both love the Lord with all of our hearts and realize that He is our source for giving thanks, walking in grace and mercy, and eternally growing in compassion. Everywhere we now travel in this life, we will illustrate a divine portrait of giving and receiving.

Laura: He is my best friend, brother and confidant. Our bond is unbreakable! Our relationship is one of true, honest love and respect.


What is the most exciting part of life after transplant?


Laura: James is very happy post-transplant! He’s making plans and looking forward to his future and the possibilities it holds. I love to see him smile!

James: I can now look forward to touring with my various musical projects, traveling, starting a family, and continuing to share my story for God’s glory.

James Michael McLester HelpHOPELive

James looks forward to touring with several bands post-transplant


Do you still have medical expenses to cover with fundraising?


James: I am responsible for a Medicare supplement policy with an out-of-pocket cost of $385 per month. Thirty-six months after my transplant date, Medicare will terminate my coverage and I will be fully responsible for all transplant-related medical expenses for the rest of my life. The expensive anti-rejection medications I have to take for my lifetime are out-of-pocket expenses that will cost me hundreds or thousands every month. With that said, there’s no guarantee that I will be able to push myself to return to full time work for another few months now that the transplant has happened, so my income is still not what it was before I switched to part time work. That’s why I continue to fundraise with HelpHOPELive even after the transplant.


Laura, would you recommend living donation to someone else?


Laura: I recommend organ donation to everyone. It’s an important decision, and one that must be understood and offered from a place of pure love. It’s an amazing experience! It wasn’t until after our surgery that I really realized, I saved James’ life. Wow! What a gift God has given me! If I had to do it over, I would. Give life! There is no greater gift.

James Michael McLester HelpHOPELive

Laura and the rest of James’ community came together in support


Follow James’s recovery story at helphopelive.org.

4 Ways To Engage Your Faith Community For Fundraising

In honor of National Donor Sabbath this week, here are a few ideas for how to engage your faith community in fundraising.


Spread Awareness With National Donor Sabbath

Between November 13 and November 15, faith communities across the country will celebrate National Donor Sabbath, a time to honor individuals who have saved lives through organ donation. It’s an opportunity for discussion and education: as Donate Life California notes, “ALL major religions support organ, eye and tissue donation, and believe it to be a final act of kindness and generosity.”

National Donor Sabbath 2015

Source: donatelife.net

HelpHOPELive will be distributing free organ donor awareness materials to congregants at St. David’s Episcopal Church in our local Wayne, PA community this year. Consider asking your faith community to honor the occasion in 2016. Contact your HelpHOPELive Fundraising Coordinator to request awareness materials to help spread the word.


Showcase Ways To Make A Difference

Your place of worship may be an ideal location to bring people together to sign up to be bone marrow donors, blood donors or registered organ donors. These drives can raise awareness for a cause, inspire attendees to donate to your HelpHOPELive Campaign and create an opportunity to enlist community volunteers who may help you to promote your Campaign or plan future fundraising events.

bone marrow drive swab

Hold a bone marrow drive to raise awareness and support for your Campaign.

In 2010, HelpHOPELive client Vinodkumar Challagundla desperately needed a bone marrow transplant to fight myelofibrosis. His faith community came together to hold bone marrow drives across the country at which potential donors could submit their cheek swabs for compatibility testing. The community found overwhelming support for the initiatives: more than 15,000 people joined the National Marrow Donor Program registry through the drives, including the donor that would save his life.


Hold A Fundraiser

A place of worship can be a great venue for a fundraising event, from a post-service pancake breakfast to a community yard sale. If you are already involved with a faith community, contact your HelpHOPELive Fundraising Coordinator for event ideas that will suit the venue and audience.

pancake breakfast

Your place of worship could be a great location for a fundraising event.

If your faith community has a suitable concert area or holds a regular musical event, consider engaging faith leaders to help you plan a concert to fundraise for your Campaign. A faith-based community concert in honor of HelpHOPELive client Allen West Edgar attracted over 300 attendees and raised significant proceeds towards Allen’s kidney transplant. Allen even performed at the concert, showing attendees how much their support meant to him.


Engage A Volunteer Network

Some faith communities have a social service and outreach component built into their mission or their youth organizations. See if your place of worship would be willing to help you reach out to individuals who want to support your fundraising efforts in the name of their faith. HelpHOPELive client Ethan Kadish’s friends and family members engaged their faith community to support Ethan through two projects, a 5K event and a performance by a local youth band, that tied into service expectations for a coming-of-age religious ceremony.

friends

Find enthusiastic volunteers through your faith community.


Want more fundraising tips and ideas? Reach out to your HelpHOPELive Fundraising Coordinator for support and browse our Blog for additional insights.