Tag Archives: fundraising help

How You Can Step Up To Support A Family Facing A Medial Crisis

Donating to HelpHOPELive isn’t the only way to support a family facing the financial and emotional burdens associated with a transplant. Just ask Danielle Bailey, who has helped three HelpHOPELive clients plan bingo and poker fundraisers using her event planning experience. Learn why Danielle pours her time, energy and expertise into helping these families, and you’ll be inspired to do the same!

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle, left, supports multiple HelpHOPELive families


How did you get involved in fundraising?


My first event was to help fundraise for a little girl with a double cochlear implant who was having trouble securing state funds to attend a school for children with hearing loss. I helped to plan a bingo event, since everyone has fun playing bingo and it’s a great way to raise money and have fun. We were able to raise $400 for her.

Since then, I have been involved with events raising funds for several causes, including autism awareness, cancer awareness, canine companions, and kids’ medical needs. As an AVON representative, in addition to helping plan fundraisers, I typically reserve a table at each fundraising event to show support and advertise my services and I donate raffle prizes.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle has engaged in fundraising for several nonprofit causes


How are you connected to the HelpHOPELive families you help?


[Former HelpHOPELive client] Mary Jo Lovely is my mother. She made the decision to donate my stepfather (Stephen Boyes)’ organs in 1998 when he suddenly passed away. She was diagnosed with COPD and was put on 24/7 oxygen at 42. She was put on the transplant waiting list and she received her first single lung transplant in July 2007. A year and a half later, swine flu hit our family and the disease immediately put my mother’s body into a state of rejection. She received her second lung transplant in June 2015.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle’s mother “received her second lung transplant in June 2015”

I met [HelpHOPELive client] Karlene Novotny in 1998 when she did my taxes. We clicked right away. She opened her own business which I followed for a few years before she became sick. I saw her name in a news article shared on Facebook and we got back in contact. I was shocked to learn how sick she was and how much she had gone through since we lost contact.

I first met Natalie Meyers in person on March 12, 2016 while I was hosting the bingo fundraiser in honor of Karlene. She had just started fundraising with HelpHOPELive a few days before the event. A co-worker shared her story with me and I reached out to her, contacted the local fire company and started the planning process to help her with a fundraising event. I invited her to the bingo fundraiser in honor of Karlene so that she could see how events were managed to better prepare herself for the event in her honor later this year.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Flyer designed by HelpHOPELive for the upcoming event


What’s the hardest part about planning a fundraiser?


I give myself a good six months to plan everything to limit hurdles along the way. I send donation requests to local businesses, find vendors to set up at the event, make sure there is advertising via social media and flyers in local groceries stories where permitted, and so much more. The hardest part is waiting for the event to happen!

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

This year, Danielle is expanding her wheelhouse to include poker events


What is the most satisfying part of planning a fundraiser?


There is so much that is fulfilling about fundraising. Being able to help someone in need gives you such an amazing feeling. The most satisfying part is seeing a room full of 200 people pulling together to help a single person. Seeing local businesses helping the community also makes you proud to be a part of it.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle loves ” seeing a room full of…people pulling together to help”

Knowing I helped make it all happen for a great cause gives me such a sense of accomplishment! I love helping where I am needed. The actual amount raised may not be like winning the lottery, but for these families, it’s close because of the tremendous impact. Every little bit counts.


Do you help because you expect these families to pay you back in the future?


No way. I do not expect anything from anyone that I help. I just do it to get the feeling of being able to help, and that is enough for me.


Can fundraising be both emotionally and financially significant?


After my mom had her first transplant, I realized how much everything related to the transplant was going to cost. When your family is stressing out about how they are going to pay for the transplant and the medications that will keep them alive, it can honestly tear them apart. That stress can affect the entire family and fundraising can make a difference.

I have referred people to HelpHOPELive for years. I love that the funds raised go directly to the individual’s medical needs and not into some CEO’s pocket!


What does the word HOPE mean to you?


HOPE is life! Every day we take advantage of the things we’re given. We were all dealt a certain hand in life; it is who we are and what will make us stronger. Help those who are less fortune, because someday you may be the one who needs help.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

“Someday you may be the one who needs help,” said Danielle


Like Danielle, you can make a difference for a family facing a medical crisis. Start a fundraising campaign with our nonprofit today at helphopelive.org. Learn how to help an existing HelpHOPELive family by calling 800.642.8399.

Nick’s Fight Against Aplastic Anemia

Nick Karavite was diagnosed with a rare blood disease called aplastic anemia at age 13. His bone marrow stopped producing enough vital blood cell varieties which caused his immune system to attack itself. Nick’s treatment included extended hospital stays and testing, chemotherapy and, finally, a bone marrow transplant from his 6-year-old sister, Mandy, exactly one year ago today. We spoke to Nick and his mother, Pam, about his transplant journey.

Mandy Karavite chemotherapy Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

Nick encourages everyone to sign up as a bone marrow donor.


Walk us through the first few days.


Pam: To be honest, everything happened so fast that none of us had much time to process it. One day Nick was pitching a no-hitter, and the next day he had red spots all over him, a fever and exhaustion. I took him to the pediatrician and they did blood work and immediately sent us to the hospital. We were met by an entourage of doctors and nurses and escorted right to another room – no E.R., no waiting room. By the next morning, a bone marrow biopsy was performed and he was diagnosed with aplastic anemia.

We went from a routine visit to the pediatrician on Monday to hearing that our son could die on Wednesday. There just wasn’t any time to think, just react.


How much did you know about aplastic anemia when you were first diagnosed?


Nick: I didn’t know anything about aplastic anemia, and I had never heard of the disease before. In fact, nobody in my family had any experience with the disease. Even though I knew nothing at the beginning, I could probably tell you everything about the whole process at this point!

HelpHOPELive: Aplastic anemia is a rare disorder that causes an individual’s immune system to attack and destroy the body’s bone marrow. Fewer than 1,000 cases are diagnosed annually in the U.S. It is uncertain what causes aplastic anemia to occur.

hospital Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

Post-diagnosis, Nick spent extensive amounts of time in the hospital.


Was your family worried about you?


Nick: Yes, my family members were very worried. My mom would think about it every single night as she watched me sleep – she wanted to change places with me. But they didn’t let that worry get in the way. The same goes for my friends. Instead of overloading me with questions about it, they just cared for me.

Pam: We had our moments (I call them 80/20 days). Nick’s doctor told us that even with his sister, Mandy, as a bone marrow match, his chance of survival was 80%. I had days where I couldn’t shake the 20%. Once, I was packing a bag in Nick’s closet before heading back to the hospital and I had a vision of packing up his closet for good. I fell apart, began sobbing, sniffing his clothes, falling to my knees and begging God to leave my son here. I started calling them ‘closet moments’ – if I ever needed to cry, I would go find a closet so that Nick never knew.

Make A Wish Pamela Karavite Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

One year ago today, Nick gives his mother a Make A Wish medal.


Were you scared?


Nick: I wasn’t too scared, because I honestly didn’t know what was going to happen. I was learning more about the condition and focusing on what needed to happen next. I guess there is mild, moderate and severe aplastic anemia. I had severe aplastic anemia, but my parents never shared that or my survival odds with me until after I made it through.


What helped your family remain positive?


Pam: We were united in our common love for Nick, but I feel we remained positive because of God’s hand in things. I spent a lot of nights watching Nick sleep, wondering why this was happening. I still am not clear as to the “why,” but I am sure that God had a hand in preparing us for this battle for three reasons.

First, five years ago, God blessed us with the surprise of Mandy, who ended up being Nick’s ideal bone marrow match. Second, I had started work on my Masters in Special Education before Nick’s diagnosis, which equipped me perfectly to home school Nick for three quarters of his 8th grade year while he pursued treatment. Third, we moved our children to a different school district prior to his diagnosis, and the support of this new community became a true lifeline for our family when Nick was diagnosed.

hospital bed Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

The Karavite family sought to stay positive
throughout treatment.

The community really rallied to keep us lifted. Local parents put us in touch with HelpHOPELive, helped us cook meals and clean and held fundraisers in Nick’s honor. His peers at school even donated their allowance to his campaign. Teachers went above and beyond for Nick – his basketball coach gave him an honorary spot on the team even though he wouldn’t be able to play. Based on all we were armed with for this fight, it was hard not to remain positive.


Was fundraising an important part of the journey?


Pam: Fundraising was a HUGE part of our journey. The money raised through HelpHOPELive helped with anything insurance didn’t cover; the greatest help was when it allowed us to relocate for Nick’s hospital stay. One of the smartest things we did was to keep our family together: from the very beginning, I knew we needed to be at Nick’s side at the hospital 24/7. I knew we had Nick, the sick boy; Mandy, the donor; and two other boys that could potentially get lost in the shuffle. We agreed that keeping together was the best way to maintain some kind of ‘normal’.

Because of the help we received via donations from family and friends, one of us was able to be at Nick’s side every step of the way, and the other parent could be with our other children to provide them with ‘normal’ family time. Our psychologist has since told us that this one act, keeping our family together, was instrumental in getting us through this journey with the least amount of upheaval. Fundraising made that possible for us.

wheelchair friends family Nick Karavite aplastic anemia

Family and friends provided support and fundraising help.


What was the treatment like?


Nick: I went through a few treatments and then chemotherapy. I didn’t realize how sick it would make me. I got chemo for four days. Every night, all I could think about was being one day closer to going home again.

The bone marrow transplant only took a couple of hours, but I had to stay in the hospital for a month afterwards. A lot of people brought me games and things to do in the hospital to pass the time. I wasn’t able to eat for the first two weeks! The doctors wanted me to fill up on protein, but until I could get there, I had to get liquid nutrients through an IV for every single meal to stay healthy. I have a few scars from the treatment process.


What three words would you use to describe how it feels to go through diagnosis and treatment?


Nick: Scary. Unknowing. Shocked.

Nick Karavite aplastic anemia chemotherapy bone marrow transplant

Nick endured chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant.


What advice would you give to another family that is facing a battle with aplastic anemia?


Pam: Well, there is always the obvious: stay off the Internet! I didn’t allow myself to look at how awful this disease can be until after I felt good about where Nick was in his treatment. But my central piece of advice is this: accept help. I can be terrible at doing this myself, but the help we received SAVED us. It is a very humbling experience but a very necessary piece to surviving such a trying ordeal. The emotional scars are certainly here to stay for all of us, but I can honestly say they would be far worse had we not accepted the help everyone so willingly offered.


What do you think everyone out there should know about aplastic anemia or becoming a bone marrow donor?


Nick: They should know that the treatment process is a lot harder than it sounds. Even though it’s not cancer, aplastic anemia can be harder to treat than leukemia.

The chances of living with aplastic anemia without a donor are 50%. It goes up to 80% with a donor. Not only that, but the bone marrow donation process is pretty much painless – all they do is put an IV in you and put you to sleep, then take your bone marrow. The donor’s cells replenish themselves in 4 to 6 weeks.

Mandy Karavite bone marrow donor donationNick Karavite aplastic anemia

Nick received bone marrow from his younger sister, Mandy.

My 6-year-old sister was my donor, and her least favorite part was the over-the-counter medicine she took after the procedure – she didn’t like the taste of it! She was able to keep going with her life right after the procedure. She was out swimming the next day!

Everyone should sign up to be a bone marrow donor. All you have to do is sign up, swab your cheeks and that’s it, and you can save a life.


You just graduated from eighth grade. What are you looking forward to in high school?


Nick: I’m excited about starting a few different classes like biology and math. Science and math are my best subjects. I’ll also have about 15 of my friends starting high school with me.

Pamela Karavite Nick Karavite aplastic anemia recovery graduation eighth grade

Nick graduated from eighth grade with his mom by his side.


What do you want to be when you grow up?


Nick: I love baseball and I would definitely like to play baseball professionally, but I know that might be a long shot. After going through this treatment, one of my career goals is to be an anesthesiologist. Whenever I had a surgery or treatment, I would ask about anesthesia and being an anesthesiologist. It’s a really interesting system. It puts you to sleep very fast! That was a memorable experience.


Baseball is one of your favorite pastimes. What is it that you love about the game?


Nick: I like hitting, pitching, fielding, playing on a team, all of it! I’ve been playing baseball since I was four and started off with tee-ball. My favorite professional teams are the Cubs and Tigers. I’ve been to a Tigers game before. My favorite pitcher is David Price, who pitches for the Tigers. He’s a leftie like me, and he’s a good pitcher.

Nick Karavite baseball bat hospital aplastic anemia

Nick loves to play baseball.


What’s your best pitch?


Nick: Every pitch is my best pitch!


Thank you for the great conversation, Nick and Pam. To learn more about Nick or donate to HelpHOPELive in his honor, visit his Campaign Page.