Tag Archives: motivation

Mobility Matters: “You Are Always Stronger Than You Think You Are”

Just a few days before her final college exams, Morgan Ott fell through scaffolding and became paralyzed from the chest down with limited right hand function. Twenty-two year-old Morgan explains how life has changed since the injury and how mobility impacts her daily life.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan fundraises for mobility essentials


How much did you know about spinal cord injury before you were injured?


Before my injury, I knew little to nothing about spinal cord injury. I have learned a tremendous amount since. When my injury happened, my close friends and family members researched spinal cord injury, the healing process and how my day-to-day life would be affected. I am learning new things every day.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan says she “is learning new things every day”


How did your community respond to your injury?


My family has been by my side from the moment I was in the emergency room. In the beginning, they took me to all of my doctors’ appointments and therapy sessions. Now, they are still always there when I need someone to talk to or if I need any help. Coworkers, friends and the community also reached out to show me their support.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Friends and family have supported Morgan throughout her journey

My friends came to visit me in the hospital often, and one of my sorority sisters set me up with my first fundraising page with a goal of $5,000 on a crowdfunding platform. I switched from a crowdfunding site to HelpHOPELive because I had heard great things about the organization, and how it was easier to continuously raise funds for lifetime expenses with support from HelpHOPELive. Fundraising with HelpHOPELive allows me to request the funds when I need them instead of having to wait until I reach a set goal amount.


Will fundraising influence your mobility options?


Yes! I am currently fundraising for a Galileo tilt table, therapy at Project Walk, a standing frame, an FES system to help my circulation and keep my muscles active, and a Smartdrive power assist device to help me get around more easily by myself.


Have you experienced a range of different emotions since you were injured?


I think I have experienced probably every emotion possible, from extreme happiness to feeling very depressed. I often find that when I am the happiest, I think more about how much better my situation would be if I could just get up and walk again, and then I get very sad. It’s like extreme happiness comes with a price. Most days, though, I am very content and just happy to be where I am.


What do you think is the most common misconception about life in a wheelchair?


A lot of people assume that since I am in a wheelchair I need help with every daily activity or that I can’t live on my own or provide for myself. Most people are also surprised when they find out that I drive (with the use of hand controls).

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

“A lot of people assume…I need help with every daily activity”


What advice would you give to someone else living with a spinal cord injury?


You are always stronger than you think you are. No matter what obstacles life gives you, there are ways to get past them and continue living a healthy life. In terms of working with HelpHOPELive and covering your expenses, it’s never too late to fundraise, but the sooner the better.


Do you still strive to maintain an active lifestyle?


I recently moved down to southern California with my best friend. I am pursuing physical therapy twice a week for two hours per session, and I am finishing school with Arizona State University online. I am planning to get a job within the next couple of weeks to help me keep busy and make money. I also started attending a wheelchair dance class in which there are many other women around my age in chairs learning and performing routines.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan attends a chair-inclusive dance class


What are your biggest mobility priorities at the moment?


I am focused on staying active with my physical therapies. My goal for physical therapy is to work on core strength and balance and gain back any amount of function, no matter how small.


Where would you like to be in five or 10 years?


In five years, I will have graduated from college and hopefully have a steady job that I enjoy. I can see myself in a steady relationship, establishing a life for myself, having done some traveling in Europe and Asia. In 10 years, I would like to have a successful career and a family.


In your video, you say, “We were going to make it through” after the accident. Do you still feel that way?


More so now than when I was in the hospital, I feel like I’m going to make it through. Keeping a positive attitude definitely helps me carry out day-to-day activities with more confidence and happiness.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

“Keeping a positive attitude definitely helps me,” says Morgan


Unlock new mobility possibilities for yourself or someone you love. Start a fundraising campaign with HelpHOPELive at helphopelive.org. Mobility matters!

In Times Of Crisis, Love Brings Us Together

These quotes from individuals and families from all walks of life show just how important love and support can be as you strive to meet the challenges before you.

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Love Keeps Us Strong…


“For the love of our son, Nick, we want to be here for him and his able-bodied brother for as long as possible. That’s what keeps us strong and driven.”

Nick and mom for love quotes post

-Judy, mother of Nick Rouse (injured in 2008)


Love Helps Us Thrive…


“We wouldn’t be thriving as well as we are without love. Love in its many forms is what keeps us pushing forward.”

-Kristen and Jeff Sachs (injured in 2013)


Love Keeps Us Going…


“I believe love plays a big role in health. It is family and friends that keep you going and your spouse or partner and kids that give you the fight to carry on and get a normal life back. #NeverRetreatNeverSurrender”

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Michael Carns (fighting MS)


Love Gives Us Hope…


“Love from family or friends gives a person the will to keep pushing and the hope of a better outcome. If everyday struggles become overwhelming, the distraction of love can soothe the soul.

Love is also a powerful tool. While in the Shepherd Center for two months with my son, I saw people who didn’t have any friends or family to support them, whether it was someone to watch a movie with or someone to give them homemade food or a silly gift. Those people did not thrive in recovery, did not smile or laugh, and did not have the desire to get up and do therapy. There was an employee at the Shepherd Center who gave every person and family member a hug, every single day. She knew the power of love.”

-Lori, mother of John LeMoine (injured in 2014)


Love Keeps Us Healthy…


“Love and the time we spend with each other and people who are special to us has been at the center of Suria’s recovery and it has kept us both healthier. There are times when one of us may not feel well, but after a few laughs, it’s like you’ve been given a special pill that can help fix what ails you. Just the act of loving another can make you love yourself more. You’ll find you start taking extra steps to take care of yourself just to keep that good feeling going.”

-Kirby and Suria Nordin (injured in 2014)


Love Motivates Us…


“On this difficult road to recovery, the love God has for me and the love I have for my family is the source of my strength. It is love that gives me the will to work harder than I thought I could and to keep going when so often I’ve wanted to surrender.”

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Joe Piscitelli (injured in 2014)


Our goal is to help people fundraise within their own communities for their medical and related expenses. It’s true that fundraising can help you secure tangible resources, like medication or physical therapy sessions, that improve your health and quality of life. But fundraising isn’t just about money: fundraising gives your friends and family members the opportunity to lift you up and offer you the emotional support that nourishes you as you face your medical burdens.

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Do you know someone who is struggling with medical expenses and is in need of financial and emotional support? Consider helping him or her to launch a fundraising campaign to ease the burden.

Voices of Hope: Living Well With A Chronic Illness

Anna Crum was in junior high school when she began to experience persistent double vision and sixth cranial nerve palsy in her left eye. An MRI revealed that Anna was fighting relapsing and remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Anna explains how she holds onto hope while fighting the debilitating mental and physical effects of RRMS.

Anna Crum MS HelpHOPELive

Anna Crum is living with multiple sclerosis.


How do your RRMS symptoms disrupt your daily life?


Shortly after the diagnosis, I became legally blind and had to learn to read Braille and rely on a cane for mobility. My current list of symptoms has grown to include a different diplopia (double vision) in each eye, color discrepancy, contrast loss, nerve pain on the left side of my face, muscle weakness in my left leg, short-term memory difficulties, fatigue, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and the occasional slurred speech. Without special lenses, I would not be able to read or drive.

My symptoms are unpredictable. On a given day, there is a long list of things that can go wrong. But you try to plan and compensate as best you can to hopefully manage some of the more severe symptoms to prevent them from hindering your daily life.


What has been the most difficult part of your struggle with RRMS?


MS finds a way to keep chipping away at your independence. In my case, it took everything I had to make it through college. Despite my success, I am now living back at home, unable to work full time and leaning on family for support. MS forces you to reach out. Admitting you need help and accepting it can be very difficult, especially if you are naturally an introverted person who is goal-driven and independent.


Why do you think people with MS sometimes hide their illness from the world?


You encounter enough people who don’t understand and eventually you learn to blend in. I have many times described myself as an illusionist and I am sure other people living with chronic illnesses can relate. People don’t see the preparation or the aftermath.

Everything in my life has become so calculated. I plan how much walking I will need to do in a day, how many hours of energy I have, how much my eyes can handle or how much pain I can tolerate ahead of time. Everything is staged. Seldom do I let people see the daily struggle [and] the days where I can’t even get out of bed.


Do you have a resolution for 2016?


This year, I am focusing on transparency, community and relationships. The National MS Society has a saying: “Multiple sclerosis destroys connections inside us. It disconnects the mind from the body and people from each other.” Too often, people with a chronic illness suffer in silence. When I was first diagnosed, I started advocating for awareness. It was a passion of mine. But eventually I lost the energy. All the energy I had focused on just surviving. Eventually I chose silence for security and traded my voice for a disguise in an attempt to mask my disease.

This year, I want to use my voice again; I want to make an impact. Hopefully my journey will help inspire someone else to keep pushing through. Too often those suffering wait until it’s dire before they reach out for help. Keeping the disease invisible gives it that much more power and it confines you. I want to inspire someone, somewhere, to not give up.


Why do you plan to embrace your MS this year?


At times it feels like a door slams in your face everywhere you turn, but you keep going, one step at a time. Eventually, MS gave me a new path. Because of my disease, I found a passion and hopefully an eventual career as a dietitian. I want to help others manage their symptoms as best as possible, improve their quality of life, and help them learn to thrive despite an illness. Nutrition isn’t a cure, but it can make a huge impact.

Anna Crum HelpHOPELive nutrition

Anna plans to help people with MS manage their nutrition.


What advice can you give to someone newly diagnosed with MS?

Make your health your number one priority. I paid dearly for the instances where my priority became school or some other goal where I pushed myself too hard. Don’t push yourself to go at anyone else’s pace or to meet anyone else’s expectations.

Focusing on what you stand to lose or have lost is too overwhelming. Instead, focus on what your disease adds to your life. This disease builds character, teaches resourcefulness, ingenuity, adaptability, resilience, and gives you a unique perspective. You are stronger than you know, and maybe you can inspire someone with your unique story to find their own strength. Focus on what keeps you hopeful, and hold onto your tenacity.


What does hope mean to you?

To me, hope encompasses endless possibilities. There are always new ways to adapt, a new perspective to discover, new lessons to learn, new relationships to form. There is ALWAYS a reason to keep persevering.


Anna is currently studying to become a registered dietitian and is working on a photography project on the invisible symptoms of MS. She is fundraising with HelpHOPELive for a stem cell transplant that could improve her life with RRMS.