Tag Archives: NMEDA

Mobility Matters: How To Get The Equipment You Need

If your family has been affected by a catastrophic injury or illness, it can be a challenge to cover the costs associated with mobility and quality of life. Fundraising can help you offset the out-of-pocket expenses that come with a disabling injury or illness so you and your family can have a brighter and more mobile future.


What Our Nonprofit Can Do For You


If you are coping with a spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke or a catastrophic illness that affects mobility, we can help you rally your community to raise funds, providing tailored support from one of our expert Fundraising Coordinators. There’s a reason families choose HelpHOPELive over crowdfunding platforms. In addition to one-on-one guidance, HelpHOPELive offers other unique advantages:

  • Nonprofit Status (receive tax deductible donations and corporate and matching grants);
  • Online Donation Page;
  • Bill Pay Support and more.

Mobility expenses are costly. After a spinal cord injury, families may be responsible for $480,000 to $985,000 or more within the first year alone. Lifetime costs associated with an injury range from $500,000 to $3 million depending on severity. Here are just a few of the mobility-related expenses you may want to fundraise for:

  • Health insurance premiums, deductibles and co-pays
  • Medications
  • Travel expenses and temporary relocation costs for rehabilitation and treatment
  • Home medical equipment
  • Home modifications for accessibility
  • Home health care services and caregiving
  • Physical therapy and vocational rehabilitation
  • Experimental treatment

the cost of a spinal cord injury


For people who are living with a catastrophic illness or injury, challenges associated with uncovered medical expenses last a lifetime. HelpHOPELive is often able to help families over many months or years as they face long-term challenges with uncovered medical expenses.

Richard Travia Katie Travia HelpHOPELive

Don’t let expenses hold you back as your life moves forward

Many of our clients offset the cost of their ongoing mobility essentials through annual community events planned with our fundraising expertise. For example:

With an annual Curlathon entering its tenth year, Jeff Harris gives his community a tangible way to contribute to the expenses that allow him to remain independent, including home health care and accessible transportation.

A yearly spaghetti dinner fundraiser helps Aaron Teel continue the rehabilitation that will help him “play soccer, surf, golf, snowboard, skateboard” and improve his quality of life.

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Our Partnership With NMEDA


If your goal is to fundraise for an accessible vehicle, you may qualify for a campaign under our partnership with the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA). As NMEDA CEO Dave Hubbard observed, “Sometimes, the barrier to an automotive mobility solution is a gap in funding.”

Mobility Awareness Month NMEDA

NMEDA established National Mobility Awareness Month (celebrated every May) as an opportunity to raise awareness about why mobility matters and encourage families to learn how they can secure the accessible transportation they need. Through our partnership, we hope to help families across the country experience greater freedom and mobility than ever before.


Voices Of Hope: Jacob Gets His Van


Joining forces with NMEDA is more than just a partnership on paper for our organization: just ask the family of Jacob Norwood. Jacob is a 12-year-old living with FOXG1 Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that causes both physical and cognitive delays (Jacob is one of only 159 known cases of this disorder in the world). Non-mobile, non-verbal and legally blind, Jacob requires full-time care and an assortment of medical supplies to stay healthy.

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Jacob’s family entered the NMEDA Local Heroes competition to win an accessible van that would lift a considerable financial burden off their shoulders. When the contest ended without a win for the Norwoods, they decided to fundraise with HelpHOPELive to make their mobility dream a reality.

With community support and fundraising guidance, the Norwood family was able to raise more than $40,000 and cover the cost of an accessible 2015 Dodge Caravan to help transport Jacob into town, to the park and to medical appointments. As Jacob’s mother, Heather, explained to a local news station, “He is going to be able to have fun and we are going to be able to be a family [with the van]. I still shake my head in disbelief about what we have been able to accomplish and the support that we have.”


Get Started!


Need help covering the out-of-pocket costs associated with vital mobility expenses? Start a fundraising campaign with HelpHOPELive. We’re proud to provide nonprofit accountability and one-on-one fundraising support to help keep you mobile.

Mobility Matters: Community Support Can Open Doors After Injury

As Mobility Awareness Month continues, we hear from Cole Sydnor, who was 16 when a diving accident left him paralyzed from the chest down. Today, almost five years after the accident, loved ones describe him as a fierce competitor, a compassionate friend and a community member dedicated to giving back.

Cole Sydnor HelpHOPELive

Cole coaches the Richmond Sportable Spokes wheelchair basketball team


Are mobility and independence important to you?


Mobility and independence are important no matter who you are. For me specifically, they are of the utmost importance, because a spinal cord injury can prohibit one from enjoying them freely. It has taken great effort to recover some semblance of the mobility and independence I once had. Now that I have, mobility and independence are allowing me to successfully navigate college and even hold a full-time internship away from home.


How has physical therapy impacted your life?


Without physical therapy, not only would I have an incomplete understanding of what I am capable of, I wouldn’t even have built up the strength to reach that potential.


What financial challenges has your family faced since the injury?


Financially, expenses were centered on making everything accessible. That began with adding an elevator to my house and converting my room and bathroom so they would be completely accessible—all three projects were very expensive. We also had to purchase a truck which could accommodate a specific (wheelchair) lift so that I’d be able to drive.

Cole Sydnor HelpHOPELive

The financial strain on Cole’s family was “significant” after injury

To this day, any medical expenses deemed unnecessary by insurance fall on my family, and it becomes their responsibility to make those purchases out of pocket. Expenses add up quickly. One current expense is outpatient physical therapy. On top of paying for college, the financial strain has been significant.


How did your community support you after you were injured?


At the time, I was certain that my life had been irreparably changed for the worse. Motivating myself was not enough to get my butt in gear, so I relied on friends and family to help me find that motivation to work towards recovery. I was able to lean on my loved ones whose encouragement was neverending. Without that presence constantly pushing me forward, it’s likely that I’d still be swallowed by despair, doing nothing and helping no one.

Expenses which go uncovered by insurance can rack up quickly. My elevator, room and bathroom renovation, and truck were all expenses that our community rallied to help fund. Without my community, we would have had no shot at those things and more.

Cole Syndor HelpHOPELive

Friends and family were a big source of support


Can you describe how it felt to go to college away from home?


Well, I was very nervous and apprehensive about going away to college. What comforted me was the proximity of campus to my home and the fact that my brother was going to be living with me. Like when I was first injured, I really relied on the encouragement and support of my friends and loved ones to make the leap to living on campus.

In hindsight, I was over-worried. The transition was surprisingly smooth, largely due to the very accommodating services of University of Richmond. They put in hard paths where they may have only been an off-road path, moved classes to the most accessible buildings, and placed me in a spacious room centrally located on campus.


What do you think the average person doesn’t realize about spinal cord injuries?


The average person may not understand the extent to which our injuries affect us “behind the scenes.” Most people only encounter people with spinal cord injuries when they are out in public but are never exposed to what it takes for them to shower, dress, use the restroom, etc. Those are the hardest parts about living with a spinal cord injury and unless someone makes an effort to understand, he or she may never realize it.


What are you most proud of?


I’ve been able to raise awareness about spinal cord injuries and spread a message about the importance of diving safety to youth in my community and beyond. A mother told me a story of how her son jumped off a river dock and broke his leg, not realizing that the water was very shallow. She was angry with him, but then he told her, “Mom, I didn’t dive. I remembered Cole’s story.”

Cole Sydnor

Cole is proud of his diving safety advocacy work


What are you looking forward to this year?


First and foremost, I’m looking forward to helping out with a fundraising event which will benefit a foundation that offers private scholarships for varsity or collegiate athletes who have been injured or become chronically ill. Next, I would say graduating from college. After that, if I could land a stable job in my field of interest, I would be stoked.

Most of all though, I look forward to the day that there is a cure for spinal cord injuries. My life would be transformed in an instant, the same way it was on the day I was injured. To me, the word “hope” means that one day I’ll walk again.


Do you know someone who needs community support to live a mobile and independent life after injury? Learn more about fundraising for mobility essentials at helphopelive.org. Mobility matters!

Mobility Matters: “You Are Always Stronger Than You Think You Are”

Just a few days before her final college exams, Morgan Ott fell through scaffolding and became paralyzed from the chest down with limited right hand function. Twenty-two year-old Morgan explains how life has changed since the injury and how mobility impacts her daily life.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan fundraises for mobility essentials


How much did you know about spinal cord injury before you were injured?


Before my injury, I knew little to nothing about spinal cord injury. I have learned a tremendous amount since. When my injury happened, my close friends and family members researched spinal cord injury, the healing process and how my day-to-day life would be affected. I am learning new things every day.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan says she “is learning new things every day”


How did your community respond to your injury?


My family has been by my side from the moment I was in the emergency room. In the beginning, they took me to all of my doctors’ appointments and therapy sessions. Now, they are still always there when I need someone to talk to or if I need any help. Coworkers, friends and the community also reached out to show me their support.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Friends and family have supported Morgan throughout her journey

My friends came to visit me in the hospital often, and one of my sorority sisters set me up with my first fundraising page with a goal of $5,000 on a crowdfunding platform. I switched from a crowdfunding site to HelpHOPELive because I had heard great things about the organization, and how it was easier to continuously raise funds for lifetime expenses with support from HelpHOPELive. Fundraising with HelpHOPELive allows me to request the funds when I need them instead of having to wait until I reach a set goal amount.


Will fundraising influence your mobility options?


Yes! I am currently fundraising for a Galileo tilt table, therapy at Project Walk, a standing frame, an FES system to help my circulation and keep my muscles active, and a Smartdrive power assist device to help me get around more easily by myself.


Have you experienced a range of different emotions since you were injured?


I think I have experienced probably every emotion possible, from extreme happiness to feeling very depressed. I often find that when I am the happiest, I think more about how much better my situation would be if I could just get up and walk again, and then I get very sad. It’s like extreme happiness comes with a price. Most days, though, I am very content and just happy to be where I am.


What do you think is the most common misconception about life in a wheelchair?


A lot of people assume that since I am in a wheelchair I need help with every daily activity or that I can’t live on my own or provide for myself. Most people are also surprised when they find out that I drive (with the use of hand controls).

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

“A lot of people assume…I need help with every daily activity”


What advice would you give to someone else living with a spinal cord injury?


You are always stronger than you think you are. No matter what obstacles life gives you, there are ways to get past them and continue living a healthy life. In terms of working with HelpHOPELive and covering your expenses, it’s never too late to fundraise, but the sooner the better.


Do you still strive to maintain an active lifestyle?


I recently moved down to southern California with my best friend. I am pursuing physical therapy twice a week for two hours per session, and I am finishing school with Arizona State University online. I am planning to get a job within the next couple of weeks to help me keep busy and make money. I also started attending a wheelchair dance class in which there are many other women around my age in chairs learning and performing routines.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan attends a chair-inclusive dance class


What are your biggest mobility priorities at the moment?


I am focused on staying active with my physical therapies. My goal for physical therapy is to work on core strength and balance and gain back any amount of function, no matter how small.


Where would you like to be in five or 10 years?


In five years, I will have graduated from college and hopefully have a steady job that I enjoy. I can see myself in a steady relationship, establishing a life for myself, having done some traveling in Europe and Asia. In 10 years, I would like to have a successful career and a family.


In your video, you say, “We were going to make it through” after the accident. Do you still feel that way?


More so now than when I was in the hospital, I feel like I’m going to make it through. Keeping a positive attitude definitely helps me carry out day-to-day activities with more confidence and happiness.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

“Keeping a positive attitude definitely helps me,” says Morgan


Unlock new mobility possibilities for yourself or someone you love. Start a fundraising campaign with HelpHOPELive at helphopelive.org. Mobility matters!