Tag Archives: pay it forward

Meet My Second Family: HelpHOPELive

Liam Murray began volunteering with HelpHOPELive two years ago and has been a member of our board of directors for the past year.  He also serves on our Development Committee. We sat down with Liam to talk about what charitable giving means to him and his family.

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Liam and his family enjoy the Radnor Hunt Races, a Kolff Society event


Why do you donate to HelpHOPELive? 


I donate because I love the mission. I love that the organization serves a very practical purpose at a point in a person’s life when they are most vulnerable. When someone is diagnosed with a life-changing illness or suffers a sudden catastrophic injury, the last thing they should have to worry about is who is going to pay for this.

I personally know three people who could have benefited from HelpHOPELive, but neither I nor they were aware it existed at the time. This organization is absolutely needed in communities around the country and making people aware of its existence is a personal mission of mine.

This is why I donate specifically to the unrestricted (general operating) fund and volunteer with the development committee to position more people to support HelpHOPELive to help us expand our reach even further.


What does charitable giving mean to you and your family (not just financially)?


Being able to donate means we are very lucky as a family. Life can change in an instant. Today I have the ability to give a little bit of time and money; tomorrow I may rely on others to donate that time and money to me or my family. We give while we can because you never know when you’ll be on the other end.

There is also something about being part of the organization to which you are giving which has deep meaning to me. I absolutely love the people at HelpHOPELive. They have welcomed me as if I were a member of the family, and that means a lot. My ideas, even the terrible ones, are considered and I’m asked my opinion all the time.


What do you hope to share with your children about charitable giving?


I hope to lead by example. I hope they understand how lucky they are to be in the position to give, and that it is both a privilege and a responsibility. It is also not something you do and forget about. I hope they see for themselves that it needs to be something that becomes part of your life so long as you are able.


Do you have any advice for first-time donors?


Every dollar you give, you get two back. Not sure why it works like that, but it does.


What if I don’t have a lot of money to give away? Can I still make an impact?


I might just suggest that there is power in community. When the HelpHOPELive Fundraising and Patient Services Team works on a new campaign, they don’t expect a single donor to give thousands of dollars, they know it takes a lot of small donations to reach their fundraising goals. Donate what you can, whether that is time or money and you will be surprised how far it can go. At least I have been!

The team at HelpHOPELive, across all departments, has a magical ability to take modest amounts of money and accomplish incredible things. I wouldn’t donate unless I had profound respect for the team putting my money to work for a good cause.

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Liam with his wife, Ashley, and his daughter, Joee


Can you open your heart this year to help us provide meaningful fundraising assistance to thousands of families? Donate now at helphopelive.org.

Has Fundraising Helped You? You Can Pay It Forward!

Has fundraising had a positive impact on your life? You have an opportunity to give back to your community and support other families facing a medical crisis. Last week, we featured Danielle Bailey, who has helped several local families kick-start their fundraising efforts with HelpHOPELive. This week, we feature five tried-and-true ways to start making a difference today.

pay it forward


…supporting families who are going through a similar situation.


You can help families navigate through the same challenges you’ve overcome. As heart transplant recipient Rick Brittell explains, “Before I got my heart, I was so tired of being away from home and isolated. Then my social worker reached out and asked if [my wife and I] would be willing to meet with a patient at the hospital who was facing a similar situation. We began to focus on supporting others. We started a support group in the local area that was open to lung and heart transplant candidates and recipients, caregivers and people who were grieving.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

You can be a vital source of support for another family.

Rick notes that this kind of support can make a tangible difference in someone’s life: “The doctors have said to us, ’You don’t know how much of a difference you have made.’ They even told us that people are being released 3-4 days earlier than average now that we are there to provide support!


…referring families to HelpHOPELive for nonprofit fundraising support.


Do you know someone who needs help fundraising for medical and related expenses? Help him or her understand how HelpHOPELive can help. Point other families in need to helphopelive.org for more information. If you would like additional resources to share with others who may need our help, contact us today.

Diane Maxwell, wife of transplant recipient Mark Maxwell, explains how she helped another family find us: “I met Jude Jamieson through a woman’s retreat, where I learned that she also had a husband with a chronic illness in need of a transplant. I encouraged her to contact HelpHOPELive and start a fundraising campaign since her husband’s transplant hospital required a $5,000 account balance at minimum to list a patient for transplant. They were able to raise the funds through the summer and fall. Her husband went into acute liver failure, but less than a week later, he had a new liver thanks to their fundraising efforts. All I did was be bold enough to suggest she contact HelpHOPELive. You guys did the rest, right on time.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Diane referred Kevin and family to HelpHOPELive for fundraising help


…supporting HelpHOPELive’s mission.


Every donation to our nonprofit helps families across the country receive tangible and compassionate fundraising support. You know firsthand how important that support can be when a medical crisis strikes. Become a monthly contributor to HelpHOPELive today and begin paying it forward to families who need our help to combat the high cost of medical and related care.

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Want to see the true impact of your gift? Keep up with stories of hope on our Blog and on our website, or get a handpicked selection of tips and stories in your inbox every month!


…using your next fundraiser to serve the community.


As Heidi Anderson, mother of 2-year-old transplant recipient Deanna, explains, “Deanna lived in the hospital for more than three months before her transplant. We were visited by many people during that time, including volunteers who would bring her toys and gifts. It truly touched my heart. I see so many children at the hospital now who really need a smile.” Heidi knew a fundraiser in honor of Deanna could provide a way to give back, so she “decided to collect toys for kids at the hospital through a toy drive as part of one of Deanna’s Valentine’s Day HelpHOPELive fundraisers.”

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The toy collection was a huge success, says Heidi: “So many people brought toys! It made me incredibly happy! We are still collecting today.


…donating in honor of a particular family.


After getting her own fundraising campaign rolling, LAM fighter and transplant candidate Nicole Seefeldt found a way to pay it forward. “I met Alyssa Mebs while I was getting my transplant evaluation,” says Nicole. “We just started talking one night and we became fast friends. Once I saw that Alyssa was fundraising for a transplant, I thought, what can I do to help her? I knew I was going to meet my first fundraising goal…so I donated what I had to give in her honor.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Nicole, left, made a donation to HelpHOPELive in honor of Alyssa

Today, when Nicole asks for donations or donates to a fellow HelpHOPELive client, she keeps this advice in mind: “It’s not the dollar amount you give, it’s that you give at all. Not everybody has a lot of money, but since it’s tax-deductible, every penny is something that they can use that compounds the effect. I never want to put an amount that people have to give. I just encourage them to give what they can.”


You don’t have to have it all to give back.


As Heidi Anderson explains, “Giving back is something we should all consider. Whether you do it with a toy drive or something else, paying it forward is about giving love and kindness to others who need it most.”

Today, consider how you can give back to the community that has given you so much. If you have a great idea for giving back, contact us and we may feature your campaign in an upcoming Blog post!

How You Can Step Up To Support A Family Facing A Medial Crisis

Donating to HelpHOPELive isn’t the only way to support a family facing the financial and emotional burdens associated with a transplant. Just ask Danielle Bailey, who has helped three HelpHOPELive clients plan bingo and poker fundraisers using her event planning experience. Learn why Danielle pours her time, energy and expertise into helping these families, and you’ll be inspired to do the same!

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle, left, supports multiple HelpHOPELive families


How did you get involved in fundraising?


My first event was to help fundraise for a little girl with a double cochlear implant who was having trouble securing state funds to attend a school for children with hearing loss. I helped to plan a bingo event, since everyone has fun playing bingo and it’s a great way to raise money and have fun. We were able to raise $400 for her.

Since then, I have been involved with events raising funds for several causes, including autism awareness, cancer awareness, canine companions, and kids’ medical needs. As an AVON representative, in addition to helping plan fundraisers, I typically reserve a table at each fundraising event to show support and advertise my services and I donate raffle prizes.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle has engaged in fundraising for several nonprofit causes


How are you connected to the HelpHOPELive families you help?


[Former HelpHOPELive client] Mary Jo Lovely is my mother. She made the decision to donate my stepfather (Stephen Boyes)’ organs in 1998 when he suddenly passed away. She was diagnosed with COPD and was put on 24/7 oxygen at 42. She was put on the transplant waiting list and she received her first single lung transplant in July 2007. A year and a half later, swine flu hit our family and the disease immediately put my mother’s body into a state of rejection. She received her second lung transplant in June 2015.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle’s mother “received her second lung transplant in June 2015”

I met [HelpHOPELive client] Karlene Novotny in 1998 when she did my taxes. We clicked right away. She opened her own business which I followed for a few years before she became sick. I saw her name in a news article shared on Facebook and we got back in contact. I was shocked to learn how sick she was and how much she had gone through since we lost contact.

I first met Natalie Meyers in person on March 12, 2016 while I was hosting the bingo fundraiser in honor of Karlene. She had just started fundraising with HelpHOPELive a few days before the event. A co-worker shared her story with me and I reached out to her, contacted the local fire company and started the planning process to help her with a fundraising event. I invited her to the bingo fundraiser in honor of Karlene so that she could see how events were managed to better prepare herself for the event in her honor later this year.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Flyer designed by HelpHOPELive for the upcoming event


What’s the hardest part about planning a fundraiser?


I give myself a good six months to plan everything to limit hurdles along the way. I send donation requests to local businesses, find vendors to set up at the event, make sure there is advertising via social media and flyers in local groceries stories where permitted, and so much more. The hardest part is waiting for the event to happen!

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

This year, Danielle is expanding her wheelhouse to include poker events


What is the most satisfying part of planning a fundraiser?


There is so much that is fulfilling about fundraising. Being able to help someone in need gives you such an amazing feeling. The most satisfying part is seeing a room full of 200 people pulling together to help a single person. Seeing local businesses helping the community also makes you proud to be a part of it.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle loves ” seeing a room full of…people pulling together to help”

Knowing I helped make it all happen for a great cause gives me such a sense of accomplishment! I love helping where I am needed. The actual amount raised may not be like winning the lottery, but for these families, it’s close because of the tremendous impact. Every little bit counts.


Do you help because you expect these families to pay you back in the future?


No way. I do not expect anything from anyone that I help. I just do it to get the feeling of being able to help, and that is enough for me.


Can fundraising be both emotionally and financially significant?


After my mom had her first transplant, I realized how much everything related to the transplant was going to cost. When your family is stressing out about how they are going to pay for the transplant and the medications that will keep them alive, it can honestly tear them apart. That stress can affect the entire family and fundraising can make a difference.

I have referred people to HelpHOPELive for years. I love that the funds raised go directly to the individual’s medical needs and not into some CEO’s pocket!


What does the word HOPE mean to you?


HOPE is life! Every day we take advantage of the things we’re given. We were all dealt a certain hand in life; it is who we are and what will make us stronger. Help those who are less fortune, because someday you may be the one who needs help.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

“Someday you may be the one who needs help,” said Danielle


Like Danielle, you can make a difference for a family facing a medical crisis. Start a fundraising campaign with our nonprofit today at helphopelive.org. Learn how to help an existing HelpHOPELive family by calling 800.642.8399.

Life On The Heart Transplant Waiting List

Patrick McEntee was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy in 1996. By 2008, he had experienced two strokes and a non-obstructive heart attack. He received an LVAD in 2014 and began fundraising with HelpHOPELive six months after being listed for transplant. In honor of Heart Month, here are Patrick’s observations after a year and a half on the transplant waiting list.

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Pat received an LVAD in 2014


The Physical Impact


I was evaluated for transplant at the Cleveland Clinic in August 2014 and again in September 2014. I was admitted to the hospital immediately upon completion of that second evaluation and was officially listed for transplant that month. My LVAD was put in two days later. It was strange because I had walked – struggling to do so, but still walking on my own – to appointments all over the Clinic’s campus that Friday, and doctors thought I would be listed as a low-priority Level 2 on the waiting list. By Monday, they wouldn’t allow me to get out of bed. I didn’t feel any different, but I went with what they told me. Things escalated very quickly.

The LVAD knocked me for a loop. I didn’t quite know what I was in for. I was sedated for three days after the procedure and I spent a few more days in the ICU. I was in the hospital for a month total. I knew I was going for transplant evaluations, but I really had no idea that I would be there for a month. I thought I’d be returning home the same day. I got the LVAD and it was clear I wasn’t going to be able to continue working and living. I had to apply for disability and prepare for transplant.


Financial Challenges


When you go for a heart transplant evaluation, you don’t just see a transplant coordinator. You also see a cardiologist, a bone doctor, a dentist, a dermatologist and more–and there are expenses associated with each. It’s $30 every time I walk up to a doctor’s desk, plus parking and travel: it’s a 3.5-hour drive to Cleveland and 3.5 hours back home every time I have an appointment. I’m there at least once a month, and I’ve been admitted to the hospital twice during regular appointments since the LVAD was put in to help prepare my body for transplant.

Pat makes a 3.5-hour drive to his transplant center.

Pat faces a 3.5-hour drive to his transplant center


The Role of Fundraising


I’m honestly overwhelmed at the support I’ve been receiving. I’ve had family members, friends, and even friends-of-friends and anonymous donors make significant donations. Most of my fundraising has happened through online sharing and word-of-mouth. The most unnerving thing financially is not really knowing what medications I’ll be on and how much they will cost. Thanks to fundraising, even if I’m looking at $1,000 per month out-of-pocket with prescriptions, I have enough built up that I would be able to cover it for quite a while.


Finding Gratitude


The realization that there are certain things I can’t do is a challenge. Seventy- and 80-year-olds say that, but here I am at 41 saying that myself. But overall, I’m very thankful for the situation that I’m in. I’d love to be completely healthy, obviously, but it is what it is. I’m happy to be able to come and go and do what I want and still have a decent level of independence at this stage.

My wife has been tremendous. She has helped me take it day by day and roll with the changes. She has to be careful now about scheduling her travel for work in case I get ‘the call’ or need her help. It’s a toll that she’s happy to deal with, but it does get in the way of her being able to do what she wants or needs to do at times. For me it’s about staying positive, because I’m surrounded by my wife, my family, my friends and even strangers who are willing to jump in and help out. If you’re a positive person, I think people around you will often respond in that way.

I am grateful for the prayers from thousands of people from all over the country – many people, including strangers, have told me they pray for me daily. It’s truly humbling. My faith has taught me to be grateful for the extra time I have been given in this life, no matter how much more I get. I could easily be dead by now, but I am alive, which I take to mean that God has more for me to learn and accomplish in this life.


Unexpected Benefits


My sister has had similar heart-related issues within the past year. One of the benefits of not being able to work was being able to look out for her and take her to appointments. Beyond that, I’ve started to volunteer with some of the medical centers, talking to patients who are considering an LVAD or have just received one. I explain my experience to them. I’ve really appreciated being able to do that. I see it as almost a ministry, talking to these patients to give them my take on it.


Getting (Too) Comfortable


It’s one thing to say, okay, I’m used to this and this is the new normal. But I have to keep reminding myself that I could get the call at any time. There was a time after the LVAD that I didn’t feel like I was ready to get the call. Today, I still try to imagine what I’ll be doing when I get the call and how I’ll react. Am I going to be able to drop everything and go? If I got the call right now, I’d have to grab a bag and be out the door and tell my wife to meet me up there. It’s a fine line: I want to continue with life and not end up sitting there doing nothing, just waiting.

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Pat describes the “fine line” between preparing for transplant and continuing to live life


The Role Of Humor


Some might see my wife and my sense of humor as a bit morbid, but I find that laughing about our situation is helpful. For Christmas, my wife gave me an anatomically-correct plush heart and said, “Until the real thing comes along.” She also gave me a pair of socks with gold hearts and “heart of gold” stitched on them. Friends on Facebook helped me create a cardioversion playlist with songs like “Electric Avenue,” “Kickstart My Heart,” and “We Got The Beat.” A sense of humor is mandatory in dealing with the unknown of the process of waiting for a transplant.

"Until the real thing comes along..."

“Until the real thing comes along…”


What To Do While You’re Waiting


The important thing is to keep living your life and doing as much as you can. While I’m not working, I wake up and ask, what is my purpose today? Some days my purpose is to sit on the couch and watch TV. But other days I’ll say, today I’m going to do some writing. Today I’m going to read a book. Today I’m going to the grocery store. Whatever it is that you’re able to do, do it.

Get involved in whatever ways you can in life. For example, through volunteering. I found that very rewarding and helpful. Be willing to give of yourself. A lot of people would agree with me that when you give, you receive. It’s nice to tell your story and hear the stories of others.

Lastly, I would add, stay active. It’s not unusual to gain weight with the LVAD, so exercising as much as possible is incredibly important. I know it’s difficult when you are in heart failure but it’s a way to ensure you can be as strong as possible when the call comes.


Follow Patrick’s story or make a donation in his honor on his HelpHOPELive Campaign Page. Have your own transplant story to tell? Reach out to us on Facebook.