Tag Archives: post-transplant bills

How You Can Step Up To Support A Family Facing A Medial Crisis

Donating to HelpHOPELive isn’t the only way to support a family facing the financial and emotional burdens associated with a transplant. Just ask Danielle Bailey, who has helped three HelpHOPELive clients plan bingo and poker fundraisers using her event planning experience. Learn why Danielle pours her time, energy and expertise into helping these families, and you’ll be inspired to do the same!

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle, left, supports multiple HelpHOPELive families


How did you get involved in fundraising?


My first event was to help fundraise for a little girl with a double cochlear implant who was having trouble securing state funds to attend a school for children with hearing loss. I helped to plan a bingo event, since everyone has fun playing bingo and it’s a great way to raise money and have fun. We were able to raise $400 for her.

Since then, I have been involved with events raising funds for several causes, including autism awareness, cancer awareness, canine companions, and kids’ medical needs. As an AVON representative, in addition to helping plan fundraisers, I typically reserve a table at each fundraising event to show support and advertise my services and I donate raffle prizes.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle has engaged in fundraising for several nonprofit causes


How are you connected to the HelpHOPELive families you help?


[Former HelpHOPELive client] Mary Jo Lovely is my mother. She made the decision to donate my stepfather (Stephen Boyes)’ organs in 1998 when he suddenly passed away. She was diagnosed with COPD and was put on 24/7 oxygen at 42. She was put on the transplant waiting list and she received her first single lung transplant in July 2007. A year and a half later, swine flu hit our family and the disease immediately put my mother’s body into a state of rejection. She received her second lung transplant in June 2015.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle’s mother “received her second lung transplant in June 2015”

I met [HelpHOPELive client] Karlene Novotny in 1998 when she did my taxes. We clicked right away. She opened her own business which I followed for a few years before she became sick. I saw her name in a news article shared on Facebook and we got back in contact. I was shocked to learn how sick she was and how much she had gone through since we lost contact.

I first met Natalie Meyers in person on March 12, 2016 while I was hosting the bingo fundraiser in honor of Karlene. She had just started fundraising with HelpHOPELive a few days before the event. A co-worker shared her story with me and I reached out to her, contacted the local fire company and started the planning process to help her with a fundraising event. I invited her to the bingo fundraiser in honor of Karlene so that she could see how events were managed to better prepare herself for the event in her honor later this year.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Flyer designed by HelpHOPELive for the upcoming event


What’s the hardest part about planning a fundraiser?


I give myself a good six months to plan everything to limit hurdles along the way. I send donation requests to local businesses, find vendors to set up at the event, make sure there is advertising via social media and flyers in local groceries stories where permitted, and so much more. The hardest part is waiting for the event to happen!

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

This year, Danielle is expanding her wheelhouse to include poker events


What is the most satisfying part of planning a fundraiser?


There is so much that is fulfilling about fundraising. Being able to help someone in need gives you such an amazing feeling. The most satisfying part is seeing a room full of 200 people pulling together to help a single person. Seeing local businesses helping the community also makes you proud to be a part of it.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

Danielle loves ” seeing a room full of…people pulling together to help”

Knowing I helped make it all happen for a great cause gives me such a sense of accomplishment! I love helping where I am needed. The actual amount raised may not be like winning the lottery, but for these families, it’s close because of the tremendous impact. Every little bit counts.


Do you help because you expect these families to pay you back in the future?


No way. I do not expect anything from anyone that I help. I just do it to get the feeling of being able to help, and that is enough for me.


Can fundraising be both emotionally and financially significant?


After my mom had her first transplant, I realized how much everything related to the transplant was going to cost. When your family is stressing out about how they are going to pay for the transplant and the medications that will keep them alive, it can honestly tear them apart. That stress can affect the entire family and fundraising can make a difference.

I have referred people to HelpHOPELive for years. I love that the funds raised go directly to the individual’s medical needs and not into some CEO’s pocket!


What does the word HOPE mean to you?


HOPE is life! Every day we take advantage of the things we’re given. We were all dealt a certain hand in life; it is who we are and what will make us stronger. Help those who are less fortune, because someday you may be the one who needs help.

Danielle Bailey HelpHOPELive

“Someday you may be the one who needs help,” said Danielle


Like Danielle, you can make a difference for a family facing a medical crisis. Start a fundraising campaign with our nonprofit today at helphopelive.org. Learn how to help an existing HelpHOPELive family by calling 800.642.8399.

Touched By Transplant: What It Feels Like To Get A Heart

In August 2015, John “Skeeter” Coleman was diagnosed with end-stage heart failure. In October 2015, Skeeter and his family began fundraising with HelpHOPELive to prepare for a lifesaving heart transplant. This is the story of how Skeeter received his new heart.

touched by transplant full


I was the “best of the worst,” the doctors said when they put me on the heart transplant waiting list. They said I’d have a heart within seven days. Fourteen days later, they told me to “keep up the positive attitude.” They told me my heart was coming.

John Skeeter Coleman HelpHOPELive heart transplant hospital

In the hospital with grandson Maxson

On the 21st day of waiting, a committee got together at the medical center to work out how to get me an LVAD as a bridge to transplant. No sooner had they convened, someone came into their meeting and said, “We just found a heart for Skeeter.” All the doctors I had worked with came running down to my room. I thought, “What is going on? This looks bad.” Then one of them came forward and said, “We found you a heart.” We hugged; it was a joyous moment.


The average wait time for a heart is about four months.


That night, the anesthesiologist came in with two orderlies to wheel me to the operating room. I said, “Let’s go. I’ve been waiting for this.” They took me to the elevator, and wouldn’t you know it, the bed got stuck and they couldn’t get it out! They kept trying and trying until I said, “This is crazy. Y’all just stop right here.” I got up, no shoes, no socks, rear end flapping in the breeze, and I said, “This is my last walk with this old heart. Leave that bed right there. We have a heart to transplant.”

They followed me right to the operating room. The doctors in the operating room were speechless, and then they all burst out laughing. That’s the last thing I remember before the operation.

Skeeter Coleman HelpHOPELive

With niece Tricia

The operation lasted six hours. When they brought me out into the recovery room, the doctor noticed I was passing a lot of blood, more blood than he had anticipated. They took me right back into the operating room, opened me back up, found a leak, repaired it, stitched me up, and I was put on a ventilator in the recovery unit for three days.

When I woke up, I couldn’t really move or see because of the anesthesia. All I saw was white. I thought I was dead. Then I heard a voice and the voice said, “Daddy!” It was my daughter’s voice.

“I can’t see you,” I said.

My daughter said, “It’s okay. You’re doing okay. But the Cowboys lost.”

And I said, “That’s terrible. But I’m alive?

She said, “Yes, you’re alive.”

Skeeter Coleman HelpHOPELive

With daughter Kelly

Five hours later I came out of the anesthesia fully, and I was alive. It was just wonderful. All my doctors came back in and told me I was doing okay. I still had in my breathing tube. The next day, the doctor just reached over and ripped it right out and said, “Take a deep breath.” That was like a miracle. I could breathe again. It was the greatest feeling in the world.

My daughter walked into the room with a stethoscope. I don’t even know where she got that thing from. She said, “How would you like to listen to your new heart?” That was amazing, just sitting there listening to the new heart beat.


62,754 people have received heart transplants since 1988 thanks to organs from deceased donors.


Fundraising For A Heart Transplant

I stayed in the hospital for almost a month as they adjusted my meds and looked for signs of rejection. When I left the hospital, I was still getting blood drawn every week. I started a new medicine after a rejection scare that cost $1,000 out of pocket for one week’s supply–it wasn’t covered by medical insurance. That right there is why you need HelpHOPELive

first time outside after 60 days

Skeeter stayed in the hospital for almost a month post-transplant

Today, I still have to return to the hospital every three weeks for heart biopsies and every two weeks for med adjustments and blood tests. That’s where HelpHOPELive donations have been incredibly helpful, for medications and doctor’s visit co-pays that are out of pocket, plus the cost of transportation. I go to cardiac therapy three days per week and physical therapy three days per week.

You never know from day to day what expenses you will get hit with. In therapy, for instance, they may recommend a special sling that isn’t covered by insurance, so you have to buy it outright. It costs $100. Then they say, well, you’re going to need this other special piece of equipment, too. That’s another out-of-pocket expense. These expenses can add up to the point that they eat you alive.

10th heart biopsy Facebook

Skeeter at the 10th biopsy of his new heart

Doctors may advise you to switch to different medications, or they may even double up on medications. Sometimes medical insurance only pays for a 30-day supply once a month, and they will not increase that to twice a month even if the doctors recommend it. Other times, you’ll get hit with a bill for something unexpected. I got a bill the other day for $38,675 for X-rays. You sit around and wait for answers, and you think, “How can I pay these bills? I can’t do it.” You just never know what’s coming. Insurance can’t pay for everything and neither can supplemental insurance. That’s why HelpHOPELive is important to me.

with old heart

“You just never know what’s coming,” said Skeeter, pictured with his old heart


According to data from 2012, 76.8% of heart recipients are still living five years post-transplant.


“I’m Glad They Kept Me Alive”

My advice to others is to stay positive and get rid of negative people. Concentrate on making other people aware of all of the good things that organ donation can do. I’ve got a positive attitude, and I try to stay busy fundraising, managing my finances and doing my exercises. I’m looking forward to figuring out how I can help people to be more aware of organ donation and what it means to be willing to donate their heart.

I woke up today. I can breathe. I can walk. I’m alive. I’m healthy. I have friends like all of you.

I’m glad they kept me alive. Life is good. Here I am, and I can see the sun shining.

With son Alan Coleman


HelpHOPELive, Donate Life Month, donate life, Touched By Transplant, transplants, kidney transplant, liver transplant, pancreas transplant, transplant costs, transplant medications, meds, paying for transplant

Follow our Blog to learn what happened when Skeeter met the wife and children of his heart donor!