Tag Archives: Radnor

How “The Porkanizer” Overcame The Odds To Become A BBQ Legend

Sandy Fulton is not your average event planner. Under the affectionate nickname, “The Porkanizer,” Sandy organizes and grows events with passion and expertise from her lifetime of work in the hospitality industry.

Sandy Fulton Fire Up Hope

Sandy Fulton, center, is “The Porkanizer”

Sandy is a Kansas City Barbeque Society (KCBS) Contest Organizer and a member of the KCBS Board of Directors. She helps organize KSBC-sanctioned competitions including Philly’s Inaugural Fire Up Hope BBQ Festival, an event on September 10- 11, 2016 at the Devon Horse Show Grounds to benefit HelpHOPELive. We picked her brain about her career beginnings, the accident that changed her life and how to plan a successful BBQ fundraiser.

Fire Up Hope BBQ

Sandy is helping to organize the Fire Up Hope BBQ Festival to benefit HelpHOPELive


Sandy, how did you get your start in the hospitality industry?


More than 25 years ago I was a restaurant owner in Ocean City, Maryland, and after that I worked at the Ocean City Convention Center. I really fell in love with promoting and booking conventions and events at the Center. From there, I spent 15 years in the hotel industry in sales working in promotion and training sales departments for hotels all over the country. I was asked to be the executive director of Tourism for Wicomico County, Maryland.

Sandy Fulton Fire Up Hope

“This job was my destiny,” said Sandy

That job was my destiny. I began to use all of my experience in sales, promotions, food and beverage, and marketing to promote our county. I contacted KCBS and held my first BBQ festival in Salisbury, Maryland. in 2002. Within 3 years, the event grew to be the largest of its kind this side of the Mississippi. After I retired in 2012, I was asked to promote another BBQ festival. That grew into managing seven events per year.


You had to retire early due to medical challenges. Was that a difficult time for you?


Yes, probably the most difficult time in my life. I fell and broke my hip and arm. It was assumed that in four to six weeks I could go back to work. After a few weeks, the pain in my hip and leg became worse: my hip was out of socket and my pelvis was broken, seemingly during the initial operation. Four more operations to correct the areas had failed. As soon as I stood, my hip fell out and I would be standing on my ankle.

I was finally put in an ambulance by my doctor and taken into a six-hour operation. I was told I probably would never walk again. I was so distraught.

Hospital

Sandy was told by her doctor she would probably never walk again

I spent six weeks in the hospital and six weeks in rehab. I began physical therapy at home and in a nearby facility. I was in a wheelchair, and I was determined not to stay in a wheelchair for the rest of my life. It was obvious by then that I would not be able to return to work. My job was a very active job and with the pain and limitations, I had no choice but to retire. I cried for days. I loved my job so much. I felt that the job was my destiny, and that I had prepared all my life for that job.

I was given a wonderful retirement party with county and state officials in attendance and many awards and recognitions. That made it hurt even more. I was devastated. I decided to concentrate on walking again. I had to. It took me three years, but I was able to walk with a cane. I am grateful to my family, friends, therapy and, of course, God for believing in me.


Can you tell us a little about the KCBS? Why is its approval important?


KCBS is an organization that promotes the love of BBQ. It is the largest organization of its kind, and it is not only based in the United States. It has become a worldwide organization with contests in Europe, Puerto Rico and other regions.

Sandy Fulton Fire Up Hope

KCBS promotes a passion for BBQ through events and engagement

The organization has very strict rules and the judging is done by people who have taken a KCBS Judges class. They judge based on appearance, taste and tenderness.


Why did you decide to specialize in KCBS-sanctioned events?


I made the decision based on my love of creating an event, and the BBQ people that I met and the loyalty they showed me. It is also such a great way to introduce BBQ to new areas.

BBQ

Event planning provides an opportunity “to introduce BBQ to new areas”

KCBS really supports nonprofits. 90% of my events are for nonprofits. The competitors love that element and so do those attending. They get to have fun and help a charity at the same time. When holding a fundraiser, advertising that it is for a charitable cause is very important.


How did your first 2002 KCBS-sanctioned event evolve over time?


Initially, we had three months to put it together and 17 competitors. Each year, we added something new to the event to keep people interested. We eventually had to put a limit on the numbers of competitors, food vendors and craft vendors because we were running out of space! We advertised a great deal and that helped. People started planning for the event months in advance. We added a children’s section and that really helped the event, too.

Sandy Fulton Fire Up Hope

Sandy loves to watch her events grow over time


What is your favorite part of your job? Your least favorite?


My favorite part is working with the competitors. They have stood by me and encouraged me when I had to retire. When I held my first festival, I walked into their meeting and they gave me a standing ovation. That’s when I knew that everything was going to be alright.

My least favorite part of my job is after the competition and awards (ceremony) when they all leave me!

Sandy Fulton Fire Up Hope

Sandy’s favorite part of event planning is “working with the competitors”


What does the word HOPE mean to you?


The word hope had a different meaning to me before my accident. We all take for granted being able to walk across a room, drive and do day-to-day activities. So I used to use hope in a simple and kind way, “Hope you have a great day,” “Hope it doesn’t rain today,” or “Hope everyone likes the meal I just prepared.”

When you go through a devastating accident and don’t know what you are going to face in the future, the word hope means something different. When you live with a disability, you look at things differently. When I pulled up to a store, I never used to think about whether or not I could make it to the door. Now I have to look where I am walking, monitor the surface and the people near me. Now I think, I hope I can get to the door, I hope I don’t slip, and, sadly enough, I hope people don’t stare at me and look at me differently than they used to.

door

“I hope I can get to the door, I hope I don’t slip, I hope people don’t stare.”

Hope has a new meaning now. I hope I can be the person I used to be and I hope that I do not let a disability stop me from being who I need to be.


Anything else you’d like to share with us?


I am excited to introduce BBQ to Devon! You will see how dedicated people are and how much people love meeting competitors and trying competition BBQ. When a charity like yours is involved, success means even more.


You can learn more about Sandy by contacting her via email. Don’t forget to buy your tickets for the Fire Up Hope BBQ Festival to taste real KCBS-sanctioned BBQ made possible by “the Porkanizer!”

Mobility Matters: The Surprising Benefits Of Good Balance

Balance guru Helena Esmonde is the most senior neurological therapist at Penn Therapy & Fitness in Radnor, Pa. As we explore why mobility matters in honor of Mobility Awareness Month, she explains how balance can significantly influence our quality of life.

Helena Esmonde HelpHOPELive

Senior neuro therapist Helena Esmonde


Tell us about yourself!


I am a senior therapist II, and I participate in mentoring, teaching and research in addition to quality clinical care. As a neurologic and vestibular (inner ear balance) specialist, my focus is to provide individualized rehabilitation using evidence-based practice to ensure the best possible function and quality of life for my patients.


Why is balance important?


Balance is essentially the ability to keep your center of mass over your base of support, which is your two feet. With a working balance system, we can stand safely, react effectively, avoid falling when engaging in a planned movement, and walk and move without stumbling or falling.

balance

Balance is the ability to keep your center of mass over your two feet

When our balance is impaired, we are more likely to fall and get injured. Falls are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries. Having the best balance possible minimizes the risks for serious and potentially life-altering injuries.


Which conditions can influence our balance?


Our balance can be impaired because of weakness, age, a neurological disease or injury, vision issues or decreased cognition. However, falling should not be seen as a normal part of aging or something that is inevitable. I often tell my patients, “Your auto-pilot for keeping your balance is not as automatic as you get older,” and that’s why patients train with us and learn how to move more safely.

fall

Falling should not be seen as a “normal” part of aging


How can poor balance affect your mind as well as your body?


There are a few different ways that balance can be emotionally and mentally distressing. When a person’s balance is impaired for any reason, that person lives in constant fear of injury and therefore tends to self-limit their activity. This can mean that they avoid exercise because of a fear of tripping on an uneven patch of sidewalk. That person then loses the mental and emotional benefits of regular exercise as well as the physical benefits.

isolate

Poor balance can invoke a fear of social environments

A person with poor balance often also chooses to avoid positive social experiences due to a fear of falling. For example, someone may not visit a friend because the friend does not have a railing next to their staircase, or they may not attend a party because of the fear of losing balance if someone bumps into them accidentally. Poor balance can lead to social isolation as well as physical deconditioning or disability.


How can physical therapy improve balance?


There are numerous advanced physical therapy techniques for training better balance, some of which are tailored to people with specific conditions. The focus of all such physical therapy is to key in on an individual patient’s goals. I am currently training an individual with MS who wants to be able to walk, dance and move safely at her daughter’s wedding in a month. Like most people with MS, she gets fatigued easily and finds that the fatigue negatively affects her balance. Another patient is trying to progress from using a walker to using a cane safely to free a hand for opening doors, carrying items and shaking someone’s hand in greeting. I try to focus on the goals that will bring quality to each unique person’s situation, whatever it may be.

balance

Could better balance improve your day-to-day interactions?


Can physical therapy be expensive?


Physical therapy is not as expensive as some other options, such as surgery, to correct balance issues. However, if a patient has a major injury or illness (including trauma, a stroke or a spinal cord injury) he or she will likely require therapy and rehabilitation for a longer time, including inpatient rehabilitation and home care, before “graduating” to an outpatient therapy setting. The numbers can add up.

wedding

“It’s hard to put a price on dancing at your daughter’s wedding”

Our main goal is helping patients get back to the highest level of functioning. It’s hard to put a price on dancing at your daughter’s wedding or shaking someone’s hand when you meet them. At Penn Therapy & Fitness, we offer a charitable care program for patients who are unable to afford their outpatient therapy. We also work with patients to help identify other resources that may help them afford care. This is one of the many reasons we appreciate partnerships with such wonderful organizations as HelpHOPELive!


Are there any ways to improve your balance at home?


Exercise is a critical element in decreasing your risk for balance issues and falls, but it’s important to understand what sort of exercise has the greatest benefit. Tai Chi, Pilates and yoga can improve balance, but for those who are not up for that level of challenge, strength in the hip muscles and core strength (belly and back muscle) are the most significant factors.

yoga

Try yoga to improve balance, or work on strengthening your body daily

Lie on your side and lift your top leg up and down. You’ll work important hip muscles that keep your pelvis stable for balance. In addition to exercise, have your vision checked at least yearly. Keep your mind sharp with crossword puzzles or other brain games that benefit your eyes and your brain! Taking action to prevent falls becomes more important as you age. Talk to your doctor and make sure you can keep your balance everywhere you want to go!


Need help covering the cost of rehabilitation to maintain your quality of life after a catastrophic injury or illness? Visit helphopelive.org to start a fundraising campaign with our nonprofit.