Tag Archives: recovery

What the Holiday Season Means to Me After a Spinal Cord Injury

In 2009, Kirk Williams was a motivated Colorado sociology graduate who filled his downtime with outdoor adventures and sports. In November of that year, a “complete freak accident, like trip-over-your-shoelaces kind of crash” changed his life: Kirk sustained a C5 spinal cord injury as he flew over the handlebars of his mountain bike. The injury left him paralyzed with a limited amount of feeling in his legs and limited use of his fingers.

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Kirk didn’t want his injury to put the brakes on his full and active lifestyle

As soon as he was able, Kirk began to immerse himself once again in outdoor adventures and sports. “My injury did influence my hobbies but I haven’t stopped doing what I love,” he explained. “I still do photography, camp, mountain bike [and] new hobbies like wheelchair rugby, scuba diving and hand cycling. I love travel and I was not reluctant at all to travel after my injury.”

Photo by SCI Recovery Project via Facebook.

Rehabilitation helped Kirk to reclaim his adventurous lifestyle, little by little. Source

Kirk is the founder, director and pilot/camera operator of the UAV-powered video production agency Birds Eye Optics. “It’s wild to think that while most people may think that since I’m in a wheelchair, my perspective is limited,” observed Kirk. “Actually, with my career, I see further than ever before.”

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“With my career, I see further than ever before.”

He credits fundraising and community support as essential parts of his journey. “My community of family and friends has been one of the most significant parts of me getting where I am today,” said Kirk. “Without the help of friends, family and HelpHOPELive, I wouldn’t have been able to afford the amazing equipment and lifestyle that I love to live. With my incredible support system, I’ve surpassed even my wildest dreams of what is possible.

I see each [injury] anniversary as a day to look back and see just how far I’ve progressed. I remind myself that anything is possible. I’ve taken the cards I’ve been dealt to not only survive but thrive in what first seemed nearly impossible circumstances.”

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On each injury anniversary, “I remind myself that anything is possible.”

Asked about the end of the year approaching, Kirk captured a sentiment shared by many of our clients, whether they are living with an injury or waiting for a transplant: the holidays are a time for hope, family and looking to the future. “The holidays are always a wonderful time of year,” explained Kirk. “I can catch up with friends and family and we can enjoy each other’s company. As crazy as they are, it’s always rewarding to have my entire family together in one place.”

The hustle and bustle of the season doesn’t appeal to Kirk, who said, “my favorite part of the holidays is being able to relax with the ones you love. It’s not about the busy times for me…it’s the downtime that I cherish the most. And the food!”

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What do the holidays mean to Kirk? Hope, family and looking to the future.

I usually make a New Year’s resolution,” said Kirk. “It’s a good chance for me to attack my goals with a refreshed set of eyes.”

His advice for others entering the holiday season and looking ahead to the new year? “Life is short, so why not try to experience it to the fullest? Get out there and try everything you can. You can be as happy or as upset about your injury and your life as you choose to be. It’s entirely up to you.

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Kirk says happiness after a spinal cord injury “is entirely up to you.”

What does hope mean to Kirk? “Hope means having my eyes set on what lays ahead, and knowing there is always a possibility for positivity given the right mindset.”

We know fundraising can make a significant impact on an individual’s life through the power of community, both financially and emotionally. As you continue to trust our nonprofit for a lifetime of medical fundraising support, we hope this holiday season brings you memorable times with friends and family and plenty of opportunities to look ahead, with hope.

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From our family to yours! Photo by Kirk.


Kirk Williams continues to fundraise with HelpHOPELive for the lifetime out-of-pocket medical and related expenses associated with his injury.

Bella Da Dawg is Kirk’s four-legged companion. She “spends most of her days dreaming of tennis balls” and “screwing up sound from her habitual snoring and striking good looks.”

5 Unforgettable Facts About Diving And Spinal Cord Injuries

“The only safe dive is the one you never take,” claimed an infographic from Shepherd Center. Is it true that diving puts you at risk? How serious is the connection between diving and spinal cord injuries?

July is the number one month for diving injuries by a wide margin. Here are 5 facts you need to know to keep yourself and your loved ones safe.


Fact 1: Diving is the fourth leading cause of paralyzing spinal cord injuries.


According to Shepherd Center, diving makes the list of the top five causes of spinal cord injuries with paralysis. 89% of individuals who get hurt diving are male and 11% are female. Most individuals who are injured are between 20 and 29 years old.

Shepherd Hospital SCI Dive Accidents Poster


Fact 2: There are multiple ways to sustain an injury while diving.


There are multiple ways for a dive to end in injury or paralysis based on the location and structure of the spinal cord. The severity of disability depends on the level of the spinal cord where the damage occurs.

The vertebrae of the spine, separated by intervertebral fibrous discs, protects the nervous system’s spinal cord. It is possible to damage the spinal cord by injuring the vertebrae and discs or by injuring the spinal cord itself. “Severe damage to the cord and nerves emerging from the vertebral column will cause paralysis,” reported WHO.

Neck Injury Under Wave rotational Neck Injury Under Wave Verticle Compression & Hyperflexion

A user forum on Apparelyzed highlighted some of the many ways that diving can lead to a life-altering injury:

“My husband dove into a pool on Labor Day weekend. He is a C4.”

“My spouse dove into a sponge pit. He is now a C5/6.”

“[To me] dives must include anything headfirst, whether it be into lakes, swimming pools, the sea, trampolines or bouncy castles.”

“I made a conscious though foolish decision to launch myself from my patio roof into an above ground pool ten feet away. It was a calculated risk that turned ugly. C5/6 anterior incomplete, with all the bells and whistles.”

“I dove into a surfboard. C7 complete.”

Dumped on the seabed by a huge wave…C4/5 complete.”

“When you swim competitively, you dive into the pool at the shallow end from a racing block. I was goofing around and dove too deep and hit the bottom.”

“I dove off a 70-foot-high cliff and was fine. Then I dove into a shallow area (of water) from about 6 to 7 feet and hit the sand on the bottom, fracturing my spine at C5/6.”


Fact 3: Water can be deceptive, even if you are a good judge of depth.


Many individuals who sustained a spinal cord injury from diving echo the same lament: “I thought I had good perception skills. I thought I could trust myself to stay safe.” The truth is that water often appears to be deeper than it is, which can lead to devastating errors of judgment even for experienced swimmers and divers.

HelpHOPELive diving safety

Even experienced swimmers can misjudge depth

“The physics of what happens is unforgiving, as a diver can enter the water at 15 feet per second. Most of these accidents occur in water that is less than 3 feet deep,” explained Dr. Robert Bohinski in a PSA from Mayfield Clinic. “These accidents [are] completely preventable.


Fact 4: A single dive can alter your life forever.  


In 2014, Dillon Connolly was swimming with friends when he performed a simple dive from one area of the water to another. Storms had created a sandbar beneath the water, and the impact shattered Dillon’s C5-C7 vertebrae. What followed was “the longest year of Dillon’s life,” explained girlfriend Kerry Sheridan. “Immediate surgery, nearly a month of intensive care, three months of intensive physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and lifestyle adaptations.”

Dillon Connolly HelpHOPELive

Dillon shattered his C5-C7 vertebrae while diving

Dillon explained that being an experienced swimmer isn’t enough to protect you from a dive that can severely alter the rest of your life. “I swam my entire life competitively,” he explained. “It even paid for college. I broke my neck diving into a wave where the sandy bottom went from deep to too shallow. I tell everyone I meet who asks what happened to never dive unless you can see the bottom, and to tell their kids and friends, too.”

Dillon Connolly HelpHOPELive

Dillon with his girlfriend, Kerry, and dog, Reef


Cole Sydnor was 16 when a diving accident left him paralyzed from the chest down. “The average person may not understand the extent to which our injuries affect us ‘behind the scenes,” Cole explained in an interview. “Most people…are never exposed to what it takes for [us] to shower, dress, use the restroom, etc. Those are the hardest parts about living with a spinal cord injury.”

Cole Sydnor HelpHOPELive

Cole was 16 when he became paralyzed from the chest down

To add to the physical and emotional challenges, spinal cord injuries can come along with a host of pricey out-of-pocket expenses. “Any medical expenses deemed unnecessary by insurance fall on my family and it becomes their responsibility to make those purchases,” Cole explained. “My elevator, room and bathroom renovation, and truck were all expenses that our community rallied to help fund.”

Cole Sydnor HelpHOPELive

Cole’s community “rallied to help fund” his out-of-pocket needs

Today, Cole and his family are vocal advocates for swimming and diving safety with the No What UR Divin’ N2 campaign. “I’ve been able to raise awareness about spinal cord injuries and spread a message about the importance of diving safety to youth in my community,” Cole said.

Cole Sydnor HelpHOPELive

Cole and his family are now diving safety advocates


Jeff Granger Harris broke his neck diving into the ocean in 2007. “He ran in to jump over a wave like me and him had done 20,000 times,” explained Jeff’s brother, Greg. Jeff hit his head “at the right angle, at the right speed, at the right tilt of the universe” and became paralyzed. “Anything you’re used to doing, you can’t do anymore in Jeff’s situation,” noted Greg.

Jeff Harris HelpHOPELive

Fundraising helps Jeff expand his mobility options

Jeff will face lifelong physical and financial challenges because of a split-second dive. “This is the only life that I have and I’m going to make the best of it. HelpHOPELive allows you some of that ability through fundraising,” he said. Fundraising has helped Jeff to bridge the gap between what insurance will cover and what he needs for a fulfilling and engaging life.

Jeff’s incredible story will be highlighted in an upcoming video from HelpHOPELive. Subscribe to our YouTube channel today and be among the first of our followers to see it!

Jeff Harris HelpHOPELive

A new video tells Jeff’s story


Lauren Shevchek had been swimming competitively for over a decade. At age 19, she dove into a pool and fractured three cervical vertebrae. She lost feeling from her chest downward.

Lauren Shevchek HelpHOPELive

Lauren was a competitive swimmer before her diving injury

Lauren worked through months of inpatient rehabilitation to regain some of her independence. She is beginning to recover some feeling beneath her injury site, though she mostly only experiences those sensations as pain. As her mother, Janice, explained, “We have learned to celebrate any sensation, including pain, as a sign that things are reconnecting.”

Lauren and her family speak publicly about the dangers of diving in order to reduce the number of diving-related injuries. Janice explained why she is a vocal advocate for diving safety. “Teens in particular are shocked when I mention that paralysis is not just about walking. It’s about losing your ability to urinate and move your bowels on your own,” Janice said. “Once they begin to understand, they will never forget how devastating the injury is.”

Lauren Shevchek HelpHOPELive

Lauren speaks publicly about the dangers of diving even as an experienced swimmer


Fact 5: You can make a difference.


You have a responsibility to keep yourself and your loved ones safe from preventable diving-related spinal cord injuries. Here are a few things you can do right now:

  1. Educate yourself about safe behaviors and share what you learn with your loved ones.
  2. Always swim with a lifeguard.
  3. Enter water feet first, even if you do not plan to dive.
  4. Don’t dive at all to maximize your chances of preventing injury and paralysis.
  5. Take the Feet First Pledge! Save and share the graphic below or share it via Facebook or Twitter.

HelpHOPELive

“Have the conversations,” urged Janice Shevchek. “Share Lauren’s slogan with kids: ‘If you can’t see through it, don’t dive into it.‘ Never dive headfirst into water you can’t see through, no matter how experienced you are. And don’t ever act on a dare or try risky stunts. The consequences just aren’t worth it.

Mobility Matters: The Surprising Benefits Of Good Balance

Balance guru Helena Esmonde is the most senior neurological therapist at Penn Therapy & Fitness in Radnor, Pa. As we explore why mobility matters in honor of Mobility Awareness Month, she explains how balance can significantly influence our quality of life.

Helena Esmonde HelpHOPELive

Senior neuro therapist Helena Esmonde


Tell us about yourself!


I am a senior therapist II, and I participate in mentoring, teaching and research in addition to quality clinical care. As a neurologic and vestibular (inner ear balance) specialist, my focus is to provide individualized rehabilitation using evidence-based practice to ensure the best possible function and quality of life for my patients.


Why is balance important?


Balance is essentially the ability to keep your center of mass over your base of support, which is your two feet. With a working balance system, we can stand safely, react effectively, avoid falling when engaging in a planned movement, and walk and move without stumbling or falling.

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Balance is the ability to keep your center of mass over your two feet

When our balance is impaired, we are more likely to fall and get injured. Falls are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries. Having the best balance possible minimizes the risks for serious and potentially life-altering injuries.


Which conditions can influence our balance?


Our balance can be impaired because of weakness, age, a neurological disease or injury, vision issues or decreased cognition. However, falling should not be seen as a normal part of aging or something that is inevitable. I often tell my patients, “Your auto-pilot for keeping your balance is not as automatic as you get older,” and that’s why patients train with us and learn how to move more safely.

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Falling should not be seen as a “normal” part of aging


How can poor balance affect your mind as well as your body?


There are a few different ways that balance can be emotionally and mentally distressing. When a person’s balance is impaired for any reason, that person lives in constant fear of injury and therefore tends to self-limit their activity. This can mean that they avoid exercise because of a fear of tripping on an uneven patch of sidewalk. That person then loses the mental and emotional benefits of regular exercise as well as the physical benefits.

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Poor balance can invoke a fear of social environments

A person with poor balance often also chooses to avoid positive social experiences due to a fear of falling. For example, someone may not visit a friend because the friend does not have a railing next to their staircase, or they may not attend a party because of the fear of losing balance if someone bumps into them accidentally. Poor balance can lead to social isolation as well as physical deconditioning or disability.


How can physical therapy improve balance?


There are numerous advanced physical therapy techniques for training better balance, some of which are tailored to people with specific conditions. The focus of all such physical therapy is to key in on an individual patient’s goals. I am currently training an individual with MS who wants to be able to walk, dance and move safely at her daughter’s wedding in a month. Like most people with MS, she gets fatigued easily and finds that the fatigue negatively affects her balance. Another patient is trying to progress from using a walker to using a cane safely to free a hand for opening doors, carrying items and shaking someone’s hand in greeting. I try to focus on the goals that will bring quality to each unique person’s situation, whatever it may be.

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Could better balance improve your day-to-day interactions?


Can physical therapy be expensive?


Physical therapy is not as expensive as some other options, such as surgery, to correct balance issues. However, if a patient has a major injury or illness (including trauma, a stroke or a spinal cord injury) he or she will likely require therapy and rehabilitation for a longer time, including inpatient rehabilitation and home care, before “graduating” to an outpatient therapy setting. The numbers can add up.

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“It’s hard to put a price on dancing at your daughter’s wedding”

Our main goal is helping patients get back to the highest level of functioning. It’s hard to put a price on dancing at your daughter’s wedding or shaking someone’s hand when you meet them. At Penn Therapy & Fitness, we offer a charitable care program for patients who are unable to afford their outpatient therapy. We also work with patients to help identify other resources that may help them afford care. This is one of the many reasons we appreciate partnerships with such wonderful organizations as HelpHOPELive!


Are there any ways to improve your balance at home?


Exercise is a critical element in decreasing your risk for balance issues and falls, but it’s important to understand what sort of exercise has the greatest benefit. Tai Chi, Pilates and yoga can improve balance, but for those who are not up for that level of challenge, strength in the hip muscles and core strength (belly and back muscle) are the most significant factors.

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Try yoga to improve balance, or work on strengthening your body daily

Lie on your side and lift your top leg up and down. You’ll work important hip muscles that keep your pelvis stable for balance. In addition to exercise, have your vision checked at least yearly. Keep your mind sharp with crossword puzzles or other brain games that benefit your eyes and your brain! Taking action to prevent falls becomes more important as you age. Talk to your doctor and make sure you can keep your balance everywhere you want to go!


Need help covering the cost of rehabilitation to maintain your quality of life after a catastrophic injury or illness? Visit helphopelive.org to start a fundraising campaign with our nonprofit.

HelpHOPELive Clients In The News March 2016

Spring is a season of hope, renewal and rebirth. For these three clients, spring represents a chance to enjoy a healthier, happier future with help from community fundraising.


Scott Truran: Veteran Sets Sights On Treatment For Debilitating MS


Thirty-nine-year-old Scott Truran was diagnosed with a progressive form of multiple sclerosis in 2011. Before the diagnosis, the former Marine was very active and prioritized staying in shape. Today, he has to rely on a cane to walk and his right side feels like it’s been “dipped in concrete,” he explained.

Scott Truran HelpHOPELive veteran MS

Scott will continue to lose mobility as his MS progresses

Scott will continue to lose mobility as his MS progresses. It’s likely he will eventually need a wheelchair to get around. Scott and his family learned about a treatment option for MS that may help to limit Scott’s mobility losses. The treatment involves wiping out his immune system with low-dose chemotherapy, then using stem cells, previously harvested from his blood, to rebuild a new immune system. This treatment option is only available as a clinical trial in the United States. Scott and his family will need to raise $80,000 to receive the treatment in Mexico as well as additional funds to offset the out-of-pocket costs of travel and temporary relocation for Scott and a caregiver.

Scott Truran HelpHOPELive veteran MS

Scott is appealing to his community for support for his treatment goals

“The money is the biggest obstacle,” Scott explained, “but it’s a small price to pay for a chance to slow [the] disease or stop it entirely.” Scott will fundraise with HelpHOPELive to maximize his chances of securing the funds he needs to potentially halt or reverse the progression of his MS. (Veteran’s family asking for help with progressive form of multiple sclerosis)


Theo St. Francis: Young Man With Spinal Cord Injury Plans “His Comeback”


In 2013 while taking part in a pre-orientation at MIT, Theo broke his C6 vertebra in a diving accident. Theo became paralyzed from the chest down with some shoulder and arm movement and limited finger dexterity. Doctors told Theo he would likely never walk again.

Theo St. Francis HelpHOPELive

“I am done managing. I am overcoming.”

As the Sonoma Index-Tribune reported, Theo “set his brilliant mind toward devising a plan for his comeback.” In December 2015, Theo reached a major milestone when he was able to sit on a barstool during a celebration with friends. He tries to spend time away from his manual wheelchair, pursuing activities that “align with what my goals are,” from driving an adaptive car to biking, skiing, surfing, kayaking and traveling.

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Fundraising with HelpHOPELive is allowing Theo to pursue the intensive spinal cord injury therapies he credits with helping him improve his mobility over time. Theo emphasizes the word “recovery” and spends his days looking forward. “I put the impossible in quotes,” he explained. “I am done managing. I am overcoming.” (Theo St. Francis overcoming odds to regain mobility)


Michael Mahan: Community Supports Man Facing Intestine Transplant


In 2012, what Michael Mahan and his family believed to be an upset stomach turned out to be a dangerously twisted small intestine. Since doctors removed the failing organ, every 6-8 weeks, Michael ends up back in the hospital with septic blood. With no small intestine to help his body process food, the husband and father of three relies entirely on intravenous nutrition as he waits for an intestine transplant.

Michael’s priority today is raising funds to cover the out-of-pocket expenses associated with an intestine transplant and follow-up care. He may need to spend up to 10 months in a transplant center after the procedure, and the cost must be paid up front before he can be put on the transplant waiting list.

Michael Mahan HelpHOPELive

Michael is a husband and father of three

Fundraising with HelpHOPELive is helping Michael to secure the funds he needs to get the transplant, but it’s also connecting his family with their supportive community. “We’re just so excited to do everything we can to help him out,” said local resident Jon Rosenlund. “He is a wonderful man and a great father. It’s an honor to help him, but we need a lot of help.” (Fundraiser to benefit man awaiting intestinal transplant)


Get your campaign in the news! If you need help with press releases and media outreach, contact your HelpHOPELive Fundraising Coordinator today.

Voices of Hope: Celebrating Black History Month

February is Black History Month, an opportunity to delve into the unique challenges and triumphs experienced by African-Americans. Here are two client perspectives on coping with discrimination, holding onto hope and serving as a self-advocate for your health.


David A. Jeffers

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David (above, with his wife Yasmine and sons) became paralyzed while at the beach with his family in August 2011. His family began fundraising with HelpHOPELive a month later.


Have you personally experienced or witnessed discrimination?

I’ve experienced discrimination both as a result of being black and as a result of being disabled. I have been treated as uneducated and unintelligent. People often choose to talk to my wife instead of me and ignore me, even when I address them directly. Little do they know that the black guy in the wheelchair is an active father, husband and mechanical engineer who graduated with the third highest GPA in my major.


How have you served as your own advocate?

Honestly, I’ve had to fight for almost every service I’ve used and the assistance I’ve received, including public transportation, rehabilitation and making sure neighborhood amenities are accessible. I document my experiences on my blog. I would advise others who face a similar struggle not to take ‘No’ for an answer. You must be persistent. For several issues I encountered, it took months to find a resolution.


What does Black History Month mean to you?

I wish we didn’t need to have Black History Month. I wish the history books and school curriculums could reflect events as they happened with a reverence for all cultures, but until that happens, it will remain an important month to me and my family.


What do you associate with the word ‘hope’?

A catastrophic injury like mine is truly life-changing. I could have died. As a quad, your whole approach to life has to change. You gain a totally new perspective on life. Hope gives me the ability to survive and thrive. Without hope, me and my family would not be as healthy or happy as we are today. My wife and kids are my main motivation and they help me find hope.


David is currently fundraising for Lokomat training ($85 per hour) and exercise therapy ($35 per hour) to improve his mobility. He has noticed a drop in strength and energy level since he stopped therapy in June of 2015 due to financial constraints.


Alison Jones

Alison Jones and son Alerique Dariso

Alison (above, with son Alerique Dariso) was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) when she was seventeen. She is seeking a living kidney donor so she can receive a life-changing transplant. Alison and her son started fundraising with HelpHOPELive in June 2015.


Have you personally experienced or witnessed discrimination?

I have had to seek numerous medical opinions to get treatment. Organ transplantation was never included in potential treatment options as my kidney function declined. I had to initiate the conversation myself. After speaking with other African-Americans, the majority knew people who were on dialysis or had died on dialysis, but only a small percentage knew someone who had received a transplant. In comparison, when I speak with non-minorities, I often hear, “A friend of mine had a kidney transplant. You are going to be just fine.”

The most painful racism I have experienced: one Valentine’s Day while my son was enrolled in a private preschool, he drew a picture of his “valentine,” who had blonde hair. His teacher pulled him aside and told him he couldn’t have a blonde valentine. That incident shaped my parenting and I began to prepare my son for discrimination and teach him that no one can limit his choices in life.


Any advice for other people who are facing the challenges of PKD?

For anyone living with chronic kidney disease or PKD, I strongly suggest participating in a support group. My greatest life strategies have evolved during support group meetings. Speaking with others who are experiencing similar health experiences is therapeutic and helps you to avoid depression.


What does Black History Month mean to you?

Black History Month is a reminder that generations of people have overcome insurmountable obstacles through diligence and continuous effort. Black History Month reminds me that giving up is not an option.

African-Americans make up a minority within the general population, yet we face higher rates of hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and obesity. All of these conditions can lead to kidney failure. One of the reasons I am looking forward to receiving a kidney transplant is so I can teach and advocate for early kidney function testing and proactive health behaviors to change current health trends.


What do you associate with the word ‘hope’?

I am so thankful to all of my loved ones who have supported me during this journey. To me, hope is another day of breath and opportunity. Every time God gives me another breath, I want to make it count, and that is living hope. After my life, hope will be there for more generations to strive to reach their highest level of potential and opportunity.


Alison is fundraising for uncovered costs associated with her kidney transplant preparations, including the cost of a lifetime of post-transplant anti-rejection medications.

How Your Donation Will Support Our Nonprofit Mission

In addition to helping us to provide emergency assistance grants, your contribution will help fuel our mission to support community-based fundraising for people with unmet medical and related expenses due to cell and organ transplants or catastrophic injuries and illnesses. Learn why that matters so much to families across the country.

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How HelpHOPELive Serves Families


Roughly 20% of families who have health insurance still struggle to cover their medical expenses. We understand that a medical crisis can create a severe emotional, physical and financial burden for any family. Community support, where relatives, friends, neighbors and co-workers get involved in fundraising efforts, is often a vital untapped resource that can help people pay for uncovered medical expenses.

When a family chooses to fundraise with HelpHOPELive, they benefit from:

  • An online Campaign Page where they can ask friends and family for life-changing donations and receive messages of support
  • One-on-one consultation from one of our expert Fundraising Coordinators to help them develop a personalized campaign that is tailored to the needs and interests of the patient and their support network.
  • Custom fundraising materials like event flyers, awareness materials and press releases
  • The opportunity to earn Challenge Grants by reaching fundraising milestones
  • Our nonprofit status: fundraising support that does not jeopardize their medical coverage status (Medicaid, SSI)and the opportunity for their community members to make tax deductible contributions
  • Expert fundraising advice backed by more than 30 years of experience building successful campaigns

For many clients struggling with life-changing conditions, we are more than just a fundraising resource: we are a lifeline set apart by our compassion and expertise. In fact, in a 2014 survey, 92% of respondents rated our customer service as Excellent, Very Good or Good and 91% said they would recommend HelpHOPELive to another family or had already done so.


What Clients Say About Us


“We have had numerous experiences with nonprofit organizations and HelpHOPELive has been the best we have ever worked with. Compassionate, always ready to support and help, they have been rock steady in their devotion to those in need.”

The name HelpHOPELive says it all.”

“HelpHOPELive is a huge relief to me during a very stressful time.”

If it were not for HelpHOPELive, my son would never have received his transplant.

“Tangible financial support has helped immensely, by lifting a burden that would otherwise be hovering and weighing over us”

Many families would not be able to cover their vital medical expenses without fundraising. Your donations will help us to continue providing key fundraising support to families that depend on it.


We Still Need Your Help To Spread Hope!


We rely on contributors like you to help us continue serving families coping with the financial burden of uncovered medical expenses. Find out how you can keep hope alive for these families with your donation and support.

Coming Home For The Holidays

At HelpHOPELive, the holidays have always represented a few key things to us, including community, hope and home. For many families, the holiday season represents new beginnings or the conclusion of one journey as a new adventure or challenge begins. That’s why we were so pleased to find the uplifting artwork created by Thomas Swanston, artist and husband of paralyzed artist Gail Foster.

Artists Gail Foster and Thomas Swanston

Artists Gail Foster and Thomas Swanston

Tom’s work is inspired and informed by his perception of home and healing. “For me and my wife, the holidays are a hectic time that have often included hospitals, “ said Tom. “Gail has come a long way, so our holiday will be filled with more gratitude than ever before.” Tom frequently touches on the theme of migration in his work. As he described it, “”Migrations remind us of nature’s ability to renew and revive itself… Such is also the human life.” Here are a few more of Tom’s reflections on that physical and emotional journey:

“Migration speaks to the mystic movement through space and time, from one location to another and the ultimate return home.”

Thomas Swanston

“The recurring patterns…remind us of nature’s ability to renew and revive itself, rhythmically changing, yet remaining stable and consistent through the seasons.”

Thomas Swanston

“Like migratory birds, physical and spiritual travelers alike explore new or familiar places, always to return to the one special locale they call ‘home.’”

Thomas Swanston

“All journeys have a purpose and an end, no matter how long they might be or how far away from home they may take us. We don’t just hope something will happen, we put one foot in front of the other every day.”

Thomas Swanston

Tom has graciously allowed HelpHOPELive to incorporate his artwork into our limited edition holiday card for our most loyal and generous donors who represent the Kolff Society. “Working with HelpHOPELive has provided us with the opportunity to raise funds for Gail’s personal care, insurance premiums, uncovered medications and a whole host of other expenses related to her health that have, up until now, been beyond our capabilities,” said Tom. “I always like to contribute to worthy causes and HelpHOPELive certainly fits that bill.”


For Tom and Gail, art is a way of life. The two own StudioSwan in Atlanta, a gallery that showcases their vast range of artistic talents.