Tag Archives: spinal cord injury cost

7 Myths About Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation

Families coping with a spinal cord injury have so many factors to consider, from immediate medical support to long-term care and financial planning. In the final installment of our series, Amy Bratta gives us 7 common misconceptions about spinal cord injury rehabilitation.

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Myth 1: Cost isn’t a factor after a spinal cord injury.


In most cases, injured individuals will need wheelchairs, lift systems, ramps and bathroom equipment before continuing to recover at home – and those are just the basics. Access to these resources is significantly impacted by insurance and a patient’s individual financial circumstances.


Myth 2: Young adults find it easier to deal with spinal cord injuries.


When it comes to spinal cord injuries, every individual is unique. Rehabilitation depends on social support, how the injury happened and a host of other variables. Age is not necessarily the leading factor that differentiates one patient’s experience following a spinal cord injury from another’s.

At Magee, we try to meet young adults where they are in terms of coping with their injury. We hold adolescent or young adult support groups. We’ve developed a young adult suite with tutoring, computer access, gaming, large-screen TVs and other comforts that provides a space where recovering young adults can spend their time. Specialty age-related counselors and coordinators are on staff to help adolescents return to school and work, or to pursue educational opportunities once back in the community or online.


Myth 3: Spinal cord injury rehabilitation ends once you leave the hospital.


When a person is admitted to inpatient rehabilitation, he or she is evaluated by a team of clinicians. Together, the person and team set goals and a plan to reach the goals. These goals stretch well beyond the initial inpatient hospitalization. We help patients and families create a therapy plan for what they can do now, with the movement they have, but we also help them to develop a long-term plan of care for when they leave the inpatient rehab environment. The end of inpatient therapy is not the end of spinal cord injury recovery! People can continue to participate in therapy at home or in outpatient depending on the circumstances.


Myth 4: Spinal cord injuries stay the same throughout an individual’s lifetime.


As an individual with a SCI ages, he or she will face new and different challenges or complications. In addition to the normal effects of aging that we all face, SCI-related complications may present themselves years after the injury itself. You may gain weight, increase or decrease your level of strength, or experience changes in your skin’s strength. Sometimes, these factors can be managed or minimized with foresight. But in other cases, internal developments may be out of your control. That’s why it’s essential to have a knowledgeable and dependable team to supervise your long-term health and rehabilitation.


Myth 5: Families can’t do much to support spinal cord injury rehabilitation.


Social support is a critical component. Our multidisciplinary team members are part of that support system. We encourage families to be actively involved in their loved one’s inpatient hospital stay as soon and as often as they can, as they will play a critical role in supporting the next phases of rehabilitation once their loved one is back in the community and out of the hospital.


Myth 6: Physical therapists can easily predict how each patient will progress.


I wish we had a crystal ball and could predict the future. We try to help patients understand what we see as their current potential and what we know might be possible based on the level of their injury. There is always room for hope. With spinal cord injuries, it’s never black and white. We tell patients, this is what we can see and anticipate right now. If those circumstances change, it’s time to reevaluate.


Myth 7: A positive attitude has little influence on how patients deal with rehabilitation.


A positive attitude makes a significant difference in helping someone to achieve the highest level of independence possible. This may sometimes mean a full recovery of physical function; other times it may mean using technology and equipment to lead an active and independent lifestyle. Mental toughness and motivation are keys to success in both of these scenarios.


Our myth buster is Amy Bratta, the spinal cord injury Therapy Manager at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital in Philadelphia.

An Inside Look At Spinal Cord Injury Physical Therapy

About 12,500 people will experience a spinal cord injury this year. How will physical therapy impact their lives? Amy Bratta, the spinal cord injury therapy manager at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital in Philadelphia, answers our questions about SCI rehabilitation.

Amy Bratta Magee spinal cord injury physical therapy sci rehabilitation philly philadelphia


What sort of social support is provided to individuals who pursue inpatient physical therapy?

Here at Magee Rehabilitation, we collaborate on a multidisciplinary team that includes clinical neuropsychologists and an extensive peer support program for patients and families with individual and group options.


What technologies are available to promote independence for people with spinal cord injuries?

We try to give people opportunities to try equipment that will enable them to be more independent in their homes and communities. We have an amazing “Smartroom” that shows some of this new technology. Identifying the best technology tools to promote independence depends on understanding an individual’s mobility level and the funding that he or she has access to in order to continue using the tools at home.

HelpHOPELive: We’ll be taking a closer look at some of these cutting-edge modalities in a future Blog post. Stay tuned!


Which spinal cord injury support initiatives are you most excited about?

We’ve started a pilot SCI “medical home” program for injured individuals. There are similar models for people with chronic diseases, but very few available for people with spinal cord injuries. It’s an attempt to follow people closely after they leave inpatient rehabilitation and transition back to the community. The medical home multidisciplinary team provides proactive support and services to minimize medical complications and promote optimal health after a spinal cord injury.

Spinal cord injury therapy is a fast-moving space in which professionals try to seek answers and tailor technological developments to individual needs. Stem cell research and other medical developments continue to give people hope that in the future we will have more answers than we have now.

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What is essential to success as a spinal cord injury physical therapist?

Collaboration is essential. We work closely on a multidisciplinary team to provide well-informed and complete support. We typically look for new team members who are self-motivated, willing to learn and invested in teamwork. There is a physical component to our work, but it is also very emotional. Working with individuals and their families after a traumatic injury can be an intense and rewarding experience.


What have you learned from the injured individuals you’ve worked with?

With each person that I’ve worked with, what stands out to me is the strength of the human spirit. A person going through trauma can and will deal with the outcome and move forward to the best of his or her ability. That applies to social and emotional transitioning as well as physical rehabilitation. Sometimes I truly feel that I’ve learned more from some of our patients than they have learned from me!

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When Penn State quarterback Adam Taliaferro was injured in 2000, he had surgery, followed by 7 months of in- and outpatient services at Magee. What was it like working with Adam?

Adam is an extraordinary young man who came in with very little active movement initially. He was always very present, highly motivated, mentally tough and positive, and he carried that attitude not only into his own care and therapy but into the lives of others who were struggling with similar injuries. That’s the beauty of being here: people going through similar experiences can be there for each other. Adam is an exceptional example of giving back while pursuing personal rehabilitation.


What’s your favorite part of your job?

I like that my job is very dynamic. Every day is a little bit different. You have to adapt, even if you think you have a plan! I meet some incredible people. You walk in the door and see what other people are dealing with, and suddenly your problems or issues seem completely insignificant by comparison.

My work inspires me and gives me perspective. I appreciate the opportunity to serve people who have been through trauma and injury. Every day when I come to work, I feel like I still have a role in helping people to receive the best care they possibly can. It can be a very emotional job – but for us, working in this field means entering a very special place where we can make a significant and lasting impact on an individual’s life.

Amy Bratta spinal cord injury sci physical therapy rehabilitation Magee Philadelphia


We appreciate your time, Amy! Visit the Magee Rehabilitation Hospital website to learn more about Amy Bratta’s work.

 

Best-Ever Advice After A Spinal Cord Injury

We asked four HelpHOPELive clients to answer a single question.The result is a series of powerful insights for anyone who is struggling to keep moving forward after a debilitating injury.


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1

“The journey gets easier over time. The first few years are the hardest post-injury, when you are trying to adjust to your body’s physical changes and all that comes with those changes.

If you’re interested in adaptive hobbies and athletics, a good way to start is to search for adaptive sports programs in your area. If there is a specific hobby you’re interested in, search for meet-ups or local clubs for that hobby. Talk to others who have your condition and are already doing the things you would like to be doing.

There are so many resources for support and information, and they are all at your fingertips. You can use social networks like Facebook to find and network with others who have spinal cord injuries.”

Robert


2

“Do the best with what you have and take control of your own care. Follow research in spinal cord injury therapy and stay involved.

Do not give up on recovering functionality and making gains through hard work. Keep your body in shape and ready for the treatments that will come – I hope that they arrive sooner rather than later.”

Brian


 

4

“Don’t give up. Our bodies want to heal if we will let them. Keep moving as much as possible and know that it will get easier and your body will get stronger.”

Rachael


3

“Get out there and try anything and everything you can. Today there are so many options when it comes to adaptive sports and activities, with new ones being invested every day.

There is no excuse not to try to search for something that you will love to do.

Don’t be scared just because someone with a similar disability can’t or doesn’t do something. You can be as happy or as upset about your injury and your life as you choose to be. It’s entirely up to you.”

Kirk


What’s your best piece of advice for someone who has recently sustained a spinal cord injury? Share it with us on Facebook or on Twitter.

 

Ask A Professional: Spinal Cord Injury Treatments

Roughly 12,500 people are diagnosed with a spinal cord injury every year. Dr. Mark Eskander, a spine surgeon at Delaware Orthopaedic Specialists, offered insights on what spinal cord injury survivors can expect when they explore modern treatment options.

Dr. Mark Eskander

I heard about a breakthrough treatment. Will it heal my spinal cord injury?

Technology in this industry is evolving constantly, but not all of the ‘groundbreaking’ treatments featured in popular news will apply to spinal cord injury patients with permanent damage. Mainstream media is not always in touch with medical reality. However, there is incredible research being conducted right now in this space.

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Are new treatments being researched?

Aggressive cooling may help to reduce secondary acute injuries, but this path is a distant consideration. Stem cells may one day provide an avenue for spinal regeneration. There is also extensive research into advanced prosthesis technology that may provide a return to functionality.

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Where can I find credible spinal cord injury information?

The American Spinal Injury Association is one of the most well-known organizations serving this patient population. Spinal cord injury groups are a great source for news and support.

How do I begin the SCI treatment process?

New procedures are not the right fit for everyone, so a frank discussion is a vital part of the process. Approach someone who you can trust on your care team, whether it’s a physical therapist or a spinal surgeon. Do your own research online to supplement the process. Some of my patients will discuss and share their personal experiences with others to illuminate their treatment options; that kind of personal connection can supplement your decision-making process.

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I have had a lot of treatment setbacks. Should I give up?

Treatment and rehabilitation options have extremely positive outcomes for many. Improvement is always possible. Though the early diagnosis phase can be very laborious, it’s in your best interest to stay focused and positive with the help of your team.

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How do I know if surgery is right for my injury?

Depending on your response to treatments like injection or physical therapy, your care team will choose whether or not to explore other options. If you’re not a candidate for newer procedures, you don’t need to lose hope: many different procedures, old and new, have their own merits for individual patient needs.

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How can I mentally prepare for spinal surgery?

Always have realistic goals and expectations for surgery. Expecting to turn into your former self again is a classic setup for failure. Even if you are looking at improvement in the 80 to 90 percent range, you need to remain realistic. You can be dissatisfied if you go in to a treatment expecting a full recovery.

What does the recovery process look like after spinal cord injury surgery?

Spinal cord injury surgery comes with an intensive follow-up and care team collaboration process. You’re looking at ICU stays, possibly multiple surgeries, rehabilitation, specialized spinal cord injury physical therapy, home care with therapists, medical devices to manage day-to-day and, potentially, new devices to accommodate mobility needs.

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Will these treatments be expensive?

Treatment can be a huge cost burden for spinal cord injury patients. Therapies and experimental trials can be both expensive and time-consuming. However, just because there’s a cost burden does not mean that treatment is not worth it.

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Will I be able to live a happy life post-injury?

Spinal cord injury patients can live happy and meaningful lives post-injury, without a doubt. These patients have been some of the nicest and most outspoken community members I’ve met in my practice. Modern technology and mobility equipment can improve quality of life and family ties can remain strong after injury.

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What do you tell your patients when they prepare for treatment?

A positive mindset is huge. Have hope and get the resources to make it happen. Adjust your expectations for what you can and cannot hope to achieve, but face these realities early on, then start focusing on the positives.

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To learn more about Dr. Mark Eskander, visit his website. If you’re struggling to afford spinal cord injury treatment, learn more about your HelpHOPELive fundraising options.