Tag Archives: support group

Has Fundraising Helped You? You Can Pay It Forward!

Has fundraising had a positive impact on your life? You have an opportunity to give back to your community and support other families facing a medical crisis. Last week, we featured Danielle Bailey, who has helped several local families kick-start their fundraising efforts with HelpHOPELive. This week, we feature five tried-and-true ways to start making a difference today.

pay it forward


…supporting families who are going through a similar situation.


You can help families navigate through the same challenges you’ve overcome. As heart transplant recipient Rick Brittell explains, “Before I got my heart, I was so tired of being away from home and isolated. Then my social worker reached out and asked if [my wife and I] would be willing to meet with a patient at the hospital who was facing a similar situation. We began to focus on supporting others. We started a support group in the local area that was open to lung and heart transplant candidates and recipients, caregivers and people who were grieving.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

You can be a vital source of support for another family.

Rick notes that this kind of support can make a tangible difference in someone’s life: “The doctors have said to us, ’You don’t know how much of a difference you have made.’ They even told us that people are being released 3-4 days earlier than average now that we are there to provide support!


…referring families to HelpHOPELive for nonprofit fundraising support.


Do you know someone who needs help fundraising for medical and related expenses? Help him or her understand how HelpHOPELive can help. Point other families in need to helphopelive.org for more information. If you would like additional resources to share with others who may need our help, contact us today.

Diane Maxwell, wife of transplant recipient Mark Maxwell, explains how she helped another family find us: “I met Jude Jamieson through a woman’s retreat, where I learned that she also had a husband with a chronic illness in need of a transplant. I encouraged her to contact HelpHOPELive and start a fundraising campaign since her husband’s transplant hospital required a $5,000 account balance at minimum to list a patient for transplant. They were able to raise the funds through the summer and fall. Her husband went into acute liver failure, but less than a week later, he had a new liver thanks to their fundraising efforts. All I did was be bold enough to suggest she contact HelpHOPELive. You guys did the rest, right on time.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Diane referred Kevin and family to HelpHOPELive for fundraising help


…supporting HelpHOPELive’s mission.


Every donation to our nonprofit helps families across the country receive tangible and compassionate fundraising support. You know firsthand how important that support can be when a medical crisis strikes. Become a monthly contributor to HelpHOPELive today and begin paying it forward to families who need our help to combat the high cost of medical and related care.

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Want to see the true impact of your gift? Keep up with stories of hope on our Blog and on our website, or get a handpicked selection of tips and stories in your inbox every month!


…using your next fundraiser to serve the community.


As Heidi Anderson, mother of 2-year-old transplant recipient Deanna, explains, “Deanna lived in the hospital for more than three months before her transplant. We were visited by many people during that time, including volunteers who would bring her toys and gifts. It truly touched my heart. I see so many children at the hospital now who really need a smile.” Heidi knew a fundraiser in honor of Deanna could provide a way to give back, so she “decided to collect toys for kids at the hospital through a toy drive as part of one of Deanna’s Valentine’s Day HelpHOPELive fundraisers.”

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The toy collection was a huge success, says Heidi: “So many people brought toys! It made me incredibly happy! We are still collecting today.


…donating in honor of a particular family.


After getting her own fundraising campaign rolling, LAM fighter and transplant candidate Nicole Seefeldt found a way to pay it forward. “I met Alyssa Mebs while I was getting my transplant evaluation,” says Nicole. “We just started talking one night and we became fast friends. Once I saw that Alyssa was fundraising for a transplant, I thought, what can I do to help her? I knew I was going to meet my first fundraising goal…so I donated what I had to give in her honor.”

HelpHOPELive Pay It Forward

Nicole, left, made a donation to HelpHOPELive in honor of Alyssa

Today, when Nicole asks for donations or donates to a fellow HelpHOPELive client, she keeps this advice in mind: “It’s not the dollar amount you give, it’s that you give at all. Not everybody has a lot of money, but since it’s tax-deductible, every penny is something that they can use that compounds the effect. I never want to put an amount that people have to give. I just encourage them to give what they can.”


You don’t have to have it all to give back.


As Heidi Anderson explains, “Giving back is something we should all consider. Whether you do it with a toy drive or something else, paying it forward is about giving love and kindness to others who need it most.”

Today, consider how you can give back to the community that has given you so much. If you have a great idea for giving back, contact us and we may feature your campaign in an upcoming Blog post!

4 Things You Need To Know About Your TBI

March 18 is Brain Injury Awareness Day. To honor TBI survivors and their daily struggle to find a ‘new normal,’ we’ve created this Guest Post with Huffington Post writer and TBI survivor Amy Zellmer. If you’ve experienced a TBI, here are four things you need to know right now, and four ways to find support.

Brain Injury Awareness Day HelpHOPELive

March 18 is Brain Injury Awareness Day.

One: It’s normal to feel angry, afraid or stressed out.

A TBI can spark a range of confusing emotions, from anxiety and apprehension to anger, helplessness and panic. Zellmer confirmed that after her TBI, she constantly felt afraid of sustaining a second injury and daunted at the prospect of managing her TBI symptoms for the rest of her life.

Some TBI sufferers encounter “a daily struggle even trying to get out of bed in the morning,” said Zellmer. “They are terrified of what might happen to them next. Some have such profound anxiety that they can hardly leave their home.” Zellmer cautioned that attitude shifts after a TBI can be severe. “My personality has changed,” she said, “and I am aware of my mood swings…sometimes the bad days are just more than I can handle.”

Find Support: Zellmer notes that the fear, anxiety and helplessness that you feel can be successfully managed and treated. Sticking to a routine, staying involved in the activities you enjoy, and accepting that your feelings are normal are helpful first steps.

For additional support, there is no shame in seeking professional help. “Seeing a therapist on a regular basis has really helped me deal with my PTSD issues and fear of hurting myself,” said Zellmer. “A therapist is not there to judge you or tell you you’re right or wrong. They are there to help you sort through your emotions and anxiety to relieve yourself of the negatives in your life.”

Anger HelpHOPELive Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness

It’s normal to feel angry, afraid or resentful post-TBI.

Two: Cognitive issues can catch you off guard.

There are multiple cognitive symptoms that might affect your daily life after a TBI. For Zellmer, cognitive issues following her TBI were both frustrating and disruptive. “We [as TBI survivors] have cognitive deficiencies that don’t make sense, even to us,” Zellmer noted. “The confused woman in the kitchen staring at the oven is someone I am just now starting to understand,” she said. “I am finally coming to terms with this ‘new me.’”

Find Support: According to Zellmer, the cognitive issues associated with your “invisible” injury can make you feel isolated, judged or misunderstood. “After my TBI, I felt isolated and alone,” said Zellmer. “No one really seemed to understand what I was going through, or possibly, they didn’t believe it was as severe as it was. When injuries and illnesses are invisible like TBI, it’s easy for others to say, ‘well, you look normal, so you must be okay.’”

Zellmer responded to this isolation with action: “I created a group on Facebook for survivors to hang out and feel like they fit in. Many were craving this sort of connection and community.”

Speaking with like-minded TBI survivors may significantly improve your mood and outlook. The connections may even help your brain to physically heal. “For me, personally,” said Zellmer, “once I began to understand that my symptoms were normal and fit the scale of what others were dealing with, it really started to help my healing and the grieving process as I let go of the ‘old me.’”

Brain Injury Awareness HelpHOPELive memory

A TBI can result in multiple cognitive symptoms, including memory lapses.

Three: Every TBI is different.

For some, a TBI comes with constant physical pain and overwhelming fatigue. For others, the injury is synonymous with constant confusion and debilitating memory impairment. Your TBI is as unique as you are, and your symptoms may be a one-of-a-kind blend of physical or mental challenges. Ultimately you are the only expert on your unique circumstances and struggles following a TBI.

Find Support: For Zellmer, finding an outlet for her emotions and thoughts was an important step in the recovery process. At first, said Zellmer, “I didn’t have the courage. I [was] scared…scared that people will be snarky or rude….scared of reliving the fall.” Zellmer realized that releasing her emotions would allow her to support other TBI survivors and conquer her own fears about her experiences. “Writing is your therapy, Amy,” she said to herself to combat the doubts.

“Finding your ‘new normal’ is an important part of recovery and healing,” said Zellmer. “Get out and get active or find a hobby.” Not all hobbies will bring you as much satisfaction as frustration: “Many of us can’t deal with computer screens or loud stimulation, so finding a new alternative can be challenging, but rewarding when you find it,” Zellmer said.

Brain Injury Awareness HelpHOPELive outlet

A positive outlet can help you come with your emotions post-TBI.

Four: TBIs are expensive to rehabilitate.

The average lifetime cost for a TBI averages $85,000 but expenses for a severe TBI can top $3 million. The recovery process may call for therapy, physical rehabilitation, extensive medical testing, medication, transportation to specialization centers and regular GP or hospital visits. Some costs, including temporary housing and transportation, may not be completely covered by all insurance plans.

Find Support: HelpHOPELive supports TBI patients in their recovery process by providing assistance with fundraising both online and in your community. If you are struggling with the costs associated with your TBI, learn about your options at m.helphopelive.org/supportforinjury.

Zellmer noted the importance of finding professionals who will give you the support and insight you need to recover. “Find a doctor who understands and ‘gets’ you and your TBI,” she recommended. “If you’re not happy with the one you’ve got, look for another, or ask for a referral from someone in your area.” Finding the right recovery team for you may be an ongoing process. “Be an advocate for your health!” Zellmer urged.

You don’t have to face your TBI alone.

Though every TBI is unique, you don’t have to struggle with the symptoms of your TBI without support. Zellmer releases regular blog posts on The Huffington Post for TBI survivors.

Brain Injury Awareness HelpHOPELive support

53 million U.S. citizens are living with a brain injury. You are not alone.

“Know that you are not alone,” said Zellmer. “There are approximately 53 million people in the U.S. living with a brain injury. There are many groups out there trying to help raise awareness. Get involved! Join support groups. Get active. Embrace your new life!”

Talk to us about your post-TBI journey on Facebook or on Twitter.