Tag Archives: wheelchair

Mobility Matters: Community Support Can Open Doors After Injury

As Mobility Awareness Month continues, we hear from Cole Sydnor, who was 16 when a diving accident left him paralyzed from the chest down. Today, almost five years after the accident, loved ones describe him as a fierce competitor, a compassionate friend and a community member dedicated to giving back.

Cole Sydnor HelpHOPELive

Cole coaches the Richmond Sportable Spokes wheelchair basketball team


Are mobility and independence important to you?


Mobility and independence are important no matter who you are. For me specifically, they are of the utmost importance, because a spinal cord injury can prohibit one from enjoying them freely. It has taken great effort to recover some semblance of the mobility and independence I once had. Now that I have, mobility and independence are allowing me to successfully navigate college and even hold a full-time internship away from home.


How has physical therapy impacted your life?


Without physical therapy, not only would I have an incomplete understanding of what I am capable of, I wouldn’t even have built up the strength to reach that potential.


What financial challenges has your family faced since the injury?


Financially, expenses were centered on making everything accessible. That began with adding an elevator to my house and converting my room and bathroom so they would be completely accessible—all three projects were very expensive. We also had to purchase a truck which could accommodate a specific (wheelchair) lift so that I’d be able to drive.

Cole Sydnor HelpHOPELive

The financial strain on Cole’s family was “significant” after injury

To this day, any medical expenses deemed unnecessary by insurance fall on my family, and it becomes their responsibility to make those purchases out of pocket. Expenses add up quickly. One current expense is outpatient physical therapy. On top of paying for college, the financial strain has been significant.


How did your community support you after you were injured?


At the time, I was certain that my life had been irreparably changed for the worse. Motivating myself was not enough to get my butt in gear, so I relied on friends and family to help me find that motivation to work towards recovery. I was able to lean on my loved ones whose encouragement was neverending. Without that presence constantly pushing me forward, it’s likely that I’d still be swallowed by despair, doing nothing and helping no one.

Expenses which go uncovered by insurance can rack up quickly. My elevator, room and bathroom renovation, and truck were all expenses that our community rallied to help fund. Without my community, we would have had no shot at those things and more.

Cole Syndor HelpHOPELive

Friends and family were a big source of support


Can you describe how it felt to go to college away from home?


Well, I was very nervous and apprehensive about going away to college. What comforted me was the proximity of campus to my home and the fact that my brother was going to be living with me. Like when I was first injured, I really relied on the encouragement and support of my friends and loved ones to make the leap to living on campus.

In hindsight, I was over-worried. The transition was surprisingly smooth, largely due to the very accommodating services of University of Richmond. They put in hard paths where they may have only been an off-road path, moved classes to the most accessible buildings, and placed me in a spacious room centrally located on campus.


What do you think the average person doesn’t realize about spinal cord injuries?


The average person may not understand the extent to which our injuries affect us “behind the scenes.” Most people only encounter people with spinal cord injuries when they are out in public but are never exposed to what it takes for them to shower, dress, use the restroom, etc. Those are the hardest parts about living with a spinal cord injury and unless someone makes an effort to understand, he or she may never realize it.


What are you most proud of?


I’ve been able to raise awareness about spinal cord injuries and spread a message about the importance of diving safety to youth in my community and beyond. A mother told me a story of how her son jumped off a river dock and broke his leg, not realizing that the water was very shallow. She was angry with him, but then he told her, “Mom, I didn’t dive. I remembered Cole’s story.”

Cole Sydnor

Cole is proud of his diving safety advocacy work


What are you looking forward to this year?


First and foremost, I’m looking forward to helping out with a fundraising event which will benefit a foundation that offers private scholarships for varsity or collegiate athletes who have been injured or become chronically ill. Next, I would say graduating from college. After that, if I could land a stable job in my field of interest, I would be stoked.

Most of all though, I look forward to the day that there is a cure for spinal cord injuries. My life would be transformed in an instant, the same way it was on the day I was injured. To me, the word “hope” means that one day I’ll walk again.


Do you know someone who needs community support to live a mobile and independent life after injury? Learn more about fundraising for mobility essentials at helphopelive.org. Mobility matters!

Mobility Matters: “You Are Always Stronger Than You Think You Are”

Just a few days before her final college exams, Morgan Ott fell through scaffolding and became paralyzed from the chest down with limited right hand function. Twenty-two year-old Morgan explains how life has changed since the injury and how mobility impacts her daily life.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan fundraises for mobility essentials


How much did you know about spinal cord injury before you were injured?


Before my injury, I knew little to nothing about spinal cord injury. I have learned a tremendous amount since. When my injury happened, my close friends and family members researched spinal cord injury, the healing process and how my day-to-day life would be affected. I am learning new things every day.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan says she “is learning new things every day”


How did your community respond to your injury?


My family has been by my side from the moment I was in the emergency room. In the beginning, they took me to all of my doctors’ appointments and therapy sessions. Now, they are still always there when I need someone to talk to or if I need any help. Coworkers, friends and the community also reached out to show me their support.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Friends and family have supported Morgan throughout her journey

My friends came to visit me in the hospital often, and one of my sorority sisters set me up with my first fundraising page with a goal of $5,000 on a crowdfunding platform. I switched from a crowdfunding site to HelpHOPELive because I had heard great things about the organization, and how it was easier to continuously raise funds for lifetime expenses with support from HelpHOPELive. Fundraising with HelpHOPELive allows me to request the funds when I need them instead of having to wait until I reach a set goal amount.


Will fundraising influence your mobility options?


Yes! I am currently fundraising for a Galileo tilt table, therapy at Project Walk, a standing frame, an FES system to help my circulation and keep my muscles active, and a Smartdrive power assist device to help me get around more easily by myself.


Have you experienced a range of different emotions since you were injured?


I think I have experienced probably every emotion possible, from extreme happiness to feeling very depressed. I often find that when I am the happiest, I think more about how much better my situation would be if I could just get up and walk again, and then I get very sad. It’s like extreme happiness comes with a price. Most days, though, I am very content and just happy to be where I am.


What do you think is the most common misconception about life in a wheelchair?


A lot of people assume that since I am in a wheelchair I need help with every daily activity or that I can’t live on my own or provide for myself. Most people are also surprised when they find out that I drive (with the use of hand controls).

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

“A lot of people assume…I need help with every daily activity”


What advice would you give to someone else living with a spinal cord injury?


You are always stronger than you think you are. No matter what obstacles life gives you, there are ways to get past them and continue living a healthy life. In terms of working with HelpHOPELive and covering your expenses, it’s never too late to fundraise, but the sooner the better.


Do you still strive to maintain an active lifestyle?


I recently moved down to southern California with my best friend. I am pursuing physical therapy twice a week for two hours per session, and I am finishing school with Arizona State University online. I am planning to get a job within the next couple of weeks to help me keep busy and make money. I also started attending a wheelchair dance class in which there are many other women around my age in chairs learning and performing routines.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

Morgan attends a chair-inclusive dance class


What are your biggest mobility priorities at the moment?


I am focused on staying active with my physical therapies. My goal for physical therapy is to work on core strength and balance and gain back any amount of function, no matter how small.


Where would you like to be in five or 10 years?


In five years, I will have graduated from college and hopefully have a steady job that I enjoy. I can see myself in a steady relationship, establishing a life for myself, having done some traveling in Europe and Asia. In 10 years, I would like to have a successful career and a family.


In your video, you say, “We were going to make it through” after the accident. Do you still feel that way?


More so now than when I was in the hospital, I feel like I’m going to make it through. Keeping a positive attitude definitely helps me carry out day-to-day activities with more confidence and happiness.

Morgan Ott HelpHOPELive

“Keeping a positive attitude definitely helps me,” says Morgan


Unlock new mobility possibilities for yourself or someone you love. Start a fundraising campaign with HelpHOPELive at helphopelive.org. Mobility matters!

HelpHOPELive Clients In The News March 2016

Spring is a season of hope, renewal and rebirth. For these three clients, spring represents a chance to enjoy a healthier, happier future with help from community fundraising.


Scott Truran: Veteran Sets Sights On Treatment For Debilitating MS


Thirty-nine-year-old Scott Truran was diagnosed with a progressive form of multiple sclerosis in 2011. Before the diagnosis, the former Marine was very active and prioritized staying in shape. Today, he has to rely on a cane to walk and his right side feels like it’s been “dipped in concrete,” he explained.

Scott Truran HelpHOPELive veteran MS

Scott will continue to lose mobility as his MS progresses

Scott will continue to lose mobility as his MS progresses. It’s likely he will eventually need a wheelchair to get around. Scott and his family learned about a treatment option for MS that may help to limit Scott’s mobility losses. The treatment involves wiping out his immune system with low-dose chemotherapy, then using stem cells, previously harvested from his blood, to rebuild a new immune system. This treatment option is only available as a clinical trial in the United States. Scott and his family will need to raise $80,000 to receive the treatment in Mexico as well as additional funds to offset the out-of-pocket costs of travel and temporary relocation for Scott and a caregiver.

Scott Truran HelpHOPELive veteran MS

Scott is appealing to his community for support for his treatment goals

“The money is the biggest obstacle,” Scott explained, “but it’s a small price to pay for a chance to slow [the] disease or stop it entirely.” Scott will fundraise with HelpHOPELive to maximize his chances of securing the funds he needs to potentially halt or reverse the progression of his MS. (Veteran’s family asking for help with progressive form of multiple sclerosis)


Theo St. Francis: Young Man With Spinal Cord Injury Plans “His Comeback”


In 2013 while taking part in a pre-orientation at MIT, Theo broke his C6 vertebra in a diving accident. Theo became paralyzed from the chest down with some shoulder and arm movement and limited finger dexterity. Doctors told Theo he would likely never walk again.

Theo St. Francis HelpHOPELive

“I am done managing. I am overcoming.”

As the Sonoma Index-Tribune reported, Theo “set his brilliant mind toward devising a plan for his comeback.” In December 2015, Theo reached a major milestone when he was able to sit on a barstool during a celebration with friends. He tries to spend time away from his manual wheelchair, pursuing activities that “align with what my goals are,” from driving an adaptive car to biking, skiing, surfing, kayaking and traveling.

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Fundraising with HelpHOPELive is allowing Theo to pursue the intensive spinal cord injury therapies he credits with helping him improve his mobility over time. Theo emphasizes the word “recovery” and spends his days looking forward. “I put the impossible in quotes,” he explained. “I am done managing. I am overcoming.” (Theo St. Francis overcoming odds to regain mobility)


Michael Mahan: Community Supports Man Facing Intestine Transplant


In 2012, what Michael Mahan and his family believed to be an upset stomach turned out to be a dangerously twisted small intestine. Since doctors removed the failing organ, every 6-8 weeks, Michael ends up back in the hospital with septic blood. With no small intestine to help his body process food, the husband and father of three relies entirely on intravenous nutrition as he waits for an intestine transplant.

Michael’s priority today is raising funds to cover the out-of-pocket expenses associated with an intestine transplant and follow-up care. He may need to spend up to 10 months in a transplant center after the procedure, and the cost must be paid up front before he can be put on the transplant waiting list.

Michael Mahan HelpHOPELive

Michael is a husband and father of three

Fundraising with HelpHOPELive is helping Michael to secure the funds he needs to get the transplant, but it’s also connecting his family with their supportive community. “We’re just so excited to do everything we can to help him out,” said local resident Jon Rosenlund. “He is a wonderful man and a great father. It’s an honor to help him, but we need a lot of help.” (Fundraiser to benefit man awaiting intestinal transplant)


Get your campaign in the news! If you need help with press releases and media outreach, contact your HelpHOPELive Fundraising Coordinator today.

Between Hope And Acceptance

Abi Dietz was on her way to school in September 2012 when an auto accident left her with a severe traumatic brain injury. After the accident, Abi was unable to move or communicate. After extensive inpatient rehabilitation, in June 2013, Abi was able to move into her mother’s home. Her family began fundraising with HelpHOPELive for uninsured expenses to help improve Abi’s quality of life and maximize her mobility and independence. Abi’s mother, Georgina, gives us an idea of how life changes after a traumatic injury.

Abi Dietz HelpHOPELive

Abi was injured in 2012


Describe a day in Abi’s life.


Abi is 100% dependent on the assistance of others for all activities of daily living. Each morning when Abi wakes up, I or another caregiver do passive range-of-motion exercises with her. We do her personal care and get her into her wheelchair using a hoyer lift. We then read to her, watch YouTube music videos or do other movement exercises, such as throwing a beach ball and asking her to bat or kick it back to us. This responsive movement is actually new, and even though it seems slight, we are glad that she is responding more than she previously had been.

We have Abi stand in the standing frame three times per week. We take her to scheduled doctor’s appointments, the mall, a local art museum and to the park when the weather is nice. We have a music therapist come in weekly and spend an hour working with her. She listens to familiar songs she used to like, and the therapist tries to get her to play a digital guitar on an iPad or move her hand and arm to play a simple instrument.


Have you noticed any improvements since the injury?


Abi is now able to move her left side at times, but her communication is inconsistent. At times, she is more alert and moves more to look around at her environment. She also shows more movement when giving someone a fist bump, trying to hold something and letting it go again, or reacting to someone throwing a ball towards her.

Abi Dietz HelpHOPELive

Abi is currently 100% dependent on the assistance of others


What are some of the biggest challenges of life with a traumatic brain injury?


The accident has changed our family dynamics in many ways and it has been difficult. Finances are a struggle as well as feelings of isolation. The struggle between accepting what is and still having hope is also a challenge.


What are you fundraising with HelpHOPELive for?


We have been able to purchase an accessible van thanks to fundraising and financial help from a family member, but we still have outstanding expenses. Abi was a musician and music therapy has reached her in places that other therapies haven’t. This type of therapy is not covered by insurance and we use the money raised through HelpHOPELive to pay for it. We also fundraise for in-home massage therapy and physical therapy. Abi has painful spasticity issues and these therapies help stretch and relax her so that she is more comfortable.

music therapy

Music therapy is not covered by insurance


What does hope mean to you?


Hope means believing that things can change. It takes a lot of patience to wait for change to happen and as I said before, it is hard to find the balance between hope and acceptance.


What can the average person do to recognize Brain Injury Awareness Month in Abi’s honor?


You can donate to HelpHOPELive in honor of Abi to help her secure life-enhancing therapeutic treatment that could help her regain mobility and communication skills. You can also send a card to her or to anyone who has a traumatic brain injury. We receive beautiful cards with nature photography from one couple at least once per month. It is so nice to know we are not forgotten.

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

March is Brain Injury Awareness Month


Follow Abi’s story at helphopelive.org. If you know a family that needs help covering the uninsured expenses related to a traumatic injury, start a fundraising campaign with our nonprofit today.

Overcoming Barriers With Cerebral Palsy

Hi! I’m Chris Klein and this is my story.

My life didn’t start out like my family expected. My umbilical cord was coming out before me, so the doctors had to perform an emergency C-section in order to save my life. I was without oxygen for 45 minutes and was given CPR for another 40 minutes. I should have been dead, but I survived. However, the lack of oxygen caused an injury on the motor portion of my brain. I have a disability called cerebral palsy.

Chris Klein HelpHOPELive

My disability affects my communication, so for the first six years of my life it was a guessing game for everybody. Do you know how frustrating it is not to be able to express yourself? Do you know how frustrating it is when your parents or siblings can’t understand you? This was what the first six years of my life was like. Every time I wanted or needed something the guessing games would begin. At times, I became so frustrated that I would curl up on the floor and just cry.

At age 6, Judy, my speech language pathologist, wondered if I could use an augmentative alternative communication (AAC) device. She sent us home with one, and by that night, I was already talking in complete sentences. I could finally tell my four older siblings to leave me alone.

I can truly say augmentative alternative communication changed the course of my life. I was put in the regular classroom after receiving the AAC device because I was able to communicate. I was able to show teachers my language was intact and I needed to be challenged more and more. My AAC device also gave me the opportunity to interact with my peers, just like everybody else. The relationships I built were a big part of my growth as a child. I can honestly say without an AAC device I wouldn’t be where I am today.

The AAC device paved the way for me to go to college. I was able to get a degree in kinesiology and a master’s in theology, because I had a way to communicate. The relationships I built in college and seminary grew into a community of personal care assistants. Again, I wouldn’t have been able to develop these relationships without AAC. You need communication to develop any type of relationship, so without my AAC device, I couldn’t have done it.

Chris Klein HelpHOPELive

“You need communication to develop any type of relationship”

Eight years ago, my friends kept bugging me to go on one of the Internet dating sites. You have to understand, I was very happy single, but I decided to agree to it so they would leave me alone afterwards! I didn’t expect to meet anybody I would connect with, but I did. Dawn and I talked for a month before we met. This was her first time experiencing a person using AAC, so talking on the phone and emailing each other helped her get to know the person I am. She had been around disabilities all of her life, but communicating with somebody with an AAC device was different. But she was willing to learn, and as we dated she began to realize how much I could do.

Three years after we met, we were married. It has been a real blessing to have a partner to share life together. Communication is a key aspect to any relationship, so we know if I didn’t have an AAC device, we wouldn’t be married. We have to continue working on our communication, but that’s just normal for any couple in a relationship.

After being unsuccessful finding a job after seminary, I decided to start public speaking. I figured I was given the gift to speak, so I put myself out there. Who would have thought a person who is unable to talk would become a motivational speaker? I have traveled all over the country and even the world speaking to a variety of groups. This is why I came to HelpHOPELive: we are in need of a new accessible vehicle. I have limited my speaking engagements because right now we don’t have a reliable vehicle.

Chris Klein cerebral palsy HelpHOPELive

Chris is fundraising for an accessible van

Everybody deserves a chance to live life to the fullest and dream big. This is why I started an organization called BeCOME: AAC. It stands for Building Connections with Others through Mentoring and Educating about AAC. We want to help beginning users become proficient communicators. We believe having expert AAC users, like myself, coming along side beginning users will help them reach their potential sooner. We know there are some people who are reluctant to try AAC and believe a mentoring relationship with an experienced user will help convince them an AAC device would improve their life. They would also have a chance to impact other people’s lives with an AAC device.

I want to convey through my outreach and writings that life doesn’t have to stop when you have a barrier of any kind in front of you. I want people to overcome the barrier or barriers they have in their lives. I believe too many people quit. We need more people to persevere, so that they can make an impact on other people’s lives. I have to believe my story shows people what you can become if you persevere. I want people to say, Chris Klein ran the race to the best of his abilities.

We all will face some type of barrier, and it is up to us to decide whether or not we can overcome it. I believe the easy way out is to give up. The hardest thing to do is to accept the challenge and live life to the fullest.


We are proud to support community-based fundraising for people like Chris who live with catastrophic injuries, including cerebral palsy, ALS and multiple sclerosis. Know someone who needs help? Visit our website to start a campaign for yourself or a loved one in need.

Voices Of Hope: We Stayed Together After A Catastrophic Injury

Katie started dating Richard Travia when they were freshmen at Villanova University. Two years after graduation, Richard became paralyzed from the chest down after a diving accident at the beach. Katie and Richard stayed together after the injury and, today, they are happily married with two young children.

Richard and Katie Travia HelpHOPELive

Katie and Richard with their two youngsters in 2014


Did the injury impact your relationship?


Katie: The early stages were challenging, scary and overwhelming. Richard’s injury was a big obstacle on our path together, but we didn’t let it stop us from continuing with our goals and future. Today, there are still limitations to what we can do as a couple. For instance, we haven’t traveled to Europe together since his injury because we are fearful of the accessibility challenges; we can’t do some outdoor activities together that we used to enjoy; but we find enjoyment and travel opportunities elsewhere. The injury has brought us challenges, but our relationship is stronger than ever.


Today, how does love play a role in your daily life?


Richard is my best friend and soulmate. We met and started dating when we were young, but we have grown and gone through so much together. I can’t imagine going through a day without talking to him 10 times. We are always eager to see each other every evening after work. Aside from the fact that he can’t stand on his own anymore, you would barely know that the injury had occurred. He is always positive, patient and logical. He keeps me in check.

Katie Richard Travia HelpHOPELive engagement

Katie calls Richard her “best friend and soulmate”

Each day has its own challenges, but we have built an amazing family together with two beautiful children and an awesome dog. Our love for each other and our love for our family is overwhelming to us. Sometimes, amidst the craziness at home, we will both look at each other and smile and say, “Look how lucky we are.”


How did Richard propose to you?


He was amazingly determined to keep with tradition: for months he practiced getting down on one knee during physical therapy. We got engaged on Christmas in 2007 and got married in October of 2008 at my church in New Jersey. Richard practiced standing in physical therapy, and with the help of two friends and a walker, he stood when I walked down the aisle and when we said our vows.

Richard and Katie Travia wedding

Richard pursed physical therapy to be able to stand for his wedding vows


What advice would you give to someone else trying to hold onto their relationship after injury?


Keeping a positive mindset and remembering that things won’t always go as planned is the best way to remain sane. Surround yourself with positive people and things that make you happy. Find great support groups online or in your community and talk to people going through a similar situation.


How does your family and community provide support?


Being in a wheelchair for 10 years has its challenges, both physical and psychological. Richard has been lucky, because everyone surrounded him when he was injured and they stuck with him. He was able to move on with the life that he wanted to have because of that support. Our immediate family and friends have been amazing to us over the years, whether by modifying their homes to accommodate Richard’s needs or helping to lift Richard into a restaurant, home or location for a social outing.

HelpHOPELive friends fundraising

Friends and family “stuck with him” when Richard was injured

Another major source of support was the Villanova community. We graduated from Villanova together but we have received support from people we didn’t even graduate with. From getting people together to watch the game at home with Richard to VIP tickets to basketball games, our Villanova family has been so amazingly supportive. Now, Richard gives back to that community through his involvement with the Villanova Alumni Senate and other activities on campus.


Did that support translate into fundraising success?


Within the first two years after Richard’s injury, we did a great deal of fundraising with HelpHOPELive [pictured below], including a 5K Walk/Run, open bar nights and small events at schools in our area. The support was overwhelming. We were able to raise over $200,000, which has helped us tremendously. We are still relying on those funds now a decade later to cover medical expenses.

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One of our largest purchases was an accessible van for Richard. We were also able to cover the cost of home exercise equipment, prescriptions, ramps and other purchases that helped to make our living situation more accessible for him. The expenses associated with paralysis never go away and insurance covers very little, so the fundraising we did early on has provided some comfort for us over the years.


What is the thing you love most about your relationship?


Richard and I don’t have the best luck, but through all the obstacles over the years, we have still accomplished all that we wanted to accomplish, and we have done it together, as a team.


Did you find love before or after a life-changing injury or illness? Share your story with us in the comments section below and you could be selected to participate in an interview!

How Your Donation Will Support Our Nonprofit Mission

In addition to helping us to provide emergency assistance grants, your contribution will help fuel our mission to support community-based fundraising for people with unmet medical and related expenses due to cell and organ transplants or catastrophic injuries and illnesses. Learn why that matters so much to families across the country.

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How HelpHOPELive Serves Families


Roughly 20% of families who have health insurance still struggle to cover their medical expenses. We understand that a medical crisis can create a severe emotional, physical and financial burden for any family. Community support, where relatives, friends, neighbors and co-workers get involved in fundraising efforts, is often a vital untapped resource that can help people pay for uncovered medical expenses.

When a family chooses to fundraise with HelpHOPELive, they benefit from:

  • An online Campaign Page where they can ask friends and family for life-changing donations and receive messages of support
  • One-on-one consultation from one of our expert Fundraising Coordinators to help them develop a personalized campaign that is tailored to the needs and interests of the patient and their support network.
  • Custom fundraising materials like event flyers, awareness materials and press releases
  • The opportunity to earn Challenge Grants by reaching fundraising milestones
  • Our nonprofit status: fundraising support that does not jeopardize their medical coverage status (Medicaid, SSI)and the opportunity for their community members to make tax deductible contributions
  • Expert fundraising advice backed by more than 30 years of experience building successful campaigns

For many clients struggling with life-changing conditions, we are more than just a fundraising resource: we are a lifeline set apart by our compassion and expertise. In fact, in a 2014 survey, 92% of respondents rated our customer service as Excellent, Very Good or Good and 91% said they would recommend HelpHOPELive to another family or had already done so.


What Clients Say About Us


“We have had numerous experiences with nonprofit organizations and HelpHOPELive has been the best we have ever worked with. Compassionate, always ready to support and help, they have been rock steady in their devotion to those in need.”

The name HelpHOPELive says it all.”

“HelpHOPELive is a huge relief to me during a very stressful time.”

If it were not for HelpHOPELive, my son would never have received his transplant.

“Tangible financial support has helped immensely, by lifting a burden that would otherwise be hovering and weighing over us”

Many families would not be able to cover their vital medical expenses without fundraising. Your donations will help us to continue providing key fundraising support to families that depend on it.


We Still Need Your Help To Spread Hope!


We rely on contributors like you to help us continue serving families coping with the financial burden of uncovered medical expenses. Find out how you can keep hope alive for these families with your donation and support.